Engaging culture session04
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Engaging culture session04

on

  • 252 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
252
Views on SlideShare
252
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as OpenOffice

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Could be a bit 'bitty': various things to get you started but not necessarily all joined up at this point.
  • Link to assessment; the tools are the kind of things that students may want to use for their assessment.
  • Motivated signs eg smoke -a signifier of fire, putting my coat on -a signifier of my intention to go out, a footprint -a signifier of there having been a footprinter, etc (name a few more ....?) Aribtrary signs eg most language is arbitrary (exceptions ?onomatopoeia, BSL etc), the cenventions for road signs (blue disks, red triangles etc), Of course the interesting thing is how these interact in our 'decoding' of signs in culture. Eg a big house: motivated sign of wealth, arbitrary sign of goodness or 'worthiness' ....
  • Motivated signs eg smoke -a signifier of fire, putting my coat on -a signifier of my intention to go out, a footprint -a signifier of there having been a footprinter, etc (name a few more ....?) Aribtrary signs eg most language is arbitrary (exceptions ?onomatopoeia, BSL etc), the cenventions for road signs (blue disks, red triangles etc), Of course the interesting thing is how these interact in our 'decoding' of signs in culture. Eg a big house: motivated sign of wealth, arbitrary sign of goodness or 'worthiness' ....
  • Connotative meaning is quite important. Think about it in language: ... next slide eg
  • Connotative meaning is quite important. Think about it in language: ... next slide eg
  • “ lady” &/vs “woman” etc. Most of these could be used to refer to the same person. Buzz-pairs > whole group discussion.... Why would the different words be chosen? What might they imply or what might be the connotations ?
  • Note the recursion of the tripartite pattern: the sign can itself become a signifier in a 'meta sign' that is, here, a myth. Pattern of recursion works on lots of levels: a book comes to 'stand for' a status or a statement on your shelves derived from but more than the words and arguments or stories within it .... (discuss?)
  • Find bit in the handout to look over. What analysis does Barthes give of this imge? What forces does he identify at work and how? Do we agree or disagree, a bit of both? How do we respond as Christians?
  • This leads into definition of myth: handout. Later looking at hegemony and ideology. But first ....
  • Note the recursion of the tripartite pattern: the sign can itself become a signifier in a 'meta sign' that is, here, a myth. Pattern of recursion works on lots of levels: a book comes to 'stand for' a status or a statement on your shelves derived from but more than the words and arguments or stories within it .... (discuss?)
  • In this case, we need to extend things with further examples. If time in buzz groups and plenarise. What myths can we identify 'embodide' in artefacts or texts in our culture? (Potentially, try some out). 'My' possibles: ... cars and the myth of individual freedom (cf Top Gear). Jeans (cf the Jeaning of America) relating to the Am West, freedom, individualism, Remembrance Sunday ... military and national self justification etc? (cf Runcie and Falklands remembrance). (cf ANZAC day - April)
  • Could refer back to Gavagai and Blick. Actually nearly all meaning is socially constructed if to be shared (vs Humpty Dumpty in Alice) and therefore negotiated. The diagram shows overlap and we are constantly calibrating our usage and understanding against the implications of other people's usage. ...
  • Therefore issues of power, influence, resistance etc come into negotiations (fashion's 20% of trend leaders ..., ) Eg's of this in sociolinguistics ... pronouns of solidarity and power .. Tu / Vous tu/vosotros/usted(es) du /ihr /Sie historically – Thou in English. (Quakers, also 'would his majesty core to ..r' etc)
  • May be a new term to some (?) Ask for any comments or questions. Note Marxist origins esp Gramsci. Note the importance of the 'velvet glove' version of exercise of power. Cf pronouns of solidarity etc; some cultural analysis is attempting to trace the contours of power relations in the use and meanings of cultural texts and artefacts.
  • I think that this definition shows its origins in Marxist discourse. I think that ideologies can operate among the marginalisde and dispossessed in countering that of a dominant group.... It could be seen in relation to justifications for states of affairs. Relates to Marxist ideas of 'false consciousness'
  • Find bit in the handout to look over. What analysis does Barthes give of this imge? What forces does he identify at work and how? Do we agree or disagree, a bit of both? How do we respond as Christians?
  • What are the main observations? What kind of analytical tools does Fiske use? What do we find helpful? Is there anything we struggle with? Is there anything we find particularly persuasive or unpersuasive.
  • Connect with Marxian analysis. Economic determinism and a prediliction for the social tended to give analysis of mass media and culture in 'top-down' terms. (Adorno etc). What people like Fiske, Bourdieu, Hebdige etc start to do is to show that there is also a bottom-up resistance or subverting for own ends: asserting own meanings for own purposes. But this is dialogical with the 'inherited' meanings that are more widely used and may have hegemonic dimensions. The evasion of hegmonic meanings is pleasurable (gives a frisson, often).
  • Connect with Marxian analysis. Economic determinism and a prediliction for the social tended to give analysis of mass media and culture in 'top-down' terms. (Adorno etc). What people like Fiske, Bourdieu, Hebdige etc start to do is to show that there is also a bottom-up resistance or subverting for own ends: asserting own meanings for own purposes. But this is dialogical with the 'inherited' meanings that are more widely used and may have hegemonic dimensions. The evasion of hegmonic meanings is pleasurable (gives a frisson, often).
  • Handout for intersessional reading: should be Fiske and/or Hebdige on seiotic guerilla warfare.

Engaging culture session04 Engaging culture session04 Presentation Transcript

  • Module number: 6741 & 7741title: Engaging Culturesession: 4 “Agur!” Thats a greeting. Or is it? How would you know?
  • Opening prayerThe grace of our Lord JesusChrist, the love of God and thefellowship of the Holy Spirit bewith youAnd also with you.God, help us to listen;and in our listening to hearYou.God, be in our thinking:and renew our minds.God, we will speak together:let our conversations be 2words in the Word.
  • Opening prayerThe grace of our Lord JesusChrist, the love of God and thefellowship of the Holy Spirit bewith youAnd also with you.God, help us to listen;and in our listening to hearYou.God, be in our thinking:and renew our minds.God, we will speak together:let our conversations be 3words in the Word.
  • What were looking attoday ...The questions of culturesand meaning:semiotics and the socialdimensions of meaning 4
  • How were learning ... Discussion Some exercisesintrospection,reflection on experience, Listening Reading ... 5
  • Why were learningthis ...Continuing to engage withsome of the basics of thedebates that could help toresource our ownexploration and analysis oftexts and artefacts.We also need to begin tothink about the biggerissues surrounding 6artefacts...
  • I.e. the meaning is intrinsic to Signs can beignified is extrinsic to the signifier motivated or arbitrary 7
  • Lets see if weve got that ...… choose a something,Then tell your neighbour;Whats the signified, thesignifer and the sign .. 8
  • Signifier may be used habitually in c signifiedAnd so pick up connotations from that syntacticd the edges or in the background; emotional col 9
  • Some examples …? 10
  • Connotative meaning - Compare / contrast:“lady” “woman” “girl” “wench” “lass” “ Buzz and plenarise .... 11
  • 12
  • What was Barthes saying about this image? What was he getting at?Photocopy at:http://www.scribd.com/doc/4477636/Mythology-eBook-En-PDF-Barthes-Roland-Mythologies-Myth- 13Today
  • A lot of writing onsigns /semiotics tendsto focus on anindividual interpreter.Barthes draws ourattention to social(and thereforepolitical) dimensionsof meaning; notably“mythologies”. 14
  • And he does it by a recursion of the sign... for m Significatian conceptOften using connotative meanings. 15
  • Myth. /mɪθ / n.... Myths can be seen as extended metaphors.Like metaphors, myths help us to make sense ofour experiences within a culture. They expressand serve to organize shared ways ofconceptualizing something within a culture. ... tomake dominant cultural and historical values,attitudes and beliefs seem entirely natural,normal, self-evident, timeless, obvious common-sense - and thus objective and true reflectionsof the way things are. 16
  • Pick up from the definition of myth;“... shared ways of conceptualizing somethingwithin a culture” Ds concept Our concept Bs concept Cs concept 17
  • “... shared ways of conceptualizing somethingwithin a culture” therefore involves (usuallyby connotative meaning) .... Power and resistance Our concept: negotiated Solidarity and (better: group identity negotiating) between sign users Play, pleasure, entertainment Look (again) at Vanhoozers 10 principles ... 18
  • Hegemony. /hɛˈɡɛməni/ or /hɛˈdʒɛməni/   n .......the predominance of one social class overothers ... political and economic control,... theability of the dominant class to project its ownway of seeing the world so that those who aresubordinated by it accept it as common senseand natural. 19
  • ideology.  /aɪdiːˈɔlədʒi/ n ....... a system of ideas and beliefs. ... closely tiedto the concept of power ... "shared ideas orbeliefs which serve to justify the interests ofdominant groups" ... it legitimises thedifferential power that groups hold and as suchit distorts the real situation that people findthemselves in. 20
  • ideologymythhegemonyHow do yousee thesethings playingout in thisimage?Buzz > 21plenary
  • Fiske and theshoppingmall ...(Reading thePopular) etcWhat do wemake ofshoppingmalls? 22
  • Not just seeing ordinarypeople as victims anddupes of mass media etc.“Semiotic guerilla warfare”“bricolage” (making do)significance of the idea... 23
  • Can we come up with examples of…“Semiotic guerilla warfare”“bricolage” (making do)significance of the idea...From our own lives, communities,experiences, observations orreading? 24
  • Another tool-of culturalanalysis ... 25
  • place in Sign systemAttemp s ts To Identificontrol. cation .. What is Received produce & d re-used And how? 26
  • And ....For tomorrow ...Revisit and add to or rework your culturalartefact (or choose another, if you wish) totalk about it in the light of the things wehave looked at today. 27
  • 28