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Review on the effective use of augmented reality last

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  • 1. P. H. Yannakopoulos, A.A. Fotopoulos, I.A. Konidas, A. I. Smyrnakis, A. H. Talavari, Ch. N. Tasiopoulos REVIEW ON THE EFFECTIVE USE OF AUGMENTED REALITY TO PEOPLE WITH SPECIAL SKILLS International Scientific Conference eRA-6 2011
  • 2.
    • We have live view of real world environment, in which details are augmented by a PC using sensor inputs. Not visual recreation of an environment that is not real, as Virtual Reality does.
    • Augmented Reality supplements real world in stead of completely re-creating it like Virtual Reality does.
    [A Survey of Augmented Reality, Ronald T. Azuma, 1997]
  • 3.
    • Augmented Reality is when a PC is used as tool to make a task easier for a human to perform. Visual objects include more information than a human can detect with his senses.
    • Physiotherapists and doctors agree that Augmented Reality helps patients’ rehabilitation.
    Fig.: http://www.extratech.gr [A Survey of Augmented Reality, Ronald T. Azuma, 1997]
  • 4. [Fig. 1, Augmented Reality for Rehabilitation of Cognitive Disabled Children: A Preliminary Study, Richard et. al., 2007]
  • 5.
    • A non-immersive recreational and educational augmented reality application, dedicated in aiding disabled pupils by allowing them to handle virtual objects in a simple and intuitive way.
    • Four virtual fruits are placed randomly on the left page of the book. Pupils are asked to place the identical virtual fruits into the same position on the right page.
    [Augmented Reality for Rehabilitation of Cognitive Disabled Children: A Preliminary Study, Richard et. al., 2007]
  • 6.
    • After finishing pairing, the program uses virtual cues ( blue and red circles) to help the kid recognise any mistakes that might have done.
    • There are also auditory cues in order to give more help to the kids.
    [Augmented Reality for Rehabilitation of Cognitive Disabled Children: A Preliminary Study, Richard et. al., 2007]
  • 7.
    • For the application’s development, Microsoft Visual C++ 6.0 and OpenGL Library were used.
    • A webcam was used for pattern recognition.
    • 3D models built with 3DStudioMax.
    [Augmented Reality for Rehabilitation of Cognitive Disabled Children: A Preliminary Study, Richard et. al., 2007]
  • 8.
    • The research team end up with the conclusion that the application has many pedagogical purposes.
    • It is easy for teachers or parents to implement it at school or at home, respectively.
    • The application’s difficulty level can be adjusted to meet the demands from a wide range of ages.
    [Augmented Reality for Rehabilitation of Cognitive Disabled Children: A Preliminary Study, Richard et. al., 2007]
  • 9.
    • A research team used Augmented Reality to cope with a 25-year-old woman’s cockroach phobia. Virtual cockroaches were displayed on the woman’s hands. After some sessions, her phobia for cockroaches has been eliminated.
    [Fig. 3, Computers in Human Behavior, Botella et. al., 2009] [Computers in Human Behavior, Botella et. al., 2009]
  • 10.
    • A camera attached at woman’s head-mounted display (HMD) enabled her to see the real world around her.
    • A relatively old fashioned computer added the virtual cockroaches that were designed using 3DStudio and exported in VRML format to the environment.
    [Treating Cockroach Phobia With Augmented Reality, Botella et. al., 2010] [Fig. 1, Treating Cockroach Phobia With Augmented Reality, Botella et. al., 2010]
  • 11.
    • Post-stroke therapy carried out in an enhanced environment, leads to faster rehabilitation.
    • The fact that Augmented Reality system automates some therapy procedures, allows therapist to supervise more patients simultaneously.
    • The patient can see his hand moving into a virtual environment, through a Head Mounted Display (HMD).
    [Evaluating the Post-Stroke Patients Progress Using an Augmented Reality Rehabilitation System, Alamri et. al., 2009]
  • 12.
    • The necessary equipment is the following:
      • A webcam
      • A head mounted display (HMD)
      • A data glove
      • The decision support engine
    • The webcam captures the real environment.
    • The head mounted display renders the processed scene back to the patient.
    [Evaluating the Post-Stroke Patients Progress Using an Augmented Reality Rehabilitation System, Alamri et. al., 2009]
  • 13.
    • The first exercise asks the patient to move a mug numerous times, back and forth a shelf.
    • The patient must follow the path provided by the PC.
    • The PC program fills randomly the shelf with virtual objects.
    [Evaluating the Post-Stroke Patients Progress Using an Augmented Reality Rehabilitation System, Alamri et. al., 2009]
  • 14.
    • In the second exercise, the patient has to move a real object into 3 dimensions, following a predefined plot.
    • The exercise reviews the patient’s ability to keep the hand as steady as possible.
    [Evaluating the Post-Stroke Patients Progress Using an Augmented Reality Rehabilitation System, Alamri et. al., 2009]
  • 15.
    • Using ultrasonic sensors to generate a 3-D baby’s model.
    • Ability to examine the fetus and plan a Caesarean in advance with high accuracy and completely harmless.
    Fig. 2, Virtual fetus inside womb of pregnant patient. [A Survey of Augmented Reality, Ronald T. Azuma, 1997]
  • 16.
    • Using Augmented Reality to help guide the needle during a breast tumor biopsy.
    • More accurate results
    • Less error chances
    [A Survey of Augmented Reality, Ronald T. Azuma, 1997] Fig. 3, Mockup of breast tumor biopsy.
  • 17.
    • Augmented reality can be used to forestall traffic accidents. Road-line highlighting and closing car notification are only some examples.
    • For many years Augmented Reality is used at football courts to help referees with their decisions.
    Photos: motorauthority.com augmented.org
  • 18.
    • People with special skills can be extremely assisted in their everyday life while Augmented Reality is able to ease their pain.
    • New elements and devices enable and improve clinical utility of evidence-based treatments.
    • Mobile devices interventions can assist with management of chronic diseases.
    • Augmented Reality can be used for improving physical activity & kinesiology.
    [Evaluating the Post-Stroke Patients Progress Using an Augmented Reality Rehabilitation System, Alamri et. al., 2009]
  • 19.
    • Mental reaction in front of virtual entities of disabled children.
    • Improving children decision making through 2D & 3D plant entities.
    • Autistic & trisomic children could express positive emotions.
    • New teaching methods can be developed with emphasis on disabled children using more playful ways.
    [Augmented Reality for Rehabilitation of Cognitive Disabled Children: A Preliminary Study, Richard et. al., 2007]
  • 20.
    • Children treatment for emotional problems using cognitive behavior therapy principles & augmented reality.
    • Augmented Reality is a really promising scientific field that involves numerous specialties.
    • Further Research & Development in Augmented Reality is imperative.
    [A Survey of Augmented Reality, Ronald T. Azuma, 1997]
  • 21.