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Hemp final Hemp final Presentation Transcript

  • 1 HEMP Hazard and Effects Management Program
  • Objective:Objective: After this session you will be able to: • Understand How to Manage Hazards and their Effects • Understand your role and responsibility in the HEMP process • Have clear understanding of how Hazards and Effects Management (HEMP) fits into the HSE Control Framework • Understand the 6 Practical Steps for completing a HEMP review • Have enough knowledge to discuss HEMP and ask the right questions After this session you will be able to: • Understand How to Manage Hazards and their Effects • Understand your role and responsibility in the HEMP process • Have clear understanding of how Hazards and Effects Management (HEMP) fits into the HSE Control Framework • Understand the 6 Practical Steps for completing a HEMP review • Have enough knowledge to discuss HEMP and ask the right questions
  • HEMP Hazard and Effects Management Program 3 • The HEMP is at the heart of our HSE Management Systems. It’s where the planning turns into action. • HSE Risk Management relies primarily on HEMP and it’s associated tools.
  • What is a HEMP? • All our activities have the potential to harm people and the environment or cause damage to assets, financial loss, and to adversely impact on reputation. • To manage these risks, we use a Hazard and Effects Management Process (HEMP) • A HEMP is a structured approach to identifying and managing the hazards and potential effects of these activities. • The overall objective is to reduce risks to As Low As Reasonably Practicable (ALARP). • A HEMP evaluation can be detailed e.g. an HSE Case for a high-risk activity such as Road Transport • ... or a relatively short e.g. For a single task in a mechanical workshop such as changing a tyre. 4
  • HEMP Hazard and Effects Management Program 5 HEMP Application Steps:HEMP Application Steps: Identify (the hazard, and hazardous events)Identify (the hazard, and hazardous events) Assess (the Risks)Assess (the Risks) Control (the threats that might release the hazard that leads to theControl (the threats that might release the hazard that leads to the hazardous event)hazardous event) Recover (from the hazardous event, if possible before incurring anRecover (from the hazardous event, if possible before incurring an unwanted consequence)unwanted consequence)
  • How to Manage Hazards and their Effects The 6 HEMP Steps Implementing a HEMP Identify Hazards Assess Risk Develop Controls Risk ALARP? Plan Recovery N Y Record Process
  • Moving Heavy Equipment Working at Height Flammable Hydrocarbons Raised Objects HAZARD - An agent that has the potential to cause harm to People, damage to Assets, business loss and Impact on the Environment or Reputation Hazards are systematically identified using a standard hazard checklist Rotating MachineryMoving Vehicles Chemicals Step1 Hazard Identification
  • 1. The potential to harm people or the environment, cause damage to or loss of assets, or adversely impact reputation. 2. Consider the hazards arising during the entire lifecycle of an asset or activity; • Planning, mobilisation & set-up • Routine conditions • Abnormal conditions (e.g. weather extremes & use of back-ups) • Reasonably foreseeable incidents and/or emergency situations • Demobilisation • Past activities As a start, consider these hazards: • Flammable and explosive substances • Chemicals and toxic substances • Land Transport • Working at heights above 2m • Confined spaces • Slips, trips and falls • Machinery with moving parts • Extreme temperatures • Electricity • Objects under induced stress • Lifting and moving equipment • Security 8 Step1 Hazard Identification
  • CONSEQUENCES (Effects) - the impacts on People, Assets, Environment and Reputation if a Hazard is Released 2 – ASSESS the Risk2 – ASSESS the Risk Identification Of Consequences And Assessment Of Risks LegalLegal ActioActio nn Fi r e ToxiToxi cc GasGas ClouClou dd Lost Time Injury DeatDeat hh Discharge s and Emissions ExplosionExplosion ComplaCompla intsints Fall in ShareFall in Share PricePrice
  • 2 – ASSESS the Risk Use the Matrix to: • Assess the risks of the identified hazards by assessing the likelihood of the effect occurring and its consequence. • Categorise each risk as Low, Medium, or High. 10
  • 2 – ASSESS the Risk
  • • Risk is the likelihood that a specific consequence will occur within a specified period • Risk is therefore a function of the severity of a consequence and the likelihood of the consequence • In using the PDO RAM, we consider the worst credible consequence to People, Assets, Environment and Reputation • Likelihood is HISTORICAL (has it happened before in The location? The organisation? The industry?) • Risk rating (ranking) is the resulting position on the RAM RISK = Consequences X Likelihood IncreasingIncreasing LikelihoodLikelihood ofof Top EventTop Event Increasing RiskIncreasing Risk Identification Of Consequences And Assessment Of Risks 2 – ASSESS the2 – ASSESS the RiskRisk Increasing Consequence Severity
  • 3- CONTROL the risk • Following assessment of risks, HEMP requires that controls be applied in order to reduce risks to ALARP. • Controls should focus on risk elimination and reduction before recovery measures. • Controls should include preventative and mitigation measures involving active, passive and/or operational systems. • Examples of operational systems to be considered include: • Training programs • Monitoring programs • Procedures & work instructions • Management plans • Emergency response plans • Audit and inspection programs. 13
  • 4 – Is the Risk ‘ALARP’? “As low as reasonably practicable”. Risks are ALARP when the time, effort, difficulty and cost of further risk reduction measures have been assessed as being unreasonable in regard to the additional risk reduction. ALARP has NOT been achieved if, a small increase in cost and effort, could greatly reduce a risk. 14 Acceptable level of risk 61 2 3 4 5 Level of risk remaining after control option is applied Cost & effort of implementing each control option Control Options Risk $$ & Effort
  • 5 – RECOVERING if the controls fail Once the controls required to reduce the risk to ALARP have been identified, an additional examination of the hazard control measures should be made This will to identify how recovery from a hazard can be accomplished if all of the controls fail. Note they will be recorded as another control • Physical equipment (e.g. roll- bars, seat belts, airbags). • Action plans for emergency response (e.g. call-out duty roster). • Curative measures (e.g. medical facilities, first aid training). • Compensative measures (e.g. financial payments). 15
  • 16 Plan RecoveryPlan Recovery Identification of Barriers (the Control and Recovery Measures) • CONTROLS prevent the threat from releasing the hazard to cause the Top Event. • RECOVERY MEASURES mitigate the Top Event or the worst credible consequences. TT HH RR EE AA TT HH AA ZZ AA RR DD TOPTOP EVENTEVENT C O N S E Q U E N C E R E C O V E R Y CC OO NN TT RR OO LL SS
  • 17 LoadLoad PlanPlan Examples of Controls, Recovery MeasuresExamples of Controls, Recovery Measures • CONTROLSCONTROLS prevent the threat from releasing the hazard to cause the Top Event. • RECOVERY MEASURESRECOVERY MEASURES mitigate the Top Event or the worst credible consequences. DesignDesign StandardsStandards EmergencyEmergency ResponseResponse PlansPlans Blast Resistant ModulesAccessAccess ControlControl AntilockAntilock BrakingBraking SystemSystem CommunityCommunity RelationsRelations PlanningPlanning
  • 6 – RECORD6 – RECORD • The final step of HEMP is formally recording the process. • This is typically done by recording the findings in a HEMP Register • Please note this is a live document. • It must be reviewed and changed regularly • It must be used onsite by the people planning the jobs A HEMP register should include: • A description of the hazard. • Probable threats • Possible consequences • Escalation factors increasing the likelihood or severity of an incident. • asks undertaken to provide or maintain controls or recovery measures (HSE-Critical Tasks). • Positions responsible for HSE- Critical Tasks (HSE-Critical Positions). 18
  • 19 Exercise 1. Imagine you are the owner of the Nairobi Zoo, and you have the opportunity to acquire a lion for your zoo. 2. Up until now you have only had sheep and rabbits in your zoo. 3. Identify the Hazard, Top event and Consequence, RAM your Consequence 4. What can go wrong and how can you prevent this from happening? 5. What happens if the Lion Gets out? What do you do?
  • 20 Hazard Threat Barriers Top Event Recovery Measures Consequences Lion Human Error; Improper design etc. Loss of Control; Lion Gets out Zoo Emergency Response Plan Accident, Injuries, Fatalities Lion at the Zoo Materials of Const.; Zoo Keeper Rounds etc.
  • 21 Identify Hazards Assess Risk Develop Controls Risk ALARP? Plan Recovery N Y Record Process
  • 22