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Christianity power point

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  • Transcript

    • 1. Christianity:The First Thousand Years
    • 2. Bethlehem Birth Place: According to Nativity Church tradition The Christian Bible is made up of two parts; the Old Testament— largely the Hebrew Bible, and the New Testament—an account of Jesus and early history Christianity. No one knows what date Jesus was actually born, it has been celebrated on December 25 since the 200s. It is commonly stated that Jesus’ birth was 4 B.C. The "B.C." and "A.D." system was not created until many centuries after the birth of Jesus. There was also a 4 year miscalculation when the Roman calendar was converted intothe A.D. calendar by Roman Abbott Dionysus Exiguus. That is the reason the birth is not year0 or year 1. Jesus has to have been born by “4 B.C.” because the Gospel of Matthew places it within the lifetime of Herod the Great, whom we know from sources died in 4 B.C.
    • 3. Galilee, Nazareth in NorthernJesus was Jewish, and some of Israel his teachings reflect Jewish beliefs. The New Covenant = Redemption and Saving; it established that the death ofJesus marked the salvation of Galilee; Nazareth Galilee; Nazareth Galilee; Nazareth all men who faith in God. God in the form of a man, Jesus, began the NewCovenant (Book of Jeremiah, Matthew, I Corinthians, and Hebrews).
    • 4. Gospel: a written account that describes the life, death, and Resurrection of Jesus. In a more general sense the term "gospel" may refer to the messageof the New Testament (an anthology of twenty-seven books written at different times by various authors). The saving actsof God, centered upon Jesus. Christianity emphasizesthe Good News of salvation in Jesus--the Messiah for the faithful, an echo of a prophecy from the Old Testament (Torah).
    • 5. Christian: A person who adheres to Christianity, an Abrahamic (Abraham: descendant of Noahs son Shem), monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth (town where Jesus lived). "Christian" derives from the Greek word Christ, a translation of the Hebrew term Messiah. The Greek wordΧριστιανός (christianos)—meaning "follower of Christ"--—comesfrom Χριστός (christos)—meaning "anointed one" (to be sanctified,set apart for a task or a position by God.). Early Christians were the first Jews that believed Jesus was the Son of God, believe Jesus rose from the dead and told disciples to spread the gospel, believe that people are saved by faithing in God.
    • 6. Jesus’ The Sermon on the Mount is for the most part Law and sets a standard for all Christians. “Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. Blessed are theywho mourn, for they shall be comforted. Blessed are the meek, for they shall possess the earth. Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for justice, for they shall be satisfied.Blessed are the merciful, for they shall obtain mercy. Blessed are the pure of heart, forthey shall see God. Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called sons of God. Blessed are they who suffer persecution for justice sake, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven”, (Matthew 5-7)
    • 7. Jesus’ “The Parable of the Good Samaritan” (Parable: a story or extended metaphor that teaches, or illustrates a lesson) The priest and the Levite were trapped by their rule-book to pass the “unclean” man. Jesus raises the possibility that although they would be legally unclean, there are things that come before man made rules. At the center of that story is compassion expressed incompassionate actions. Jesus paraded both the priest and a Levite as models of indifference, lacking any evidence of mercy, being totally loveless. It is in the actions of the Samaritan that we see a true neighbor giving the gifts of mercy, healing, and life.
    • 8. Jesus sometimes used metaphors,comparisons, to teach.Matthew 7:13-14 13 `Go ye in through the strait gate, because wide[is] the gate, and broad the way that is leading tothe destruction, and many are those going inthrough it; 14 how strait [is] the gate, and compressed theway that is leading to the life, and few are thosefinding it!
    • 9. Political RebelHerod the Greats three-tiered palace cascades down the north face of Masada It is generally agreed that Jesus of Nazareth was born in Bethlehem shortly before Herod the Great’s death, probably around 5 B.C. Jesus lived most of his life under the rule of Herod Antipas (Roman appointed king). During Jesus’ life, the tension between the Jews and Roman rulers remained high. Jews believed they were God’s chosen people, and were not meant to be captives or subjects of another authority, and resented Roman rule. For example, because Herod Antipas viewed John the Baptist as a threat to the existing order, he executed him. John the Baptist was Jesus’ close friend and mentor. It was John who had baptized Jesus around 27 A.D.
    • 10. Jesus was critical of the Pharisees (the Jewish sect that extended and elaborated Jewish laws), and caused a disturbance in the Temple (“Do not make My Fathers house/temple a house ofmerchandise/shopping!”), and was eventually arrested and broughtbefore the Sanhedrin (supreme court of Israel). There Jesus was charged and convicted of blasphemy/lack of respect forauthorities, and they decided to take him to the Roman governor Pontius Pilate, asking him for Jesus death. Pilate, after some debate, rejected their religious justifications; however, accepted the political ones, and sentenced Jesus to death by crucifixion.
    • 11. Middle Ages: ChristianityPope: from Latin: papa; from Greek: πάππας(pappas), a childs word for father; is the Bishop of RomeCatholics recognize the Pope as a successor ofPeter, one of Twelve Apostles (a messenger for Jesus), chosen by Jesus from his first disciples (Jesus’ students) Pope Leo III, 750-816 A.D.
    • 12. A schism (split) arose with the Popes claim to universal jurisdiction, total authority over the Church (congregation/Christians). Catholics recognize the Pope as a successor to Peter. Protestants(Lutherans, Baptists, Methodists, etc.) contend that the New Testament offers no proof that Jesus established the papacy (pope).
    • 13. Christendom By the later Middle Ages, the gods of the Romans, Greeks, and Celts had long since been forgotten, andChristianity became the universal faith of almost all of the people of Europe.People did not think of Europe as a distinct place until the Middle Ages had passed. Instead they spoke of “Christendom”.

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