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Introduction To Scrum

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This power point presentation is an introduction to Scrum and covers the following topics: …

This power point presentation is an introduction to Scrum and covers the following topics:

* Problems with a traditional approach
* What is Scrum?
* Why use Scrum?
* How does Scrum work?
* The Product Owner
* The Scrum Master
* The Team
* The Product Backlog
* Benefits of using a Product Backlog
* The Sprint Backlog
* The Scrum Cycle
* The Burn Down Chart

You can copy, distribute, and use the content of the presentation in accordance to Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 License.

Published in: Technology, Business

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  • 1. THIS WORK IS LICENSED UNDER A  CREATIVE COMMONS ATTRIBUTION 2.5 LICENSE , WHICH MEANS YOU CAN COPY, DISTRIBUTE, AND USE THE CONTENT INCLUDING IN COMMERCIAL AND DERIVATIVE WORKS AS LONG AS YOU INCLUDE ATTRIBUTION TO MARTIN PROULX OR PYXIS TECHNOLOGIES . Introduction to Scrum
  • 2. Problems with a traditional approach
    • Team does not deliver on time - misses deadlines
      • Cannot anticipate issues
      • Difficulty in properly estimating efforts
      • Problems are found late in the development cycle
    • Project costs more than expected - exceeds budget
      • Project driven by features and not by value
      • Frequent changes throughout the project
      • Time spent on non-value added activities
    • Requirements are not met – changes to scope
      • Requirements not defined properly
      • Requirements not understood properly
      • Users do not know what they need
  • 3. What is Scrum?
    • Scrum is an Agile project management process that uses an iterative and incremental approach to deliver optimal business value in the context of software development projects.
  • 4. Why use Scrum?
    • Increases success rate of project by delivering “the highest business value features first and will avoid building features that will never be used by the customer” – Scrum Alliance
      • Improve productivity
      • Early identification of problems
      • Remove impediments during the development cycle
      • Provide autonomy from management pressures
      • Cope with change requests
      • Increase customer satisfaction
  • 5. How does Scrum work?
    • Three fundamental roles in Scrum
      • The Product Owner
      • The Scrum Master
      • The Team
  • 6. The Product Owner
    • Responsible for the project’s success;
    • Leads the development effort by conveying his or her vision to the team, outlining, and prioritizing it based on business value;
    • Represents the interests of everyone with a stake in the resulting project;
    • Shoulders all the responsibility for the project success and is ultimately responsible to the Team, stakeholders and to the company.
  • 7. The Product Owner
    • Creates, maintains, prioritizes and sequences the Product Backlog according to business value or ROI;
    • Conveys the Vision and Goals at the beginning of every Release and Sprint;
    • Participates in the daily Scrums, Sprint Planning Meetings and Sprint Reviews and Retrospectives;
    • Inspects the product progress at the end of every Sprint and has complete authority to accept or reject the work done;
    • Can change the course of the project at the end of every Sprint;
    • Communicates status externally;
    • Understands and communicates the customer needs;
    • Meets the project goal and financial targets;
    • Collaborates with the team and aligns with the stakeholders throughout the entire release;
    • Assists with the elaboration of user stories.
  • 8. The Scrum Master
    • As an Agile Project Manager, the Scrum Master is the person responsible to ensure the adoption and adherence to the Scrum process.
    • With no formal authority over the Team, the Scrum Master facilitates the various activities and maintains the Burn Down Chart. 
  • 9. The Scrum Master
    • Helps the team maintain their productivity by removing barriers and preventing interferences;
    • Supports the Product Owner in achieving the project's goals;
    • Facilitates communication between the Product Owner and the Team;
    • Updates the Burn Down charts and other artefacts to make team progress visible;
    • Organizes and facilitates the key meetings: definition, planning, building, demonstration, and retrospection.
  • 10. The Team
    • The Scrum Team is a self-organized group of up-to 7 individuals with no pre-defined roles who work in collaboration to deliver upon their commitments.
    • The Scrum Team is often comprised of cross-functional individuals who work to successfully complete the activities identified as part of the sprint backlog.
  • 11. The Team
    • Following a negotiation with the Product Owner, selects the goal of the sprint;
    • Organizes itself and its work;
    • Plans and executes the tasks identified during the Sprint Planning Meeting;
    • Determines the appropriate methods of delivering on their commitments;
    • Presents the resulting work to the Product Owner.
  • 12. The Product Backlog
    • A list of customer requirements needed to complete the project and sorted by business value.
    • It is initially prepared at the beginning of a project by the Product Owner and remains active throughout the duration of the project as completed items get removed while new items are added.
  • 13. Benefits of using a Product Backlog
    • It’s a simple list, discussed face-to-face;
    • It provides the customer with control;
    • The product backlog is allowed to change;
    • Inspection and adaptation;
    • It resolves dependencies timely;
    • It allows for some longer term planning.
  • 14. The Sprint Backlog
    • The Sprint Backlog is a list of tasks that the Scrum team is committing to deliver within the current Sprint. 
    • The Sprint Backlog is a simple list of the tasks that must executed by the team in order to deliver an increment of functional software at the end of the Sprint.
  • 15. Scrum Cycle (2-4 weeks) Product Backlog Sprint Backlog Completed Work
  • 16. The Scrum Cycle
    • Define:
      • During the definition phase, the project team (the Scrum Master and the Scrum Team) meets with the Product Owner to determine and agree on the priority of the team for the duration of the sprint. The intent is not to agree on the details during this stage but the high level direction the team will follow. The outcome of the definition stage is to start populating a product backlog.
    • Plan:
      • Planning consists of selecting the high level items from the product backlog and evaluate the value of the various items as well as the estimated efforts to complete the work. As part of a negotiation process between the Product Owner and the Scrum Team, a subset of the product backlog is selected which is then called the Sprint Backlog.
    • Build:
      • The development team members select and execute tasks from the Sprint Backlog until all work is completed and a "product" is ready to present to the Product Owner.
    • Review:
      • At the end of each sprint, the Scrum Team presents the various items that have been developed during the sprint to the Product Owner. This practice has a few clear benefits in that unless metrics can be demonstrated in the application – not on paper or in theory – and shown to provide the expected information, they are not completed.
    • Retrospect:
      • The retrospection allows the team to reflect on the successes and determines which areas need to be improved prior to entering the next sprint. As such, the team collectively assesses its own performance and determine the best way to adapt in order to successfully achieve its next sprint.
  • 17. The Burn Down Chart
    • A burn-down chart is a graphical representation that shows the progress made during the development cycle.
    • The Burn Down Chart can be used to show outstanding work for a release or for a sprint and in both cases, the chart represents the amount of work remaining for the completion of the release or sprint versus time.