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AMY HOOPINGARNER’S COURSE PROJECT
Walden University
EDUC-6706R-6 The Beginning Reader, Pre K-3
Dr. Phyllis Mccully

Welcom...
GETTING TO KNOW LITERACY LEARNERS






It is essential for teachers to get to know their students in order to understa...
SELECTING TEXTS


When it comes to selecting texts for students to read, it is important to know the literacy
learners in...
LITERACY LESSON: INTERACTIVE PERSPECTIVE
o The first lesson plan that I created focuses on the Interactive Perspective, wh...
LITERACY LESSON: INTERACTIVE PERSPECTIVE
Teacher: Mrs. Amy Hoopingarner
Date: February 3, 2014
Age/Grade Range; Developmen...
LITERACY LESSON: INTERACTIVE PERSPECTIVE
Adaptations for ELLs, Students with Special Needs, and/or Struggling Readers: The...
LITERACY LESSON: INTERACTIVE PERSPECTIVE
Lesson Sequence
Learning Activities
Introduction/Anticipatory Set
I will begin th...
LITERACY LESSON: INTERACTIVE PERSPECTIVE
Lesson Sequence
Learning Activities

Assessment Opportunities

Building/Applying ...
LITERACY LESSON: INTERACTIVE PERSPECTIVE
Extension/Enrichment/Transfer of Generalization of Knowledge:
As an extension to ...
LITERACY LESSON: CRITICAL AND RESPONSE
PERSPECTIVES
o The second lesson plan that I included focuses on the Critical and R...
LITERACY LESSON: CRITICAL AND RESPONSE
PERSPECTIVES
Teacher: Mrs. Amy Hoopingarner
Date: February 11, 2014
Age/Grade Range...
LITERACY LESSON: CRITICAL AND RESPONSE
PERSPECTIVES
Perspective(s) addressed in this lesson (Interactive, Critical, and/or...
LITERACY LESSON: CRITICAL AND RESPONSE PERSPECTIVES
Lesson Sequence

Learning Activities

Introduction/Anticipatory Set

I...
LITERACY LESSON: CRITICAL AND RESPONSE
PERSPECTIVES
Synthesis/Closure
I will close the lesson by bringing the group back t...
LITERACY LESSON: CRITICAL AND RESPONSE
PERSPECTIVES
References
Common Core Standards Initiative. (2010). English Language ...
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Transcript of "Amy Hoopingarner's Course Project power point"

  1. 1. AMY HOOPINGARNER’S COURSE PROJECT Walden University EDUC-6706R-6 The Beginning Reader, Pre K-3 Dr. Phyllis Mccully Welcome! This presentation will provide valuable information on how to create an effective literate environment in your classroom. You will find information on how to get to know the learners in your classroom and how to select appropriate texts for students to read. You will also find two lesson plans, which revolve around three important perspectives; the interactive, critical, and response perspectives. Thank you for taking the time to view this presentation.
  2. 2. GETTING TO KNOW LITERACY LEARNERS    It is essential for teachers to get to know their students in order to understand them as individuals and as learners. Dr. Janice Almasi mentioned that it is important to know that we are teaching students, not a text, and that we need to find out about the whole child and get to know them as a human being (Laureate Education, Inc., 2011a). In order to get to know the literacy learners in my classroom on a non-cognitive level, I gave students the Elementary Reading Attitude Survey (McKenna & Kear, 1990). This is a simple and fun survey for students to take and provides vital information about student’s attitude towards reading at school and reading for fun. This information was helpful and allowed me to get to know my students. I also chose to give running records to the students in my classroom for a cognitive assessment, which assesses fluency. I chose to take running records because they can reveal important information in regards to the Five Pillars, which include phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension (Laureate Education, Inc., 2011b). I also chose to ask comprehension questions that went along with the running record to gauge student understanding. References Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2011a). Getting to Know Your Students [Video webcast]. Retrieved from http://www.courseurl.com Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2011b). The Beginning Reader [Video webcast]. Retrieved from http://www.courseurl.com McKenna, M. C., & Kear, D. J. (1990). Measuring attitude toward reading: A new tool for teachers. The Reading Teacher, 43(9), 626-639.
  3. 3. SELECTING TEXTS  When it comes to selecting texts for students to read, it is important to know the literacy learners in your class, including their interests and reading levels. In order to analyze and select texts for students, a helpful tool to use is the literacy matrix below, as mentioned by Dr. Douglas Hartman (Laureate Education, Inc., 2011). Linguistic Narrative Informational Semiotic  This matrix includes four types of text, including narrative, informational, linguistic, and semiotic. With linguistic texts, there are more words as opposed to semiotic texts, which include more pictures and diagrams. Teachers can place a text in one of the four quadrants and can get a better picture of the readability of the text. Teachers can also use this information when planning lessons and learning goals for their students. Dr. Janice Almasi mentioned that teachers must also consider the dimension of difficulty of text used in the classroom, which includes the readability of text, length of text, text structure, size of print, and visual supports (Laureate Education, Inc., 2011). Once teachers select texts for students, they must choose how to use the texts in an effective way that will challenge and improve student’s literacy levels. This information was essential and helped me to select texts for my students to read. References Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2011a). Analyzing and Selecting Text [Video webcast]. Retrieved from http://www.courseurl.com
  4. 4. LITERACY LESSON: INTERACTIVE PERSPECTIVE o The first lesson plan that I created focuses on the Interactive Perspective, which is included in the next portion of the presentation. According to Dr. Janice Almasi, the ultimate goal of the Interactive Perspective is to teach children how to be literate learners who can navigate the textual world independently (Laureate Education, Inc., 2011). The Interactive Perspective also helps students to become strategic thinkers and to be metacognitive while reading. The lesson that I created was Titanic themed. Students read the book National Geographic Readers: Titanic during this lesson and completed tasks to go along with this book (Stewart, 2012). Students filled out a K-W-L graphic organizer as a pre-assessment and completed an inferencing and vocabulary activity as a formative assessment. Lastly, students wrote the main idea and a short summary of the book as a summative assessment. I focused on the Interactive Perspective throughout this lesson by discussing strategies for reading informational text. Students were able to navigate through the text and pointed out text features, such as pictures, diagrams, and quotes. Overall, I felt great after teaching this lesson. My students enjoyed reading this book and were able to meet the learning objectives. By using the Interactive Perspective in this lesson, my students were able to connect to this text and read and understand it with few problems. References Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2011a). Strategic Processing through Interactive Perspective [Video Webcast]. Retrieved from http://www.courseurl.com Stewart, M. (2012). National geographic readers: Titanic. Washington, D.C.: National Geographic Society.
  5. 5. LITERACY LESSON: INTERACTIVE PERSPECTIVE Teacher: Mrs. Amy Hoopingarner Date: February 3, 2014 Age/Grade Range; Developmental Level(s): Fourth grade, transitional to beginning fluent stages of reading development. Anticipated Lesson Duration: Titanic Unit will range from three to four weeks, but this particular lesson will take between 65-70 minutes. Lesson Foundations Pre-assessment (including cognitive and noncognitive measures): In order to assess my students on what they already know, I will ask them to fill out a K-W-L chart. I will have them write down things that they know about the Titanic and what they want to learn about the Titanic. As we progress through this unit, I will ask students to write down things that they learn about the Titanic on their chart. Curricular Focus, Theme, or Subject Area: The theme of this unit is the Titanic. Students will be reading informational and fictional text that revolves around the Titanic. This lesson only covers a small portion of this unit. State/District Standards:  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.4.1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.4.2 Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text.  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.4.4 Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topic or subject area. (Common Core State Standards Initiative, 2010) Learning Objectives: Students will be able to... 1. Refer to details and examples in the text when drawing inferences from the text. 2. Determine the main idea of the text. 3. Summarize the text in five to seven sentences. 4. Determine the meaning of vocabulary words in the text. Page 1
  6. 6. LITERACY LESSON: INTERACTIVE PERSPECTIVE Adaptations for ELLs, Students with Special Needs, and/or Struggling Readers: There are no ELL students in my class. I chose three students who are in the transitional to beginning fluent stage of reading development. I chose a text that these students will be able to read with guidance from the teacher or paraprofessional. The focus students will work in a guided reading group throughout the unit. There will be times where they will work individually as well. Assistance will be provided as needed. There will be an online text included in this unit, which allows students to hear the text read aloud. Perspective(s) addressed in this lesson (Interactive, Critical, and/or Response): The interactive, critical, and response perspective will be covered throughout this unit. I will focus on the interactive perspective during this particular lesson within the unit. Texts: The text that I will use in this introductory lesson is titled National Geographic Readers: Titanic, written by Melissa Stewart (Stewart, 2012). This is a short, informational text is the perfect introduction to the unit on the Titanic. It is an easier read and offers exciting facts and historical information about the Titanic. Other Materials/Technology/Equipment/Resources: I will provide a copy of the K-W-L chart for each student. Each student will receive the book National Geographic Readers: Titanic (Stewart, 2012). Students will use their reading journals throughout the lesson. Lastly, students will require the use of a dictionary or computer to look up definitions of vocabulary words. Grouping structures (one-on-one, small group, whole class): I will begin the lesson with the entire class and explain the learning targets and activities that will take place. I will then divide the students into small groups based upon ability level. Page 2
  7. 7. LITERACY LESSON: INTERACTIVE PERSPECTIVE Lesson Sequence Learning Activities Introduction/Anticipatory Set I will begin the lesson by instructing each student to fill out the first two portions of the K-W-L chart independently, which includes what is known and what they would like to know about the Titanic. After students complete this chart, I will begin a group discussion about the Titanic. I will encourage students to share what they wrote on their chart. I will then tell students that they will have opportunities to fill in what they learned about the Titanic through the lesson and unit. After student finish discussing the K-W-L chart, I will introduce the learning targets and discuss what they will be doing during the lesson. I will briefly go over inferring, vocabulary, main idea, and what goes into an informational summary. I will also ask students to recall reading strategies for informational text. I will discuss these strategies briefly with the students and stress that they are learning to become metacognitive thinkers and should choose strategies that work for reading informational text. Assessment Opportunities The K-W-L chart will serve as a formative assessment. As students independently work on their charts, I will walk around and note the students who have a lot of schema about the Titanic and those who do not have as much schema. I will also note those that are confused or who are not working at all. I will encourage those students to do the best that they can. Page 3
  8. 8. LITERACY LESSON: INTERACTIVE PERSPECTIVE Lesson Sequence Learning Activities Assessment Opportunities Building/Applying Knowledge and Skills I will go around to each group and discuss the tasks that they will be doing within their group.  Each student will take turns reading 1-2 pages of the book. As they read, students will individually write down at least three inferences that they made while reading in their reading journal. As students make their inferences, they will discuss why they made it with their group and then continue to read and see if their guess is answered in the following pages.  Students will individually choose at least three important vocabulary words from the book and write them down in their reading journal. Students will define these words after their group is done reading the book. I will allow students to use a dictionary or a website like www.dictionary.com to define their vocabulary words.  Students will independently write down the main idea of the text in their journal, as well as a 5-7 sentence summary of the text. This will serve as a summative assessment.  I will collect each student’s writing journal and collect data from the entire lesson. After I have discussed these tasks with each group, I will begin to work with my focus students. I will discuss each task and answer any questions that they may have. I will then begin a guided reading group. I will have them do similar things that the other groups are doing, but will provide more assistance. As they choose their vocabulary words, I will ask students to guess what the definition might be. I will also ask students to explain their inferences and will discuss each inference with the group. I will ask these students to independently write down the main idea and a five to seven sentence summary, which will serve as a summative assessment. The inference and the vocabulary tasks will serve as a formative assessment. Synthesis/Closure I will close this lesson by talking to the whole group about what they learned after reading the book. I will ask students to recall some of the inferences they made, interesting vocabulary words they defined, as well as their guesses of the main idea of the text. I will then ask students to pull out their K-W-L chart and add things that they learned after reading this text. I will have students keep their charts as they will be adding more information throughout the unit. I will inform students that they will begin reading a historical fiction text titled I Survived the Sinking of the Titanic: 1912 during the next class period (Tarshis, 2010). I will also briefly mention another online article they will read, titled How do you Find a Sunken Ship? (“How do you,” 2014). I will assess student’s comprehension and knowledge of the text throughout this portion of the lesson. The main idea and the summary task will serve as a summative assessment. Page 1 I will also assess student’s knowledge of inferring, vocabulary, and main idea. Page 4
  9. 9. LITERACY LESSON: INTERACTIVE PERSPECTIVE Extension/Enrichment/Transfer of Generalization of Knowledge: As an extension to this lesson, I will allow students to create a digital summary. After they write their summary of the book, I will allow students to work with a partner to video tape each other’s summaries. I have a small video camera that is available for students to use. They would upload their summary to the computer and would have the option to add it to a Power Point or Google Documents presentation. They would also have the option to add text and pictures to their presentation as well. I will allow them to present their summaries to the class. Another extension/enrichment activity for this lesson would be exploring the Titanic Interactive website provided by the History Channel. The web address for this site is http://www.history.com/interactives/titanic-interactive (“Titanic interactive,” 2014). This website includes rare images of the Titanic, an animation of the ship wreck, and video clips of several survivors. I would allow students to explore this site. After they finish, I would have them write one to two paragraphs of what they would feel like to be a survivor of the Titanic in their reading journals. References Common Core Standards Initiative. (2010). English Language Arts Standards: Reading: Informational Text: Grade 4. Retrieved from http://www.corestandards.org/ELALiteracy/RI/4 How do you find a sunken ship? (2014). Retrieved from http://wonderopolis.org/wonder/how-doyou-find-a-sunken-ship/ Stewart, M. (2012). National geographic readers: Titanic. Washington, D.C.: National Geographic Society. Tarshis, L. (2010). I survived the sinking of the titanic, 1912. New York, NY: Scholastic Inc. Page 5
  10. 10. LITERACY LESSON: CRITICAL AND RESPONSE PERSPECTIVES o The second lesson plan that I included focuses on the Critical and Response Perspectives. According to Dr. Almasi, the Critical Perspective allows students to examine the text from multiple perspectives, critically evaluate text, and judge the validity of text (Laureate Education, Inc., 2011a). The Response Perspective focuses on students responding to text and allowing students the chance to be transformed by text that is read (Laureate Education, Inc., 2011b). These perspectives work well together and allow students to comprehend and engage with text that they read. This lesson is included in the same unit as the first lesson plan in this presentation. I chose to have my students read the novel I Survived the Sinking of the Titanic, 1912 (Tarshis, 2010). I chose to use a preview and predict activity for a formative assessment, as well as a character poster and opinion paragraph for summative assessments. I focused on the Critical and Response Perspectives throughout this lesson by allowing students to think critically about a character in this book and a chance to respond to what they read. This lesson went extremely well and I felt confident that students understood the perspectives that were presented. I plan on incorporating these perspectives daily in my lesson plans. References Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2011a). Critical perspective [Video webcast]. Retrieved from http://www.courseurl.com Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2011b). Response perspective [Video webcast]. Retrieved from http://www.courseurl.com Tarshis, L. (2010). I survived the sinking of the titanic, 1912. New York, NY: Scholastic Inc.
  11. 11. LITERACY LESSON: CRITICAL AND RESPONSE PERSPECTIVES Teacher: Mrs. Amy Hoopingarner Date: February 11, 2014 Age/Grade Range; Developmental Level(s): Fourth grade, transitional to beginning fluent stages of reading development. Anticipated Lesson Duration: Titanic Unit will range from three to four weeks, but this particular lesson will take between 65-70 minutes. Lesson Foundations Pre-assessment (including cognitive and non-cognitive measures): As a pre-assessment, I will have my students complete a preview and predict activity. I will pass out a copy of the chapter book I Survived the Sinking of the Titanic to each student and ask them to look at the front cover (Tarshis, 2010). Then, I will ask them to write down their predictions about the book in their reading journal. I will encourage students to describe the time and place of the picture, who the characters might be, and any other important information that they may guess. I will read their writing journals after they finish the pre-assessment and take notes on student’s predictions. Curricular Focus, Theme, or Subject Area: The theme of this unit is the Titanic. Students will read informational and narrative text about the Titanic and sinking of the Titanic throughout this unit. Students began reading a narrative text this week, which is the focus of this lesson. State/District Standards:  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.3: Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.1: Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information. (Common Core State Standards Initiative, 2010) Learning Objectives: 1. Students will think critically and describe a character, setting, or event in the story, making sure to use specific details in the text. 2. Students will respond to text by writing an opinion piece, supporting their point of view with reasons and information from the text. Page 1
  12. 12. LITERACY LESSON: CRITICAL AND RESPONSE PERSPECTIVES Perspective(s) addressed in this lesson (Interactive, Critical, and/or Response): The interactive, critical, and response perspective will be covered throughout this unit. I will focus on the critical and response perspective during this lesson. Texts: The text that I will use in this lesson is titled I Survived the Sinking of the Titanic, written by Lauren Tarshis (Tarshis, 2010). This book is a narrative text about a boy who survives the sinking of the Titanic. This is an exciting book that includes many opportunities for students to use the critical and response perspective. Other Materials/Technology/Equipment/Resources: Students will be reading the book I Survived the Sinking of the Titanic (Tarshis, 2010). They will also be using 8x10 paper, pencils, crayons, markers, and their reading journals. Grouping structures (one-on-one, small group, whole class): I will introduce the lesson to the whole class and have students complete the pre-assessment. Students will work in small groups based upon ability level for the remainder of the lesson. I will work with my focus students in a guided reading group. Page 2
  13. 13. LITERACY LESSON: CRITICAL AND RESPONSE PERSPECTIVES Lesson Sequence Learning Activities Introduction/Anticipatory Set I will begin the lesson by giving a short pre-assessment. I will pass out the books to each student and explain the preview and predict activity. Students will complete this in their reading journals. I will take notes and collect data after students finish this assessment. I will then read the back of the book out loud and ask students to share what they wrote for the preview and predict activity. I will also ask students to share their schema about the Titanic. I will go on to explain what they will be doing throughout the lesson and go over the learning targets. I will teach a mini-lesson on what it means to think critically about characters and events in the story. I will also talk about how to respond to text in a meaningful way. Lastly, I will allow students to share prior knowledge about these tasks. Building/Applying Knowledge and Skills     To begin the lesson, I will read the first three pages of chapter one to my students. I will encourage students to ask themselves questions about the characters, setting, and events. I will also remind students to be metacognitive and choose the best and most efficient strategy to read the text. I will go on to explain critical thinking in depth and discuss the first task that students will do, which will be to read chapters one and two with their groups. After they read, each student will complete a character poster on an 8x10 piece of paper. This idea is based upon the “Open-Mind Portraits” idea, as discussed by Dr. Gail Tompkins (Tompkins, 2010). They will choose a character in chapters one or two and will draw a picture of what they think the character looks like. They should also include three facts and details about the character, as well as three to four details about the characters point of view. I will encourage students to pretend like they were the character in the book and “think” like the character. Directions will be posted on the Smart Board for students to refer to. After students complete this activity, I will briefly bring the groups back together to explain the summative assessment. Each student will be responsible for writing an opinion paragraph about what they think will happen to the main character, George, based on what they read in chapters one and two. I will remind the students that they will need to support their opinion with details and evidence from the story. I have previously taught this type of writing, so students have had experience and practice with this. I will work with the focus students that I have previously chosen in a small guided reading group. I will allow students to read aloud and I will ask questions as they read the first two chapters. They students will complete the same formative and summative assessment as they rest of the class, but will receive extra help and guidance throughout. Assessment Opportunities The preview and predict pre-assessment will serve as a formative assessment for this lesson. I will collect data from this assessment, which will help to guide my instruction. The character poster will serve as a summative assessment. This assessment allows students to think critically when they choose their character and discuss details about them and their point of view. It also allows students to transform themselves into this character and feel what it may have been like for a real survivor on the Titanic. The opinion paragraph will serve as the summative assessment. This assessment allows students to respond to text in their own way. Everyone is entitled to an opinion, so students will not feel pressured to think one way or another. Page 3
  14. 14. LITERACY LESSON: CRITICAL AND RESPONSE PERSPECTIVES Synthesis/Closure I will close the lesson by bringing the group back together and discussing chapters one and two of the book. I will then allow students to share their character poster with the class. I will ask the students to share how they were able to think critically about the character and the character’s point of view. I will then come back to discuss critical thinking and ask students to answer the question “how will George survive the sinking of the Titanic?” I will answer questions that students might have and then share that they will be reading the rest of the book in a similar fashion, but will be completing different activities throughout. I will assess student’s knowledge of critical thinking as they discuss their character posters and answer the question “how will George survive the sinking of the Titanic?” I will collect each poster and compile student data. I will also collect student’s reading journals and grade their summative assessment. I will use all data to guide my instruction and determine the students who need pushed to a higher level and the students who need intervention. Extension/Enrichment/Transfer of Generalization of Knowledge: As an extension to the lesson, I will allow students to create a front page of a newspaper, which would cover the sinking of the Titanic. I will bring in several school appropriate front pages of newspapers that I have kept for students to refer to. I will discuss text features, such as headings, pictures, charts, graphs, etc… I will then allow students to work individually to create a front page of a newspaper that covers the sinking of the Titanic. The students would need to write one to two articles and include a picture or other text features. The students in my class have some background knowledge about the Titanic from previously read texts. I will allow students to go back to these texts for details and information. I will also allow students to complete research about the sinking of the Titanic on the computer. I would make sure to talk about textual validity, especially with information found online. I will give students a list of credible websites to use while completing their research. This activity would allow students to think critically and respond to text that they have read. Page 4
  15. 15. LITERACY LESSON: CRITICAL AND RESPONSE PERSPECTIVES References Common Core Standards Initiative. (2010). English Language Arts Standards: Reading: Informational Text: Grade 4. Retrieved from http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/4 Tarshis, L. (2010). I survived the sinking of the titanic, 1912. New York, NY: Scholastic Inc. Tompkins, G.E. (2010). Literacy for the 21st century: A balanced approach (5th ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon. Page 5
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