Mise en place
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Mise en place

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    Mise en place Mise en place Presentation Transcript

    • Mise En Place
    • • [ meez-on-plass] , literally "put in place" is a French meaning“ everything in place", as in set up. • It is used in professional kitchens to refer to the ingredients, such as cuts of meat, relishes, sauces, par-cooked items, spices, freshly chopped vegetables, and other components that a cook requires for the menu items that they expect to prepare during their shift.
    • Set up your work area safely and completely before you start to work Gather items necessary to keep your work area safe and clean Gather the appropriate portioning and storage Keep foods at the best possible temperature for prep work materials
    • Planning and Organizing Production 1) Assemble your tools 2) Assemble your ingredients 3) Wash, trim, cut, prepare, and measure raw materials 4) Prepare your equipment 5) Pre heat the oven, line baking sheets, etc.
    • Using Your Knife Safely: 1) Use the correct knife for the task at hand 2) Always cut away from yourself 3) Always cut on a cutting board 4) Keep knives sharp 5) When carrying a knife, hold it point down 6) Don’t attempt to catch a falling knife 7) Never leave a knife in a sink of water
    • Handling the Knife • The Grip – gives you maximum control over the knife. The proper grip increases your cutting accuracy and speed, it prevents slipping , lessens the chance of accident. • The Guiding Hand – 1) Hold the item being cut firmly 2) Guide the knife
    • 4 Basic Grips • Grip the handle with all four fingers and hold the • thumb gently but firmly against the blade’s spine
    • 4 Basic Grips • Grip the handle with all four fingers and hold the • thumb gently but firmly against the side of the blade
    • 4 Basic Grips • Grip the handle with three fingers, rest the index finger • flat against the blade on one side, and hold the thumb • on the opposite side to give additional stability
    • 4 Basic Grips • Grip the handle overhand, with the knife held • vertically – this grip is used with a boning knife for • meat fabrication tasks
    • THE GUIDING HAND
    • • The fingertips are tucked under slightly and hold the object, with the thumb held back from the fingertips. The knife blade then rests against the knuckles, preventing the fingers • from being cut.
    • • When you peel or trim foods, cut them into tournées, or flute them, you may find yourself holding the food in the air, above the cutting surface. In that case, the guiding hand holds and turns the food against the blade to make the work more efficient
    • • cutting techniques, such as butterflying meats or slicing a bagel in half, call forthe guiding hand to be placed on top of the food to keep it from slipping, while the cut • is made into the food parallel or at an angle to the work surface
    • BASIC KNIFE CUTS
    • Trimming, Paring, Peeling • Trimming - removing root and stem ends from fruits, herbs, and vegetables. • Peeling - to strip off an outer layer using hand or peeler • Paring - cutting away an edge or surface using a knife
    • DICE • LARGE DICE - measuring ¾ inch × ¾ inch × ¾ inch • MEDIUM DICE – ½ inch x ½ inch x ½ inch • SMALL DICE – • ¼ inch x ¼ inch x ¼ inch
    • BATONNET • Pronunciation: bah- tow-NAY • measures ½ inch × ½ inch × 2½-3 inches.
    • Brunoise • ( BROON-wahz) • measures 1/8 inch × 1/8 inch × 1/8 inch.
    • Allumette • (al-yoo-MET) •   measuring • ¼ inch × ¼ inch × 2½ inches. • Also Known  As: Matchstick cut
    • Julienne • (joo-lee-ENN) • measuring 1/8 inch × 1/8 inch × 2½ inches. FINE JULIENNE 1/16 inch × 1/16 inch × 2 inches.
    • Brunoise • (pronounced BROON- wahz) • 1/8 inch × 1/8 inch × 1/8 inch. • FINE BRUNOISE • 1/16 inch × 1/16 inch × 1/16 inch.
    • MINCED • chop very fine pieces
    • Rondelle • slant and thin • Cut to desired thickness, 1/8 to 1/2 inch • (4 to 12 millimeters)
    • Chop Irregular shaped pieces
    • Jardinere • A long thin baton, about 2cm long and approximately 3mm wide and 3mm thick. They can be slightly larger depending on their use.
    • Macedoine • This is a diced cube, 0.5cm (5mm) square, which is larger than the brunoise cut. Typical vegetables used are carrot, onion, turnip, beans and celery.
    • Matignon • Roughly cut vegetables cooked in butter with ham, thyme and bayleaf, finished by deglazing the pan with a little Maderia
    • Paysanne • 1/2 x 1/2 x 1/8 inch • (12 x 12 x 4 millimeters)
    • FERMIÈRE • Cut to desired thickness, 1/8 to 1/2 inch (4 to 12 millimeters)
    • LOZENGE • Diamond shape, 1/2 x 1/2 x 1/8 inch • (12 x 12 x 4 millimeters)
    • TOURNÉ • Approximately 2 inches (50 millimeters) long • with seven faces