The social aspect of
Smart Wearable
Systems in the era of
Internet-of-Things
C. PETROPOULOS1, A. TALAVARI1, A. FOTOPOULOS2...
Introduction
Efforts to research and develop smart wearable systems (SWS) have
been increasing in both academia and indust...
The story so far..
Web 1.0
• One way
communication
• Mostly static
html pages
Web 2.0
• Two way
communication
• Data flow
...
New possibilities lead to new
products
 Cloud Computing
 Miniaturization of sensors
 Low energy wireless
technologies
a...
“The network formed by things/objects having identities, virtual
personalities operating in smart spaces using intelligent...
The elation of cloud computing
 The worldwide cloud computing market will grow at a
36% compound annual growth rate (CAGR...
Low EnergyWireless
Technologies
 Bluetooth Smart,
 ANT
 ANT+
 RF4CE
 ZigBee
 Wi-Fi
 Nike+
 IrDA
 NFC
 Z-wave
The Miniaturization of Sensors
Recent technological advances in integration and miniaturization
of sensors, embedded micro...
Ubiquitous computing
The ubiquitous computing (presumed as Web 3.0) states that
computing will appear in any device and in...
Smart devices and sensors communicate
Sensors and smart devices are now one.
Smart Wearable Devices
Smart Wearable Devices
Fin Ring
Fin Ring
Smart Glasses
Smart Wearable Devices
Wearable devices, social aspects
and relations
 Wireless wearable devices that connect an elderly person to formal
or inf...
Wearable devices, social aspects
and relations
 User needs and privacy: At times, there is tension between
assistance and...
Risks
 As more devices enter the realm of the IoT,
data attacks aimed at the diversity of new
Internet-connected endpoint...
Predictions
In 2018:
• 18 million wearable
devices
• 16 million IoT devices
• Exceeding tablets
and smartphones
THANK YOU
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The social aspect of Smart Wearable Systems in the era of Internet-of-Things

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Social networking (Web 2.0) changed the way of interaction and communication of humans-to-humans, companies-to-customers, universities-to-students and state-to-citizens. The movement from static web pages (Web 1.0) to social networking and the rapid growth of smart devices created a new need for more complex data-on-demand across multiple platforms and devices. Cloud computing, miniaturization of sensors and low energy wireless technologies offered adequate possibilities to measure and understand environmental, health, industrial and other indicators, delivered in smart devices or in the web. The skyrocketing proliferation of the bidirectional communication between sensors and smart devices created a new series of products bringing us to the era of Internet-of-Things (IoT). The ubiquitous computing (presumed as Web 3.0) states that computing will appear in any device and in any location. Smart Wearable Systems (SWS) constitute the latest effort of academia and industry to toward this direction, aiming to enhance the communication and the velocity between IoT applications, smart devices (smartphones, tablets & smart TVs) and social networks. In this paper an analysis over social aspects of SWS is performed. Recent reports show that IoT market will be bigger than the total market of smart devices and PCs combined, enlarging the overall interest.

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The social aspect of Smart Wearable Systems in the era of Internet-of-Things

  1. 1. The social aspect of Smart Wearable Systems in the era of Internet-of-Things C. PETROPOULOS1, A. TALAVARI1, A. FOTOPOULOS2 1. B.SC., COMPUTER SYSTEMS ENGINEERING, TECHNOLOGICAL EDUCATION INSTITUTE OF PIRAEUS 2. M.SC., INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY, NATIONAL AND KAPODISTRIAN UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS
  2. 2. Introduction Efforts to research and develop smart wearable systems (SWS) have been increasing in both academia and industry .  Elderly people have a greater level of disability due to age-related diseases, a greater need for care and assistance, and are more likely to be admitted to a hospital or nursing home.  Consumer wearables;smart glasses,smart watches, generally smart devices that make people lives easier and use smartphones as a mean to communicate.
  3. 3. The story so far.. Web 1.0 • One way communication • Mostly static html pages Web 2.0 • Two way communication • Data flow between users and website • Example:Facebo ok,Google+ Web 3.0 • Not only humans but also machines will interact with each other. • Internet of Things and machine to machine communications
  4. 4. New possibilities lead to new products  Cloud Computing  Miniaturization of sensors  Low energy wireless technologies adequate possibilities to measure and understand environmental, health, industrial and other indicators, delivered in smart devices or in the web.
  5. 5. “The network formed by things/objects having identities, virtual personalities operating in smart spaces using intelligent interfaces to connect and communicate with the users, social and environmental contexts.”
  6. 6. The elation of cloud computing  The worldwide cloud computing market will grow at a 36% compound annual growth rate (CAGR) through 2016, reaching a market size of $19.5B by 2016.  38% of enterprises surveyed break out cloud computing budgets, while 60% include cloud-related spending as part of their enterprise-wide IT budgets.  The median enterprise cloud computing budget is $675,000 and the mean enterprise cloud computing budget is $8,234,438. The study found the largest enterprise cloud computing budget at $125M. Enterprise Cloud Computing Poised for Explosive Growth During Next Two Years, TheInfoPro,2013
  7. 7. Low EnergyWireless Technologies  Bluetooth Smart,  ANT  ANT+  RF4CE  ZigBee  Wi-Fi  Nike+  IrDA  NFC  Z-wave
  8. 8. The Miniaturization of Sensors Recent technological advances in integration and miniaturization of sensors, embedded microcontrollers, and radio interfaces on a single chip and in wireless networks have led to a new generation for Internet of Things combined with Healthcare. Smart wearable systems: Current status and future challenges, Marie Chan,2012
  9. 9. Ubiquitous computing The ubiquitous computing (presumed as Web 3.0) states that computing will appear in any device and in any location.
  10. 10. Smart devices and sensors communicate Sensors and smart devices are now one.
  11. 11. Smart Wearable Devices
  12. 12. Smart Wearable Devices Fin Ring
  13. 13. Fin Ring Smart Glasses Smart Wearable Devices
  14. 14. Wearable devices, social aspects and relations  Wireless wearable devices that connect an elderly person to formal or informal caregivers or a call centre, have psychological effects on patients.  Informational privacy is connected with the confidentiality of patient data, which means that this aspect is going to take on increasing importance in the future with the on-going growth of data processing.  System efficiency, reliability, and unobtrusiveness: These are essential for the widespread use of devices and technologies. Wearable systems and devices must have efficient software and hardware and be unobtrusive [Research on social relations cognitive model of mobile nodes in Internet of Things Jian An ,2013]
  15. 15. Wearable devices, social aspects and relations  User needs and privacy: At times, there is tension between assistance and autonomy, or privacy and independence that characterizes the individual’s judgment in using telehealth technology  Interoperability: As health care develops from an organization centred via service-centred towards an individual-centred system, information systems involved must be semantically interoperable, process-related, decision-supportive, contextsensitive, user-oriented, and trustworthy  Technological capabilities of wearable systems: They must meet healthcare professionals and end-users requirements in disease management and general remote Health Management. [Research on social relations cognitive model of mobile nodes in Internet of Things Jian An ,2013]
  16. 16. Risks  As more devices enter the realm of the IoT, data attacks aimed at the diversity of new Internet-connected endpoints will inevitably become more common.  The Internet-connected devices installed on various objects, such as cars and home appliances,can be used for unlawful surveillance or intrusion into private life  Another threat that must be taken into consideration is the data privacy risks posed by those devices. [The Internet of Things:do more devices mean more risks?, Mark O’Neill,,2014]
  17. 17. Predictions In 2018: • 18 million wearable devices • 16 million IoT devices • Exceeding tablets and smartphones
  18. 18. THANK YOU
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