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Coaching skills   feedback techniques
 

Coaching skills feedback techniques

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Gaining accountability is through effective coaching. Giving effective feedback is critical to the process. This presentation provides techniques and do's and don'ts of giving feedback.

Gaining accountability is through effective coaching. Giving effective feedback is critical to the process. This presentation provides techniques and do's and don'ts of giving feedback.

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  • Really good explanations about feedback in the context of coaching. In particular I liked the way you described the Do's and Don't's.
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  • Good work, excelent, it help me a lot.
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  • Good summary. I like the level of depth you went into; it wasn't too high level to leave me wondering what to do, and had plenty of examples.
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  • Have seen 3 changes of government in my career and have guided companies through those impacts from a practical point of view. Studies in HR kept expanding and did an additional 1.5 years because IR was changing and the concept of HR value was starting to change from a ‘personnel’ perspective to an more strategic approach. Although I have not carved out a specialisation in IR (I am a true generalist) I quite enjoyed the ‘dry’ subjects of IR in gaining my qualifications because my Uni lecturer was absolutely passionate about IR and was extremely knowledgeable. So I am looking forward to this morning and learning and sharing with you this topic.
  • Have seen 3 changes of government in my career and have guided companies through those impacts from a practical point of view. Studies in HR kept expanding and did an additional 1.5 years because IR was changing and the concept of HR value was starting to change from a ‘personnel’ perspective to an more strategic approach. Although I have not carved out a specialisation in IR (I am a true generalist) I quite enjoyed the ‘dry’ subjects of IR in gaining my qualifications because my Uni lecturer was absolutely passionate about IR and was extremely knowledgeable. So I am looking forward to this morning and learning and sharing with you this topic.
  • Have seen 3 changes of government in my career and have guided companies through those impacts from a practical point of view. Studies in HR kept expanding and did an additional 1.5 years because IR was changing and the concept of HR value was starting to change from a ‘personnel’ perspective to an more strategic approach. Although I have not carved out a specialisation in IR (I am a true generalist) I quite enjoyed the ‘dry’ subjects of IR in gaining my qualifications because my Uni lecturer was absolutely passionate about IR and was extremely knowledgeable. So I am looking forward to this morning and learning and sharing with you this topic.
  • GLOBALISATION – THE TRAINING WHEELS ARE COMING OFF. Over the last 10 years we have been getting used to how globalisation can impact our business community. We are now realising how we can really leverage every area of life through globalisation. From ability to communicate and work across time zones, service customer s 24x7, Catch cry has become ‘Anything, anytime, anywhere’...no wonder Gen Y’s have great expectations...we set them up for it...but more on that later! survey has revealed Australian workers are prepared to go to almost any lengths to get the right job. According to the survey, by global recruitment firm Kelly Services, almost three in four Australian workers say they would be prepared to relocate to a different city to find work — and more than half would be willing to move overseas. The survey also found that many Australian workers are willing to devote long periods travelling to and from work, with 14% prepared to spend at least two hours a day commuting. The global survey sought the views of 115,000 people in 33 countries, including almost 19,000 in Australia, about their patterns of travel to and from work, their capacity to move to find the right job and the main factors preventing them from relocating. High degree of mobility Kelly Services country manager James Bowmer said the survey reveals a high degree of mobility in the workforce, with many people very comfortable with the idea of moving considerable distances for the right job. ‘With a more globalised workforce, there is increasingly a recognition that people may have to relocate to find the right work or to advance their career,’ Bowmer said. ‘There are many skills that are easily transferable across borders including in areas such as banking and finance, IT, science and engineering.’ Key findings Key findings of the survey showed: 71% of people would consider relocating to a different city for work 55% would consider relocating to a different country for work 40% would consider relocating to a country where they didn’t fluently speak the local language 14% of people say they are prepared to spend two hours or more each day commuting to and from work 60% of people say they would like to stay living and working where they currently live until they retire. ‘ For many workers, the chance to move to a different city or country can be a rewarding professional experience as well as a good lifestyle choice,’ Bowmer said. ‘Employees, in general, have become much more mobile and willing to be flexible in both their travel and living arrangements to find the right job.' The survey found those workers most likely to move were aged up to 34 years. Typically, they have fewer family and other commitments that prevent them from relocating. Males were more willing to relocate than females. Family issues When asked to rank the main complicating factors in moving to another country for work, the overwhelming issue was ‘family’ (cited by 61% of respondents), followed by ‘language barriers’ (39%), ‘children’s schooling’ (21%), ‘property ownership’ (16%), ‘tax complications’ (11%), and ‘pension/superannuation rights’ (9%). Bowmer said the finding that many workers are willing to be highly mobile in their search for work is good news for employers. ‘At a time of relative skills shortages, globally, targeting employees from another city or internationally can be one of the most effective ways of filling gaps in the labour market,’ he said. Move away The survey also found that Australians are also likely to be mobile in ways not related to work. It found 40% of people say that, before they retire, they would like to move away from the place where they currently live and work. Females are keener to move than males. ‘This suggests that significant numbers of people will be actively looking to change their jobs, homes and lifestyles, with implications for employment, urban planning and transport infrastructure,’ Bowmer said. Travelling times to and from work are a key consideration for employees and the vast majority (61%) are not willing to spend more than 45 minutes, each way, commuting. However 25% are willing to spend 45–60 minutes and 14% are willing to spend 60 minutes or more each way. Females are much less tolerant of longer travelling times than males. Q: DO YOU THINK WE WOULD HAVE REACHED THE LEVEL OF GLOBALISATION THAT WE HAVE WITHOUT THE INTERNET?
  • DECLINING BIRTH RATE:
  • SPEED – Speed & IP are what sets us apart as a generation from our grandparents and generations before. We have been able to advance and achieve due to our ability to increase speed and our knowledge and to put a price and value on it. My grandmother at my age could not have dreamed that it would be possible to travel across the world within 24 hours by air, with 200 other passengers, watching a colour movie, with Special Effects, with a glass of champagne!!!! – but speed and Intellectual Property enabled this to become a reality today. Great news is that our software development approaches mean that we can get ever more done than ever before, completing projects in a third of the time than previously. What does that do? It actually drives up demand enormously through companies choosing to take on more projects. We live in a society where speed and knowledge are highly valued and has created heightened expectation in performance, productivity & choice. Examples of where Combined they can be advantageous: Medical Science – Save lives Create more money – time is money! Internet a simple example – increase knowledge faster More examples?.... Q: Can anyone give examples where combined they can be powerfully dangerous? drugs & trafficking Let me give you a real scary one.........the speed at which your employees can find a job opening and leave you with your IP – powerfully dangerous!
  • MANAGEMENT PRACTICES – 1) Industrial Revolution – 1960’s Mgt by Instruction 2) 1960- 2000 – Mgt by Objectives 3) 2000 + Mgt through Values
  • As a business community in 1988 these where the values held broadly through a research project by Hewitt and Associates. Who would like to chance a guess why I may have put some in Blue and some in Red and what they may represent??? And what is the single main factor that has caused this shift the business context?? YES! ENTER THE GEN Y’S
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Coaching skills   feedback techniques Coaching skills feedback techniques Presentation Transcript

  • Coaching Skills – Feedback Techniques ANNE-MARIE ORROCK | MAY 2008
  • Objectives
      • Importance of feedback
      • Types of feedback
      • Features of Effective Feedback
      • Feedback Session Model
      • Feedback Techniques
      • Follow up
  • Why give feedback?
      • Helps employees identify areas for improvement.
      • Imparts ways to improve and correct performance.
      • Boost confidence in areas they have correct performance & behaviour.
      • Motivates behaviour change.
        • Intrinsically/ extrinsically?
  • Types of Feedback Reinforcing feedback Corrective feedback
  • Reinforcement Feedback
    • Commends a good job done. Urges recipient to continue with the performance and strengthen it.
    • Be specific on:
    • what is good
    • what you like about it
    • The impact it has on outcomes, you and others.
    • PAR Model
    • Write down and plan the above points prior to meeting.
    • Don’t try and do it ‘off the cuff’
  • Corrective Feedback
    • Points out areas of performance or behaviour needing improving or modifying and suggestions on how to improve.
    • Remember to employ ‘coaching’ (i.e ask vs tell) techniques to help facilitate feedback and how to improve.
    • PAR Model
  • Features of Effective Feedback
    • Understanding & supportive
    • Planned, timely & regular
    • Encourages self-assessment
    • Focuses on modifiable behaviour
    • Constructive and non-judgemental
    • Focuses on desired actions
    • Private
  • Understanding & Supportive
    • The purpose of feedback is to improve performance not to punish.
    • Give the space and opportunity for recipients to express their needs and concerns with ease.
    • Create an environment of trust:
      • ‘ generous’ listening & speaking
      • Not interrupting
      • A calm and even voice
      • Concrete examples (negative and/or positive)
      • No disruptions
  • Timely & Regular
    • Feedback given as close a possible to the time you observe or become aware of the incorrect behaviour or performance that needs improvement
    • Feedback sessions should be scheduled at regular and mutually agreed timeframes and locations to enable feedback to occur.
  • Encourages Self-assessment
    • Asking how employees feel they are going first opens up the opportunity for:
    • Self regulation of performance and behaviour
    • Raises areas that you may not be aware they are not performing
    • Less defensiveness allowing a more trusting and open environment
  • Focuses on modifiable behaviour Focus on behaviour or performance that can be modified Ask employee how they would expect to make the change in the first instance. Refrain from making generalised comments on their personality or traits that are a part of who they are and not necessarily modifiable. Avoid accusatory statements, rather state what you observe.
    • Avoid statements that are judgemental or based on assumption.
    • Allow mistakes to be made. Create an environment where mistakes are crucial for learning and improvement not a punishable offense first time.
    • Choose words that con -struct and don’t
    • de -struct the relationship.
    Constructive & Non-judgemental
    • Don’t give feedback that is not backed or supported with the desired action expected.
    • Similarly with Reinforcement Feedback reiterate the praised behaviour or performance.
    • Give specific examples of where they excelled.
    Focuses on desired actions
  • Focuses on desired behaviours Good job on the report it was well done. Good job on the Westpac case study. It was well done and particularly highlighted the strengths in portfolio investments. Your use of graphics made it very easy to interpret.
  • Focus on desired behaviours You were really intimidating toward the client in that last meeting. Did you sense at all that the client may have been at unease? Some times our industry terminology can be confusing. Maybe you could explain in more detail what specific terms mean...
  • Private
    • Corrective Feedback is best communicated in private initially
    • Reinforcement Feedback can be given privately or publicly – passive reinforcement is good practice and boosts peer esteem.
  • Feedback Session Model 1. Feedback session environment 2. The Feedback 3. Action Plan 4. Feedback Session Summary Ask for self assessment first then give the observed first hand feedback Together develop an action plan to improve and correct performance Develop an environment of trust that is neutral, no distractions with enough time for both parties to express concerns. Summarise feedback, action plan, first steps and follow up date.
  • Feedback Techniques Ask-Tell-Ask Sandwich Bridge
  • Ask-Tell-Ask Technique
    • Ask employee for self assessment
    • Tell them the behaviour/performance you observe and how it differs to what you expect.
    • Ask employee how they think they could improve and what action they can take.
  • Recruitment Methods & Criteria Sandwich Technique
    • Praise for their strengths and areas of good performance.
    • Tell them the behaviour/performance you observe and how it differs to what you expect.
    • Praise their ability to adapt and modify and use examples where they have adapted and modified behaviour in the past successfully.
  • Recruitment Methods & Criteria
    • Connecting concepts together from past to future
        • Focusing on:
        • Past positive behaviour/performance.
        • Present observed behaviour/performance.
        • Future behaviour/performance expected.
    Bridge Technique
  • Follow Up
    • Critical in process to determine if feedback was absorbed and learning occurred.
    • Reflect on feedback and session value
    • Ask employee how session went and what they thought of their performance/behaviour that you described to them.
    • Are they clear of next steps or agreed action?
    • Use the wrap up/way forward stage of the GROW coaching model to gain commitment .
    Wrap Up
  • GROW Model
  • Questions?
  • Thank You!