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Intro - digitalcitizens

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Shortened version of digital citizen

Shortened version of digital citizen

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Intro - digitalcitizens Intro - digitalcitizens Presentation Transcript

  • Integrating Digital Citizenship into the Classroomwith MyBigCampusAnastasia TreklesClinical Associate Professor, Purdue University CalumetBoard Member, Indiana Computer Educators (ISTE Affiliate)atrekles@purdue.edu
  • Outline Introductions and goals Digital citizenship in your school and classroom MyBigCampus (MBC) for digital citizenship best practices support More information
  • ObjectivesBy the end of the session you will be able to: Discuss the issues between school network filtering and 21st century education Identify the nine elements of Digital Citizenship Describe why MyBigCampus is a useful tool for teachers, schools, students, and parents with regard to Internet safety and digital learning Use MyBigCampus to collaborate with students and other teachers Create assignments, quizzes, and lesson bundles with MyBigCampus Manage cloud-based documents, profiles, and interactions within MyBigCampus
  • When we limit kids’ access and ignore the problem,they look at school “computing” like this...
  • Or worse...
  • Learning doesn’t happen when students are bored - we knowthis already!So we do what we can to engage them, but are school policiesholding us back?
  • Students generally will use the Internet the way they want to,and access the sites they want to, while away from home (seeYan, 2009).They also spend a lot of time trying to circumvent our bestefforts to “protect” them online at school.WHY?
  • Don’t we want this instead?
  • What does it mean to be a “Digital Citizen” anyhow? Nine themes of Digital Citizenship (http://www.digitalcitizenship.net/ Nine_Elements.html) Access: Full participation in society Commerce: Buying and selling of goods Communication: Exchange of information Literacy: Understanding appropriate uses of technology Etiquette: Standards of conduct and procedure Law: Responsibility for actions and deeds Rights and Responsibilities: Understanding our digital freedoms Wellness: Physical and psychological well-being in the online world Security and Self-Protection: Precautions to guarantee safety
  • Why Schools Find it Difficult to TeachDigital Citizenship The Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA) is the primary law enforcing filtering on school networks Public schools and libraries must be CIPA-compliant in order to receive Federal E-Rate funds 40% of libraries employ CIPA- required filtering on their networks 100% of schools employ those (See Jaeger & Yan, 2009) same filters
  • (Mis)Understanding CIPACIPA dictates that filters block visual imagery on the Internet that is: Obscene Contains child pornography Is “harmful to minors”CIPA compliance (and compliance with the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act[COPPA]) requires an Internet safety policy that addresses: Limitations on access to inappropriate materials online Safety and security when using electronic mail, chat rooms, and other communication forums Unauthorized access and circumventing of filters through hacking Dissemination of personal information of minors
  • (Mis)Understanding CIPACIPA does NOT: Have any impact on teachers or other adults at the school (or library) Prohibit teachers from overriding filtering of sites when needed for educational purposes Require the blocking of social media sites like YouTube, Wikipedia, or Facebook Refer to “inappropriate” text, only imagery Address intellectual property, cyberbullying, plagiarism, or any other ethical issues related to Internet use
  • Digital CitizenshipHollandsworth, Dowdy,and Donovan (2011)provide an interestingstudy of what is actuallytaught at many schoolsMany are not followingstate standards, and/orconcentrate only oncertain things
  • Online is Different Can we really control everything kids see online? Many schools realize that they can’t Some are implementing digital safety and citizenship curriculum due to state standards and new E- Rate regulations But what does this curriculum look like?
  • Elements of Complete DCIn order to incorporate digital citizenship themes (http://www.digitalcitizenship.net/Nine_Elements.html) more fully, it is necessary to: Allow full participation and access to communication and sharing to happen online Help students understand context and what is and is not appropriate to share, use, and remix Ensure that students understand issues of public versus private information Ensure that students understand the difference between advertisements and real content Allow students to come to their own conclusions, and help them reflect on why they made those choices Enforce reasonable consequences of inappropriate actions
  • State Core StandardsThe Common Core Standards adopted by many states stress digitalliteracy and the ability to comprehend and apply information in avariety of ways from grade 2 on up (http://www.corestandards.org/about-the-standards/key-points-in-english-language-arts)So, if we are not exposing students to opportunities to makeimportant discriminations and decisions in the real online space thatthey occupy beyond school, then we are doing them a disservice
  • Suggested ReadingChildren’s Online Privacy Protection Act, 91 U.S.C. §§ 6501-6506 (2010).Children’s Internet Protection Act of 2000, Pub. L. No. 106–554, 20 U.S.C. §§ 6801, 6777, 9134 and 47 U.S.C. § 254.Cooke, L. (2007). Controlling the net: European approaches to content and access regulation. Journal of InformationScience, 33(3), 360-376. doi: 10.1177/0165551506072163Frechette, J. (2005). Cyber-democracy or cyber-hegemony? exploring the political and economic structures of theinternet as an alternative source of information. Library Trends, 53(4), 555-575, 664.Hollandsworth, R., Dowdy, L., & Donovan, J. (2011). Digital citizenship in K-12: It takes a village. TechTrends, 55(4),37-47. doi: 10.1007/s11528-011-0510-zHoughton-Jan, S. (2010). Internet filtering. Library Technology Reports, 46(8), 25-33, 45.Hunter, C.D. (2000). Internet filter effectiveness – Testing over- and underinclusive blocking decisions of four popularweb filters. Social Science Computer Review, 18(2), 214-222. doi: 10.1177/089443930001800209Jaeger, P. T., & Yan, Z. (2009). One law with two outcomes: Comparing the implementation of CIPA in public librariesand schools. Information Technology and Libraries, 28(1), 6-14.
  • Suggested ReadingLessig, L. (1999). The law of the horse: What cyberlaw might teach. Harvard Law Review, 1999(113), 501-549.Lazarinis, F. (2010). Online risks obstructing safe internet access for students. The Electronic Library, 28(1),157-170. doi: 10.1108/0246047011023441Jukes, I., McCain, T., & Crockett, L. (2011). Education and the role of the educator in the future. Phi DeltaKappan, 92(4), 15-21.Jansen, B. A. (2010). Internet filtering 2.0: Checking intellectual freedom and participative practices at theschoolhouse door. Knowledge Quest, 39(1), 46-53.Oxley, C. (2010). Digital citizenship: Developing an ethical and responsible online culture. International SchoolLibrarianship: Selected Papers from the IASL Annual Conference, 1-11.Prensky, M. (2001). Digital natives, digital immigrants. On the Horizon 9(5), 1–5. Retrieved from http://www.marcprensky.com/writing/Prensky%20-%20Digital%20Natives,%20Digital%20Immigrants%20-%20Part1.pdf.
  • Suggested ReadingPreston, C.B. (2007). Zoning the internet: A new approach to protecting children online. Brigham YoungUniversity Law Review, 2007(6), 1417-1469.Ramaswami, R. (2010). Nothing to LOL about. THE Journal, 37(6), 24-30.Rodden, K. (2003). The Children’s Internet Protection Act in public schools: The government stepping onparents’ toes? Fordham Law Review, 71(5), 2141-2175.Weigel, C., James, C., & Gardner, H. (2009). Learning: Peering backward and looking forward in thedigital era. International Journal of Learning and Media, 1(1), 1-18. doi: 10.1162/ijlm.2009.0005Willard, N. (2010). Teach them to swim. Knowledge Quest: Journal of the American Association of SchoolLibrarians, 39(1), 54-61.Yan, Z. (2009). Differences in high school and college students’ basic knowledge and perceived educationof Internet safety: Do high school students really benefit from the Children’s Internet Protection Act?Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 30(3), 209-217. doi: 10.1016/j.appdev.2008.10.007
  • Web ResourcesBalanced Filtering: http://balancedfiltering.org/Speed of Creativity: http://www.speedofcreativity.orgMarc Prensky’s writings: http://www.marcprensky.com/writingCamille Maydonik’s portfolio: http://eportfolio.camilleteaches.com/artifacts/researchpapers/the-importance-of-digital-citizenship/CIPA Overview: http://www.fcc.gov/guides/childrens-internet-protection-actSocial Media tips from the Federal Trade Commission: http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/pubs/consumer/tech/tec14.shtmiSafe: http://isafe.org