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Infrastructure and Unbonded Post Tensioning
 

Infrastructure and Unbonded Post Tensioning

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  • Infrastructure is one area where Unbonded PT has the potential to increase its market share relative to existing industries.
  • 94% of US road are paved in asphalt.
  • Concrete makes up the remaining 6% of US roads and is most commonly used in bridges.
  • One potential market where Unbonded Post-Tensioning can increase its market share is airport runways. Traditionally, these are RC pavement. The concrete thickness varies between 12" at non-hub airports to 18" at larger airports.Rockford, IL has a non-hub airport runway that has a 7" Post-Tensioned slab. The cost analysis in 2003 by Ed Rice showed that the PT runway cost $46/sqyd vs. $50/sq.yd for conventional RC. Another benefit was that PT helped eliminate control joints.
  • Another potential market for Unbonded Post-Tensioning would be parking lots, especially those on expansive soils. According to the US Census Bureau, there were 105 million commercial parking spaces in the US. - majority of which are in parking lots.
  • The US Highway Network has 4 million miles of roads - of which 47,000 miles are for heavy highway trafficaccording to the FHA.
  • Emergency Vehicle Operator Course (aka EVOC) was a built recently in Camp Ripley Minnesota and won the 2013 PTI Award of Excellence in the SOG category.
  • Encapsulated PT was used due to the corrosive environment.
  • EVOC is a 4-mile course used by police, fire and military vehicles for training purposes. The Post-Tensioned portion is a skid pan which is made slippery with water, oils and other chemicals so that drivers can practice controlled skids in their vehicles.
  • 2 PT tendons were placed 16" o.c. in the long direction and 19" o.c. in the short direction. A perimeter expansion joint was used to separate the PT slab from the asphalt pavement.
  • 6000 psi shrinkage compensating concrete was laid on top of 2 layers of polyethylene sheet and a 14" base course. Initial stressing of the PT occurred at 16.5 kips when the 1st pour reached 3000 psi and final stressing occurred at 33 kips when the 2nd pour reached 3000 psi.
  • Buford Ave. Pavement Reconstruction project involved replacing an existing RC pavement in St. Paul, MN with a Post-Tensioned Pavement.
  • The construction was completed in 2 months and was designed for a 40 year life span.
  • Buford is located at a major bus stop and was designed to handle heavy traffic from buses.
  • The Univ. of MN Underground Student Lounge was operational during reconstruction. The Post-Tensioned pavement solved one major problem for the students in the U/G Lounge. It was chosen to reduce major deflections and vibrations from the bus traffic from above compared to the RC pavement.

Infrastructure and Unbonded Post Tensioning Infrastructure and Unbonded Post Tensioning Presentation Transcript

  • INFRASTRUCTURE&UNBONDED POST-TENSIONING(CASE STUDIES)Neel KhosaAMSYSCO, Inc.2013 PTI Convention
  • OUTLINE2Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.Concrete Pavements vs.Asphalt PavementsApplications for UnbondedPost-Tensioned ConcreteCase Studies with UnbondedPost-Tensioned Concrete
  • ASPHALTCopyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.
  • 4Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.Cheaper Initial Construction CostFaster Construction Schedule“Softer” for Pedestrian TrafficBetter Traction for Vehicles
  • CONCRETECopyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.
  • 6Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.Durability / Less MaintenanceLower Life-Cycle Costs in HighTraffic RoadsLight Color (Heat Island)Not Oil-Dependent (Environment)
  • CONCRETE VS. ASPHALT ROAD7Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.CONCRETE ACTS MORE LIKE ABRIDGE OVER THE SUBGRADE.LESS PRESSURE IS PLACED ON MATERIALSBELOW CONCRETE PAVEMENTS THAN ONASPHALT PAVEMENTS.
  • 8Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.“Concrete pavementson average outlastasphalt pavements by10-15 years beforeneeding rehabilitation.”American Concrete Pavement Association
  • NOISE VS. FUEL ECONOMY9Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.020406080100120Decibel Max Decibel Min Inst. FuelEconomy (mpg)AsphaltConcreteSource: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ryGugNQbOL0
  • APPLICATIONS FOR UNBONDEDPOST-TENSIONED CONCRETECopyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.
  • Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.
  • Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.
  • Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.
  • 14Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.CASE STUDIES WITH UNBONDEDPOST-TENSIONED CONCRETEWayzata BayRoadsBuford AvenueReconstructionEmergency VehicleOperator CourseUniv. of MN STSSPedestrian Bridge
  • 15Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.Wayzata Bay Roads
  • 16Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.Excessive Settlement due to soilPT Slab supported by 120’ pilesDesigned for HS20-44 LoadingEncapsulated Post-TensioningWayzata BayRoads
  • 17Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.Wayzata BayRoads
  • 18Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.Wayzata BayRoads
  • 19Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.Wayzata BayRoads
  • 20Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.Wayzata BayRoads
  • 21Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.Wayzata BayRoads“Post-Tensioning was aneffective way to reduce theconcrete volume of the slabto 13 inches – whichminimized the load to thesupporting pipe piles.”Ryan Bonniwell(Ericksen Roed & Associates)
  • 22Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.Emergency Vehicle Operator Course (EVOC)
  • 23Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.60,000 square foot area2 pours on consecutive days0.5” Encapsulated Post-TensionMade slippery for driver testingEVOC
  • 24Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.EVOC
  • 25Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.EVOC
  • 26Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.EVOC
  • 27Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.EVOC
  • Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.Buford Ave. Reconstruction
  • Buford Ave. 29Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.PT Section = 102 Feet x 32 Feet7” Concrete Thickness40 Years of Expected Life0.6” PT replaced RC Pavement
  • Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.Buford Ave.
  • Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.Buford Ave.
  • 32Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.Buford Ave.
  • Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.Buford Ave.
  • 34Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.Buford Ave.
  • Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.Univ. of MN STSSPlaza and Pedestrian Bridge
  • STSS PedestrianBridge 36Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.STSS Building is post-tensionedBridge = 220’ long x 20’ wide6” slab with 1 longitudinal beamTraffic = 25,000 students/day
  • Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.STSS Plaza/Ped
  • Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.STSS Plaza
  • Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.STSS Plaza
  • Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.STSS PedestrianBridge
  • Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.STSS PedestrianBridge
  • Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.
  • Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.Unbonded Encapsulated Post-Tensioningis an effective alternative to RC orAsphalt for infrastructure projects.RECAP
  • SOURCESPHOTOGRAPHSAsphalt Road : http://www.llpelling.comConcrete Road : http://www.urbanophile.comConcrete vs. Asphalt : http://www.pavement.comAirport Runways : http://paulswork.wordpress.comParking Lots : http://fatjacl.comPedestrian Bridges : http://mid-citysteel.comWayzata Bay Roads : Adolfson & Peterson ConstructionEVOC : Brainerd Dispatch and Pawan GuptaSTSS Plaza : McGough ConstructionQuestion Mark : http://m.inmagine.comSTRUCTURAL DRAWINGSWayzata Bay Roads : Ericksen RoedEVOC : URSBuford Ave. : SEH44Copyright © 2013 AMSYSCO Inc.RELEVANT DATA http://www.concreteisbetter.com/elib-factsheets.html http://www.concreteisbetter.com/elib-casestudies.html http://www.concreteisbetter.com/elib-research.html http://www.concreteisbetter.com/vs.html http://www.ltrc.lsu.edu/ltc_11/pdf/The%20Use%20of%20Life%20Cycle%20Assessment%20(LCA)%20to%20Evaluate%20Pavement%20Choice.pdf http://www.ctscement.com/Specs2005/PDFdocs/TypeK_News2003.pdf http://www.bolingconcrete.com/benefits-of-concrete.html http://www.thomasconcrete.com/UserDyn/ThomasConcrete/pdf/concrete-processes.pdf http://www.pavement.com/concrete_pavement/technical/fundamentals/Differences_Between_Concrete_and_Asphalt.asp http://www.cement.org/PCA%20White%20Paper%203.pdf http://www.artba.org/about/faqs-transportation-general-public/faqs/ http://www.dcnonl.com/article/id48193 http://www.pwmag.com/concrete/asphalt-vs--concrete--the-fight-to-pave-our-roads.aspx http://www.pwmag.com/concrete/asphalt-vs--concrete--the-fight-to-pave-our-roads_2.aspx