RESEARCH PAPERSJANUARY 10, 2013Texas Write SourcePages 386-450
Four Step ProcessStep Three: Synthesize InformationPage 389
Begin to Put it All Together   After researching and investigating, decide if the main question is too broad or    too na...
Four Step ProcessStep Four: Organize & Present Your IdeasPage 389
Now Write   Once you’ve completed your research, synthesize (put together) the information    in a well-organized, meanin...
Using SourcesPrimary vs. Secondary SourcesPage 390
Primary vs. Secondary Sources   Primary Sources are original sources which provide firsthand information from those    di...
Evaluating Sources   Remember how important reliable sources are. Ask these questions to be sure your source    is a good...
HomeworkDue MONDAY, January 14, 2013• Worth 100 points!• Begin to think of a topic you might want to  write about. Brainst...
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Research Papers - Four Steps (continued) & Beginning to Use Sources

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Research Papers, Day Two - Four Step Process (continued); beginning to use outside sources

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  • Beginning course details and/or books/materials needed for a class/project.
  • Beginning course details and/or books/materials needed for a class/project.
  • Beginning course details and/or books/materials needed for a class/project.
  • Beginning course details and/or books/materials needed for a class/project.
  • Research Papers - Four Steps (continued) & Beginning to Use Sources

    1. 1. RESEARCH PAPERSJANUARY 10, 2013Texas Write SourcePages 386-450
    2. 2. Four Step ProcessStep Three: Synthesize InformationPage 389
    3. 3. Begin to Put it All Together After researching and investigating, decide if the main question is too broad or too narrow. Think about these questions:  Did you have trouble figuring out what information to gather?  Did you take lots of notes but still not know what was important?  If so, your topic may be too broad. Use the information you’ve already gathered to find a more specific area of focus. Then revise your main question to be more focused, also.  Did you answer your questions in a few seconds?  Did you have trouble finding enough sources?  If so, your topic may be too narrow. You need to think about how to broaden your topic to cover more information. How can you revise these questions to be more or less specific? What is the history of the United States government? How cold does it get in Antarctica?
    4. 4. Four Step ProcessStep Four: Organize & Present Your IdeasPage 389
    5. 5. Now Write Once you’ve completed your research, synthesize (put together) the information in a well-organized, meaningful format. Use these steps to help:  Categorize your facts and details under your main ideas or research questions.  Use evidence to explain your topic and give good reasons for your conclusions. Summarize or paraphrase, but don’t plagiarize.  Decide the best way to present your findings to help your audience understand the information. What statement might you make about people who explore Antarctica, based on these facts: The sun rises and sets once a year at the South Pole, making both day and night six months long. Antarctica is the coldest, windiest, and highest continent on Earth.
    6. 6. Using SourcesPrimary vs. Secondary SourcesPage 390
    7. 7. Primary vs. Secondary Sources Primary Sources are original sources which provide firsthand information from those directly involved.  Diaries, Journals, Letters  Presentations by Experts  Interviews  Surveys and Questionnaires  Observation and Participation Secondary Sources contain information that has been gathered by someone else. Non- fiction books, newspapers, magazines, etc. are all secondary sources.  Article  Internet Search Engine results  Library  Book About the Subject Figure out which works best for your particular project. Make a list of possible primary sources and possible secondary sources. Explain which would be most useful.
    8. 8. Evaluating Sources Remember how important reliable sources are. Ask these questions to be sure your source is a good one:  Is the source primary or secondary? Either can be useful, but firsthand facts are usually more trustworthy than secondhand facts (remember our “telephone” game).  Is the source an expert? You wouldn’t want your doctor to give you information on your car or your mechanic to diagnose your illness.  Is the information accurate? Use well-known and respected sources whenever possible because it is more likely to be checked and re-checked. Large well-known organizations and colleges and universities are usually good, legitimate sources.  Is the information current? Always look for the most recent source dealing with your topic to make sure the information is up to date.  Is the source biased? Be sure to present both sides of the issue or none. Do not let your research paper express an opinion for one side or the other. Which of these is the most useful and reliable? Our Solar System copyright 2009 The Planets copyright 1952
    9. 9. HomeworkDue MONDAY, January 14, 2013• Worth 100 points!• Begin to think of a topic you might want to write about. Brainstorm on it. Get ideas.• Bring your ideas to class, so I have a record of what you should be writing about.

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