Thesis.ballew

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Thesis.ballew

  1. 1. MS. AMY BALLEW AN EDUCATION SPECIALIST PROJECT PRESENTED TO THE COLLEGE OF GRADUATE STUDIES OF GEORGIA SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE EDUCATION SPECIALIST IN TEACHING AND LEARNING The Effects of Multiple Intelligence Based Strategies on Student Learning In Fifth Grade Math Students
  2. 2. Statement of Problem <ul><li>Increased accountability for achievement </li></ul><ul><li>Today’s learners and individual needs are diverse </li></ul><ul><li>Traditional instruction primarily verbal/ linguistic and mathematic/logic oriented </li></ul><ul><li>Children who show aptitude in other areas struggle in traditionally structured classes </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of empirical data to support multiple intelligences based instruction </li></ul>
  3. 3. Research Question <ul><li>What are the effects of multiple intelligences strategies on students learning in fifth grade math students? </li></ul>
  4. 4. Literature Review <ul><li>Jie-Qi Chen (2004) supports multiple intelligences as a valid scientific theory </li></ul><ul><li>Studies by Tracey & Richey (2007) and Ozdemir, Guneysu, & Takkaya (2006) investigated content area implementation of the MI theory </li></ul><ul><li>Brand (2006), Douglas, Burton, & Reese-Durham (2008), and Hickey (2004) studied the theory in relation to achievement and student learning </li></ul><ul><li>Latham (1997) and Ediger (2000) noted that the use of non-traditional measures provide a more holistic view of learner aptitude </li></ul>
  5. 5. Method <ul><li>Two predetermined groups of 24 students each </li></ul><ul><li>A pretest was administered to both groups </li></ul><ul><li>A multiple intelligences survey was given to the intervention group </li></ul><ul><li>Control group received traditional standards based instruction </li></ul><ul><li>Intervention group received multiple intelligences based instruction </li></ul><ul><li>A post test was administered to both groups </li></ul>
  6. 6. Results <ul><li>Independent t-test was used initially on pretest scores from both groups </li></ul><ul><li>Control group mean of 37.63 and experimental group mean of 40.33 (no significant difference) </li></ul><ul><li>Independent t-test was used on post test scores from both groups </li></ul><ul><li>Control group mean of 70.5 and experimental group mean of 82.5 </li></ul><ul><li>A statistical difference was noted on the post test scores </li></ul><ul><li>Larger increase in learners from the intervention group on post test scores </li></ul>
  7. 7. Discussion <ul><li>Results support large scale findings </li></ul><ul><li>Decreased engagement in control group may be because traditional instruction lacks authenticity </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of professional development may contribute to continuation of traditional teaching practices </li></ul><ul><li>21 st Century learners need more complex thinking and problem solving skills </li></ul><ul><li>MI theory engages learners in contextually rich environments which provide authenticity and relevance </li></ul>
  8. 8. Limitations <ul><li>50 Student sample size is small </li></ul><ul><li>Minimal time frame of study (3 weeks) </li></ul>
  9. 9. Future Implications <ul><li>Generalizations may be validated with longitudinal studies and larger sample size </li></ul><ul><li>Descriptive study related to students preferred learning style before and after MI instruction </li></ul><ul><li>A need is present for further content specific studies to support with empirical data </li></ul>

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