Katho New Media course evaluation May11

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  • 1. 
 
 New
Media
 ‐
the
challenge
for
traditional
media,
 advertisers
and
communicators
‐
 
 
 
 
 Erasmus
Course
Evaluation
 
 
 Lecturer:
Ana
ADI
 
 
 
 
 Session
2010/2011
 Semester
2
–
May
2011


  • 2. At
 the
 end
 of
 the
 New
 Media
 course,
 the
 14
 participating
 students
 were
 asked
 to
take
a
survey
in
order
to
evaluate
the
New
Media
course
together
with
the
lecturer’s
method,
 approach
 and
 enthusiasm.
 The
 evaluation
 survey
 was
 accessible
 online
leaving
students
with
the
option
of
taking
it
at
their
own
pace
and
in
the
absence
of
the
lecturer.
To
avoid
bias,
students
were
asked
to
submit
their
answers
before
their
final
 grades
 were
 delivered.
 13
 out
 of
 the
 total
 of
 14
 participating
 students
 in
 the
course
took
the
survey,
offering
responses
from
92.8%%
of
the
course
participants.
The
survey’s
structure
of
the
previous
semesters
has
been
maintained.

Overall,
71%
of
the
students
(10
out
of
the
13
 respondents)
found
the
course,
the
overall
content
and
the
overall
teaching
effectives
as
“very
good”.
All
other
answers
recorded
rated
the
course
as
“good”
or
“excellent”.

 
 1.
Overall
course
evaluation
results
 
Asked
 to
 evaluate
 specific
 aspects
 of
 the
 course
 or
 the
 teaching
 process,
 the
students
 responses
 confirm
 the
 high
 evaluations
 of
 the
 overall
 course
 as
 most
 of
their
answers
provide
“excellent”
or
“very
good
ratings”.
The
lecturer’s
enthusiasm,
the
 lecturer’s
 use
 of
 technology
 and
 the
 Skype
 online
 live
 video
 guest
 lectures
obtained
most
of
the
“excellent”
ratings
from
the
students
followed
by
the
lecturer’s
availability
to
answer
questions,
the
lecturer’s
answer
to
the
students’
questions
and
the
integration
of
other
lecturers
and
guests
within
the
course.
This
could
 indicate
that
 providing
 some
 diversity
 in
 the
 way
 content
 is
 delivered
 has
 a
 potential
 to
maintain
the
students’
interest
in
the
course.


  • 3. 
 2.
Specific
course
elements
evaluation



As
with
previous
sessions,
two
online
 live
video
 guest
lecturers
were
set
up.
While
the
 connection
 to
 the
 USA
 via
 Skype
 was
 successful,
 technical
 difficulties
 were
encountered
 with
 the
 connection
 to
 Bahrain.
 This
 led
 to
 the
 Bahrain
 guests
continuing
their
interaction
with
the
class
via
chat
and
Twitter.


Similar
with
the
previous
sessions,
the
online
live
video
lectures
were
regarded
as
a
novelty
as
well
as
a
great
way
to
integrate
new
media
in
the
class.


  • 4. 
 3.Online
video
guest
lecture
evaluation
 
 
Among
other
aspects
of
the
course
evaluated
were
the
use
of
the
class
time
(46.15%
very
 good),
 the
 relevance
 and
 usefulness
 of
 the
 course
 content
 (53.84%
 excellent)
and
the
balance
between
theory
and
practice
(53.84%
excellent).


 
 4.
Other
course
dimensions
evaluated


With
regards
to
attendance,
all
responding
students
attended
all
classes.
Almost
half
of
the
responding
students
(6
out
of
10)
expect
to
receive
an
A.


  • 5. Three
qualitative
questions
were
part
of
the
survey
as
well.
They
aimed
to
determine
the
 areas
 that
 students
 most
 liked
 or
 disliked
 as
 well
 as
 identify
 elements
 that
students
would
have
wanted
the
course
to
cover.
Even
with
the
course
covering
7
sessions
 at
 a
 total
 of
 24
 hours
 of
 contact,
 some
 students
 suggested
 the
 course
 to
take
 even
 longer
 or
 to
 be
 scheduled
 in
 such
 a
 way
 as
 to
 provide
 them
 with
 some
decompression
and/or
reflection
time.


Other
suggestions
included
more
examples
and
 practice
with
new
media
tools
and
platforms
(beyond
micro‐blogging,
blogging
and
social
media
analytics
tools)
as
well
as
more
business
related
examples.
These
suggestions
ill
 be
taken
into
account
for
future
deliveries
of
the
course.



 
 5.
New
course
elements
wanted
 
One
the
changes
suggested
makes
reference
to
the
new
media
impact
on
journalism
day
 and
 practice.
 Taking
 into
 account
 that
 most
 students
 in
 this
 semester
 had
 a
background
 in
 business
 and/or
 business
 administration,
 their
 suggestion
 reflects
their
 different
 subject
 interests
 as
 well
 as
 their
 little
 impact
 with
 journalism.
However,
 discussing
 about
 creative
 industries
 and
 new
 media
 production
 and
influence
without
making
reference
to
journalism,
citizen
journalism
would
depict
an
incomplete
picture.
In
order
to
incorporate
the
students’
suggestions,
the
journalism
exercises
will
be
redesigned
to
include
a
more
business
angles.


  • 6. 
 
 6.
Suggested
improvements
 
 
Finally,
among
the
things
the
students
liked
the
most
were
the
practice‐based‐days,
the
discussions
they
generated
and
the
final
project.

 

  • 7. 
 7.
“What
did
you
like
more
about
this
course”
answers
 
 
Observations
and
Conclusions:
All
the
answers
given
to
the
questions
asked
are
in
the
higher
positive
range
–
from
good
to
excellent.


The
areas
marked
the
students
as
being
excellent
(obtaining
also
the
majority
vote)
were:
 • The
lecturer’s
use
of
technology
(100%)
 • The
lecturer’s
enthusiasm
(84.6%)
 • 
The
practical
aspects
of
the
course
were
mentioned
as
strong
points
of
the
course
and
good
 learning
experiences.
It
should
be
 noted
that
this
semester
featured
one
individual
 assignment
 and
 two
 teamwork
 assignments
 including
 the
 final
 team‐project.
 To
 showcase
 the
 student’s
 assignments
 the
 students
 chose
 wordpress
 as
their
showcase
platform:

http://kathonewmedia.wordpress.com

The
students
final
projects
will
also
be
shown
on
in
this
space.



  • 8. It
is
notable
that
many
of
the
students
indicate
as
an
important
factor
the
lecturer’s
enthusiasm
 and
 support.
 As
 with
 previous
 semesters,
 this
 shows
 reiterates
 the
potential,
 if
 not
 the
 need,
 for
 courses
 to
 be
 delivered
 in
 a
 more
 interactive
 way
where
students
are
constantly
given
challenges
to
solve
together
with
the
lecturer.
Having
a
problem‐based
learning
approach
in
this
case
is
perhaps
the
best
solution,
ensuring
the
students
apply
and/or
discover
the
content
they
need
in
order
to
fulfil
their
tasks.



When
it
comes
to
the
use
of
technology,
even
three
years
since
the
course
was
first
offered,
the
online
live
video
guest
lectures
obtained
still
a
very
positive
evaluation
even
from
a
group
who
is
accustomed
to
using
online
live
video
streaming
platforms
for
 personal
 uses.
 As
 with
 the
 previous
 semester,
 the
 responses
 indicate
 that
 the
transfer
 of
 knowledge,
 dialogue
 as
 well
 as
 learning
 objectives
 could
 be
 achieved
regardless
of
the
presence
in
class
of
the
lecturer.
Furthermore,
the
good
evaluation
the
 online
 live
 video
 lectures
 received
 show
 that
 students
 appreciate
 contact
 with
industry
experts
and
other
lecturers
that
live
and
operate
outside
their
countries.


Recommendations
and
suggestions:

Taking
into
account
the
students’
observations
and
in
an
attempt
to
make
a
link
to
the
areas
determined
in
the
course
evaluation
as
having
a
potential
for
improvement
it
is
suggested:
 • A
 redesign
 of
 the
 journalism
 related
 exercises
 to
 be
 more
 relevant
 to
 business
students
 • The
 introduction
 of
 more
 practice
 days
 related
 to
 other
 technologies
 and
 platforms
 • The
presentation
of
more
new/social
media
statistics
and
inforgraphics
as
a
 way
of
showing
changes
in
media
consumption
behaviours
 • The
 introduction
 of
 more
 discussions
 and
 debates
 about
 the
 future
 of
 internet,
the
impact
of
internet
on
cultural
and
political
dialogue,
privacy
and
 security

 • An
 expansion
 of
 the
 New
 Media
 course
 to
 local
 students
 as
 well
 (not
 necessarily
in
the
same
classroom).