Navigating the  Social Media Minefield Military communication in the digital age Presented by Amy Mengel NY National Guard...
Hi. Amy Mengel amymengel.com @amymengel Founder,  Social Media Breakfast  Tech Valley @smbtv smbtv.eventbrite.com
The old way of communication: broadcasting
People are consuming information differently Teens watch 60% less TV than their parents and spend 600% more time online  (...
Social Technographics
 
Expectations for communication  are different now
Conversations are happening, whether you participate or not
Tell your story, then let people interact with and share it
It’s no longer about controlling information.  Create, nurture, respond
P O S T People Assess your stakeholders’ social activities Objectives Decide what you want to accomplish Strategy Plan for...
But can you do this in the military?
Communication Community Building Crisis Response Opportunities for social media in the military
Transmedia Storytelling  Blogs Videos Podcasts Photos Tweets Comments Forums Aggregation Statusphere
“Brand Journalism”
Social outposts: Deploy your content
Open, transparent communication
Communication Community Building Crisis Response Opportunities for social media in the military
Nurture a community that participates
Facilitating knowledge exchange
Providing platforms for info and sharing US Army iPhone app
Community Building
Community Building
Harness existing content and community
Take advantage of what’s out there
Communication Community Building Crisis Response Opportunities for social media in the military
People are media outlets themselves
Fort Hood Shootings
Scott & White Healthcare – Fort Hood
Key Considerations <ul><li>Monitor, monitor, monitor </li></ul><ul><li>Accuracy and speed are  BOTH  important </li></ul><...
Activate your community in a crisis
Haiti Relief
Have a plan for engaging with negative content
Crisis Response  Nay United Breaks Guitars Dominoes Pizza Motrin Moms Yea H&M Clothing Stores Southwest Airlines Royal Car...
<ul><li>Sharing and collaboration > broadcasting </li></ul><ul><li>Create and seed content across the Web </li></ul><ul><l...
Questions?
Photo credits <ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/manning999/2119255875/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/l...
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Navigating the Social Media Minefield

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Presented at the 2010 NY National Guard Public Affairs Conference, Saratoga Springs, NY. A look at how social media is changing communication practices and how the military can use social media for communication, community building, and crisis response.

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  • Typically communications was top-down. An organization had something to say, conceived of a message, and sent it out to audiences. Not much two-way interaction, difficult to gauge response and feedback. Easy to control the message.
  • Broadcast is one of many ways that messages are circulating, and it’s influence is decreasing. People share information with friends and rely on their networks to give them important information.
  • We are used to sorting people by demographics, but what about technographics? Where would you put yourself now? Two years ago? Five years ago?
  • Huge decrease in “inactives’. ¾ of population are spectators – even if not writing or commenting on blogs, they are reading them. This data is a year old – probably changed even more now. Even fewer inactives.
  • People want information immediately. They want to be able to share and comment on it. They want it to be transparent, genuine, and authentic and they will call it out if it’s not.
  • If you choose not to participate in social media, it won’t go away. Better to be listening and monitoring so that you can engage, react and respond as necessary.
  • Communication is two way now and it has legs. People can comment on posts and news stories. They can create reaction videos and blog posts. They can post news across social networking sites with one click. But you need to give them something worth sharing
  • Control is not the key. The information you create needs to be seeded and nurtured across your community. Embrace the content and information that they create. Ford Mustang enthusiasts calendar example.
  • P is People. Don&apos;t start a social strategy until you know the capabilities of your audience. If you&apos;re targeting college students, use social networks. If you&apos;re reaching out business travelers, consider ratings and reviews. Forrester has great  data to help with this, but you can make some estimates on your own. Just don&apos;t start without thinking about it. O is objectives. Pick one. Are you starting an application to listen to your customers, or to talk with them? To support them, or to energize your best customers to evangelize others? Or are you trying to collaborate with them? Decide on your objective before you decide on a technology. Then figure out how you will measure it. S is Strategy. Strategy here means figuring out what will be different after you&apos;re done. Do you want a closer, two-way relationship with your best customers? Do you want to get people talking about your products? Do you want a permanent focus group for testing product ideas and generating new ones? Imagine you succeed. How will things be different afterwards? Imagine the endpoint and you&apos;ll know where to begin. T is Technology. A community. A wiki. A blog or a hundred blogs. Once you know your people, objectives, and strategy, then you can decide with confidence.
  • The Air Force and Army, two branches who are leading the way so far in social media adoption in the military, are actually pretty open about communicating via these new channels. In reality, the processes and regulations for communicating via social media should be different than those of traditional channels
  • Communication – internal comms, public affairs, community communication Community building – recruiting, personnel/human resources, family communication, veterans Crisis response – correcting information, directing/channeling responses, monitoring, activating community, clarification
  • The same story can be told in many different ways with many different media components You don’t need to use all of these every time, but always be thinking how you can use many
  • Create and publish your own content. Become your own reporter for your organization. Publish across platforms.
  • YouTube channel but also pentagonchannel Web site – cross posting. Go where people are.
  • Depending on how they’re written, blogs can be more personal and add a more humanized element to communications. They’re generally more conversational in tone. Important – the ability to easily share each piece of content. One-click for people to tweet a blog post or put it on their facebook wall. Should allow them to comment, like, etc. each piece of content. Build interaction.
  • Communication – internal comms, public affairs, community communication Community building – recruiting, personnel/human resources, family communication, veterans Crisis response – correcting information, directing/channeling responses, monitoring, activating community, clarification
  • Building a community – you’re also building goodwill and your reputation
  • Over 100,000 posts from prospective soldiers. Recruits share information and concerns with each other, NG recruiters answer questions. Can take some of the burden off the organization – let recruits help each other.
  • US Army iPhone app – just released this week. Lets users access Army-produced media (flickr photostream, blog posts, video, etc.) from their phone. Soldiers and families can use the app to record/save individual stories,images and videos and share them. Also includes a lot of info on ranks, weapons, units. It’s interactive, fun, informative
  • 12,000 fans. Discussions, photos, video,
  • User generated content – photos they share on the site.
  • Don’t neglect what’s already out there
  • Curate and share content that’s already out there, that people are creating for you. Why didn’t 3M take advantage of this? They could have done so much with it – forgiven the kid’s loans, offered him a job, made a commercial out of his piece, etc.
  • Communication – internal comms, public affairs, community communication Community building – recruiting, personnel/human resources, family communication, veterans Crisis response – correcting information, directing/channeling responses, monitoring, activating community, clarification
  • “The first report is almost always wrong” Fort Hood shootings accounted for 20% of news links on Twitter during the week of/following the shootings Eyewitness accounts posted by people who were at or near the base Twitter users in the area were refuting media reports – no chaos, things were calm, etc. News outlets set up twitter lists that aggregated people tweeting about the event A lot of misinformation was spread A press conference is no longer to release information, it’s to clarify information
  • Scott and White Hospital used Twitter and social media: Link to official hospital statement, tweeted phone number for the media, alerted ppl that hospital was closed except for Fort Hood patients. Used hashtags. Using Twitter as realtime communication.
  • During a crisis should have people assigned to do nothing but monitor social media – Twitter, blogs, news. Where’s the misinformation. What needs to be corrected or escalated (Southwest Air) Accuracy is always important, but if you wait and wait until you have every single fact, the story will already be out of control Even if you’re not ready to make a statement, use social media as a holding statement and a way to kill certain rumors or misinfo By the time you hold your news conference, your audience will already know the basics of the story
  • Donations via text messaging Bloggers linking to ways to donate, ChipIn widgets on blogs American Red Cross Flickr gallery of Haiti relief Designed to get people to take action, activate them
  • Transcript of "Navigating the Social Media Minefield"

    1. 1. Navigating the Social Media Minefield Military communication in the digital age Presented by Amy Mengel NY National Guard Public Affairs Conference January 23, 2010
    2. 2. Hi. Amy Mengel amymengel.com @amymengel Founder, Social Media Breakfast Tech Valley @smbtv smbtv.eventbrite.com
    3. 3. The old way of communication: broadcasting
    4. 4. People are consuming information differently Teens watch 60% less TV than their parents and spend 600% more time online (Arthur W. Page) 22.4 million people access news daily from a mobile device (Cellular News) YouTube is third largest search engine Facebook has 350 million users 3.5 billion pieces of content shared each week on Facebook alone 3.1 million Wikipedia entries Not just consuming. Creating & interacting
    5. 5. Social Technographics
    6. 7. Expectations for communication are different now
    7. 8. Conversations are happening, whether you participate or not
    8. 9. Tell your story, then let people interact with and share it
    9. 10. It’s no longer about controlling information. Create, nurture, respond
    10. 11. P O S T People Assess your stakeholders’ social activities Objectives Decide what you want to accomplish Strategy Plan for how relationships will change Technology Decide which social technologies to use Copyright Forrester Research Forrester’s POST Approach
    11. 12. But can you do this in the military?
    12. 13. Communication Community Building Crisis Response Opportunities for social media in the military
    13. 14. Transmedia Storytelling Blogs Videos Podcasts Photos Tweets Comments Forums Aggregation Statusphere
    14. 15. “Brand Journalism”
    15. 16. Social outposts: Deploy your content
    16. 17. Open, transparent communication
    17. 18. Communication Community Building Crisis Response Opportunities for social media in the military
    18. 19. Nurture a community that participates
    19. 20. Facilitating knowledge exchange
    20. 21. Providing platforms for info and sharing US Army iPhone app
    21. 22. Community Building
    22. 23. Community Building
    23. 24. Harness existing content and community
    24. 25. Take advantage of what’s out there
    25. 26. Communication Community Building Crisis Response Opportunities for social media in the military
    26. 27. People are media outlets themselves
    27. 28. Fort Hood Shootings
    28. 29. Scott & White Healthcare – Fort Hood
    29. 30. Key Considerations <ul><li>Monitor, monitor, monitor </li></ul><ul><li>Accuracy and speed are BOTH important </li></ul><ul><li>Release information as you confirm it </li></ul><ul><li>Use social media to correct misinformation </li></ul><ul><li>News conferences are now for clarifying information versus releasing it </li></ul><ul><li>Okay to say that you don’t have answers yet </li></ul>
    30. 31. Activate your community in a crisis
    31. 32. Haiti Relief
    32. 33. Have a plan for engaging with negative content
    33. 34. Crisis Response Nay United Breaks Guitars Dominoes Pizza Motrin Moms Yea H&M Clothing Stores Southwest Airlines Royal Caribbean
    34. 35. <ul><li>Sharing and collaboration > broadcasting </li></ul><ul><li>Create and seed content across the Web </li></ul><ul><li>Tell your story via multiple channels </li></ul><ul><li>Leverage what’s already out there </li></ul><ul><li>Build a community and engage with it </li></ul><ul><li>Monitor always </li></ul><ul><li>Establish guidelines for response </li></ul>Wrapping Up
    35. 36. Questions?
    36. 37. Photo credits <ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/manning999/2119255875/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/larimdame/3003644955/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/soldiersmediacenter/4271795260/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/pinksherbet/3370498053/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/32552054@N04/3047760088/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/chrisstreeter/3674586966/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/dvids/3772132023/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/therefore/18542525/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/yourdon/3088582622/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/hibbert/312177649/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/thomashawk/212469655/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/spodzone/3485953704/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/americanredcross/4291785832/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/smil/3637651409/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www. flickr .com/photos/ worldbank /3492673802/ </li></ul>
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