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Gamification Workshop 2010

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Think Like a Game Designer

Think Like a Game Designer

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  • Using game mechanics to drive desired behavior IS NOT THE SAME as taking someone on a journey towards mastery – once you understand the journey your player is on, you can support that with game design – which INCLUDES but is not focused around game mechanics
  • Using game mechanics to drive desired behavior IS NOT THE SAME as taking someone on a journey towards mastery – once you understand the journey your player is on, you can support that with game design – which INCLUDES but is not focused around game mechanics
  • Using game mechanics to drive desired behavior IS NOT THE SAME as taking someone on a journey towards mastery – once you understand the journey your player is on, you can support that with game design – which INCLUDES but is not focused around game mechanics
  • A less obvious - but even more interesting - social rating system is Flickr’s measure of “interestingness” -- this is a cumulative measure of people’s viewing and tagging and commenting behavior within the site. This is an “emergent” form of social points - and it allows Flickr to identity and reward photographers who create art that Flickr users collectively find interesting. What’s exciting about this rating system is that it INFERS points, based on existing behavior. So ask yourself - is there something similar in the applications that I’m currently working on?
  • A less obvious - but even more interesting - social rating system is Flickr’s measure of “interestingness” -- this is a cumulative measure of people’s viewing and tagging and commenting behavior within the site. This is an “emergent” form of social points - and it allows Flickr to identity and reward photographers who create art that Flickr users collectively find interesting. What’s exciting about this rating system is that it INFERS points, based on existing behavior. So ask yourself - is there something similar in the applications that I’m currently working on?
  • Leaderboards can be a double-edged sword. Wherever you see LeaderBoards for user ratings, You’ll inevitably see people begging others to “vote for me” - but you’ll also see people who are motivated to put their best foot forward - to upload their best videos, and their most “attractive” photos.
  • Back when I studied Psychology, the most memorable and useful thing I learned was the “one-armed bandit” schedule of reinforcement. Which you can see here, in red. The essence is this: if you give random, sizeable rewards for user actions (e.g. how a slot machine works), you will get an addictive behavior pattern - in mice, in pigeons, or in humans.
  • Back when I studied Psychology, the most memorable and useful thing I learned was the “one-armed bandit” schedule of reinforcement. Which you can see here, in red. The essence is this: if you give random, sizeable rewards for user actions (e.g. how a slot machine works), you will get an addictive behavior pattern - in mice, in pigeons, or in humans.
  • Back when I studied Psychology, the most memorable and useful thing I learned was the “one-armed bandit” schedule of reinforcement. Which you can see here, in red. The essence is this: if you give random, sizeable rewards for user actions (e.g. how a slot machine works), you will get an addictive behavior pattern - in mice, in pigeons, or in humans.
  • Back when I studied Psychology, the most memorable and useful thing I learned was the “one-armed bandit” schedule of reinforcement. Which you can see here, in red. The essence is this: if you give random, sizeable rewards for user actions (e.g. how a slot machine works), you will get an addictive behavior pattern - in mice, in pigeons, or in humans.
  • Back when I studied Psychology, the most memorable and useful thing I learned was the “one-armed bandit” schedule of reinforcement. Which you can see here, in red. The essence is this: if you give random, sizeable rewards for user actions (e.g. how a slot machine works), you will get an addictive behavior pattern - in mice, in pigeons, or in humans.
  • Back when I studied Psychology, the most memorable and useful thing I learned was the “one-armed bandit” schedule of reinforcement. Which you can see here, in red. The essence is this: if you give random, sizeable rewards for user actions (e.g. how a slot machine works), you will get an addictive behavior pattern - in mice, in pigeons, or in humans.

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