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Transcript

  • 1. Agile and ScrumClickindia
  • 2. What is the problem?
  • 3. What is the problem?Releases take too long
  • 4. What is the problem?Releases take too longStabilization takes too long
  • 5. What is the problem?Releases take too longStabilization takes too longChanges are hard to make
  • 6. What is the problem?Releases take too longStabilization takes too longChanges are hard to makeQuality is falling
  • 7. What is the problem?Releases take too longStabilization takes too longChanges are hard to makeQuality is fallingDeath marches are hurting morale
  • 8. Traditional Software Development Time - X weeksRequirements Design Code Test Implement Maintain
  • 9. Traditional Software Development Time - X weeksRequirements Design Code Test Implement Maintain
  • 10. Traditional Software Development Time - X weeksRequirements Design Code Test Implement Maintain
  • 11. Traditional Software Development Time - X weeksRequirements Design Code Test Implement Maintain
  • 12. Traditional Software Development Time - X weeksRequirements Design Code Test Implement Maintain
  • 13. Traditional Software Development Time - X weeksRequirements Design Code Test Implement Maintain
  • 14. Traditional Software Development Time - X weeksRequirements Design Code Test Implement Maintain
  • 15. Traditional Software Development Issues?
  • 16. Issues
  • 17. IssuesRequirements change:
  • 18. IssuesRequirements change:A better idea
  • 19. IssuesRequirements change:A better ideaCompetition has launched a better product
  • 20. IssuesRequirements change:A better ideaCompetition has launched a better productNo clarity of what we want until we see it
  • 21. Traditional Software DevelopmentRequirements Knowns Unknowns Known Unknown
  • 22. Traditional Software DevelopmentRequirements Knowns Unknowns Known Unknown
  • 23. Traditional Software DevelopmentRequirements Knowns Unknowns Warning/ Included in requirements Known Risk management Forgot to mention Problematic Unknown
  • 24. Traditional Software DevelopmentRequirements Knowns Unknowns Warning/ Included in requirements Known Risk management Forgot to mention Problematic Unknown
  • 25. Traditional Software DevelopmentRequirements Knowns Unknowns Warning/ Included in requirements Known Risk management Forgot to mention Problematic Unknown
  • 26. Traditional Software DevelopmentRequirements Knowns Unknowns Warning/ Included in requirements Known Risk management Forgot to mention Problematic Unknown
  • 27. IssuesNon prioritized requirements Feature usage
  • 28. Solution - Agile manifestoFollowing a plan Responding to changeProcess and tools Individuals and interactions Documentation Working software
  • 29. Agile manifesto - 12 principles
  • 30. Agile manifesto - 12 principlesCustomer satisfaction by rapid delivery of useful software
  • 31. Agile manifesto - 12 principlesCustomer satisfaction by rapid delivery of useful softwareWelcome changing requirements, even late in development
  • 32. Agile manifesto - 12 principlesCustomer satisfaction by rapid delivery of useful softwareWelcome changing requirements, even late in developmentWorking software is delivered frequently (weeks rather than months)
  • 33. Agile manifesto - 12 principlesCustomer satisfaction by rapid delivery of useful softwareWelcome changing requirements, even late in developmentWorking software is delivered frequently (weeks rather than months)Working software is the principal measure of progress
  • 34. Agile manifesto - 12 principlesCustomer satisfaction by rapid delivery of useful softwareWelcome changing requirements, even late in developmentWorking software is delivered frequently (weeks rather than months)Working software is the principal measure of progressSustainable development, able to maintain a constant pace
  • 35. Agile manifesto - 12 principlesCustomer satisfaction by rapid delivery of useful softwareWelcome changing requirements, even late in developmentWorking software is delivered frequently (weeks rather than months)Working software is the principal measure of progressSustainable development, able to maintain a constant paceClose, daily co-operation between business people and developers
  • 36. Agile manifesto - 12 principlesCustomer satisfaction by rapid delivery of useful softwareWelcome changing requirements, even late in developmentWorking software is delivered frequently (weeks rather than months)Working software is the principal measure of progressSustainable development, able to maintain a constant paceClose, daily co-operation between business people and developersFace-to-face conversation is the best form of communication (co-location)
  • 37. Agile manifesto - 12 principlesCustomer satisfaction by rapid delivery of useful softwareWelcome changing requirements, even late in developmentWorking software is delivered frequently (weeks rather than months)Working software is the principal measure of progressSustainable development, able to maintain a constant paceClose, daily co-operation between business people and developersFace-to-face conversation is the best form of communication (co-location)Projects are built around motivated individuals, who should be trusted
  • 38. Agile manifesto - 12 principlesCustomer satisfaction by rapid delivery of useful softwareWelcome changing requirements, even late in developmentWorking software is delivered frequently (weeks rather than months)Working software is the principal measure of progressSustainable development, able to maintain a constant paceClose, daily co-operation between business people and developersFace-to-face conversation is the best form of communication (co-location)Projects are built around motivated individuals, who should be trustedContinuous attention to technical excellence and good design
  • 39. Agile manifesto - 12 principlesCustomer satisfaction by rapid delivery of useful softwareWelcome changing requirements, even late in developmentWorking software is delivered frequently (weeks rather than months)Working software is the principal measure of progressSustainable development, able to maintain a constant paceClose, daily co-operation between business people and developersFace-to-face conversation is the best form of communication (co-location)Projects are built around motivated individuals, who should be trustedContinuous attention to technical excellence and good designSimplicity
  • 40. Agile manifesto - 12 principlesCustomer satisfaction by rapid delivery of useful softwareWelcome changing requirements, even late in developmentWorking software is delivered frequently (weeks rather than months)Working software is the principal measure of progressSustainable development, able to maintain a constant paceClose, daily co-operation between business people and developersFace-to-face conversation is the best form of communication (co-location)Projects are built around motivated individuals, who should be trustedContinuous attention to technical excellence and good designSimplicitySelf-organizing teams
  • 41. Agile manifesto - 12 principlesCustomer satisfaction by rapid delivery of useful softwareWelcome changing requirements, even late in developmentWorking software is delivered frequently (weeks rather than months)Working software is the principal measure of progressSustainable development, able to maintain a constant paceClose, daily co-operation between business people and developersFace-to-face conversation is the best form of communication (co-location)Projects are built around motivated individuals, who should be trustedContinuous attention to technical excellence and good designSimplicitySelf-organizing teamsRegular adaptation to changing circumstances
  • 42. Agile landscape
  • 43. Agile landscape
  • 44. Agile story so far
  • 45. Agile story so far
  • 46. Scrum process overview
  • 47. What is scrum?According to wikipedia:“Scrum (formerly scrummage), in the sports of rugby union and rugby league,is a way of restarting the game, either after an accidental infringement or whenthe ball has gone out of play.”Scrum in our case is aniterative and incrementalproject delivery frameworkLets get a feel...
  • 48. Iterative and incremental
  • 49. Iterative and incremental Incremental assumes we know what we want
  • 50. Iterative and incremental Incremental assumes we know what we want
  • 51. Iterative and incremental Incremental assumes we know what we want Iterative goes from rough to polished, allowing us to refine ideas over time
  • 52. Iterative and incremental Incremental assumes we know what we want Iterative goes from rough to polished, allowing us to refine ideas over time
  • 53. Origins of scrum “The ... ‘relay race’ approach to product development... may conflict with the goals of maximum speed and flexibility. Instead a holistic or ‘rugby’ approach -- where a team tries to go the distance as a unit, passing the ball back and forth - may better serve today’s competitive requirements.” Hirotaka Takeuchi and Ikujiro Nonaka, “The New New Product Development Game”, Harvard Business Review, January 1986
  • 54. Essence of Scrum
  • 55. Essence of ScrumThe team is given clear goalsThe team organizes itself around the workThe team regularly delivers the most valuable featuresThe team receives feedback from people outside itThe team reflects on its way of working in order to improveThe entire organization has visibility into the team’s progressThe team and management honestly communicate about progress and risks
  • 56. Whats in it for me?
  • 57. Whats in it for me?Select your own task and goal
  • 58. Whats in it for me?Select your own task and goalAutonomy and flexibility
  • 59. Whats in it for me?Select your own task and goalAutonomy and flexibilityLess rework, lesser frustration
  • 60. Whats in it for me?Select your own task and goalAutonomy and flexibilityLess rework, lesser frustrationMore development, less bug-fixing
  • 61. Whats in it for me?Select your own task and goalAutonomy and flexibilityLess rework, lesser frustrationMore development, less bug-fixingSuccessful product, successful company, successful individuals
  • 62. Whats in it for me?Select your own task and goalAutonomy and flexibilityLess rework, lesser frustrationMore development, less bug-fixingSuccessful product, successful company, successful individualsGet to be the talk of the town
  • 63. Whats in it for me?Select your own task and goalAutonomy and flexibilityLess rework, lesser frustrationMore development, less bug-fixingSuccessful product, successful company, successful individualsGet to be the talk of the townImpressive resume
  • 64. Whats in it for me?Select your own task and goalAutonomy and flexibilityLess rework, lesser frustrationMore development, less bug-fixingSuccessful product, successful company, successful individualsGet to be the talk of the townImpressive resumeIts more fun!!
  • 65. Whats in it for me?Select your own task and goalAutonomy and flexibilityLess rework, lesser frustrationMore development, less bug-fixingSuccessful product, successful company, successful individualsGet to be the talk of the townImpressive resumeIts more fun!!
  • 66. ExerciseTotal time: 10 minutes
  • 67. ExerciseFour volunteers, please!Total time: 10 minutes
  • 68. ExerciseFour volunteers, please!Round 1Total time: 10 minutes
  • 69. ExerciseFour volunteers, please!Round 1Each person flips all coinsTotal time: 10 minutes
  • 70. ExerciseFour volunteers, please!Round 1Each person flips all coinsWhen done with entire batch, pass to next personTotal time: 10 minutes
  • 71. ExerciseFour volunteers, please!Round 1Each person flips all coinsWhen done with entire batch, pass to next personRound 2Total time: 10 minutes
  • 72. ExerciseFour volunteers, please!Round 1Each person flips all coinsWhen done with entire batch, pass to next personRound 2Each person flips two coins and pass to next personTotal time: 10 minutes
  • 73. ExerciseFour volunteers, please!Round 1Each person flips all coinsWhen done with entire batch, pass to next personRound 2Each person flips two coins and pass to next personKeep flipping and passing until doneTotal time: 10 minutes
  • 74. ExerciseFour volunteers, please!Round 1Each person flips all coinsWhen done with entire batch, pass to next personRound 2Each person flips two coins and pass to next personKeep flipping and passing until doneRound 3Total time: 10 minutes
  • 75. ExerciseFour volunteers, please!Round 1Each person flips all coinsWhen done with entire batch, pass to next personRound 2Each person flips two coins and pass to next personKeep flipping and passing until doneRound 3Team creates its own rules to maximize penny flow in least amount of timeTotal time: 10 minutes
  • 76. Scrum - 50,000 ft view
  • 77. Scrum milestones
  • 78. Scrum terminology
  • 79. Scrum terminology Roles
  • 80. Scrum terminology RolesProduct OwnerScrum masterTeam
  • 81. Scrum terminology Roles Time-boxesProduct OwnerScrum masterTeam
  • 82. Scrum terminology Roles Time-boxesProduct Owner DiscoveryScrum master Release planningTeam Sprint planning Daily standup Sprint review Sprint retrospective
  • 83. Scrum terminology Roles Time-boxes ArtifactsProduct Owner DiscoveryScrum master Release planningTeam Sprint planning Daily standup Sprint review Sprint retrospective
  • 84. Scrum terminology Roles Time-boxes ArtifactsProduct Owner Discovery Product backlogScrum master Release planning Sprint backlogTeam Sprint planning Burn down chart Daily standup Velocity chart Sprint review Sprint retrospective
  • 85. Roles and responsibilities
  • 86. Product owner
  • 87. Product owner‘Ensures that team is building the right product’
  • 88. Product owner‘Ensures that team is building the right product’Right features delivered at the right time at the right price
  • 89. Product owner‘Ensures that team is building the right product’Right features delivered at the right time at the right priceOwns product vision
  • 90. Product owner‘Ensures that team is building the right product’Right features delivered at the right time at the right priceOwns product visionDefines features, decides on release and content
  • 91. Product owner‘Ensures that team is building the right product’Right features delivered at the right time at the right priceOwns product visionDefines features, decides on release and contentResponsible for market success
  • 92. Product owner‘Ensures that team is building the right product’Right features delivered at the right time at the right priceOwns product visionDefines features, decides on release and contentResponsible for market successPrioritizes features according to market value
  • 93. Product owner‘Ensures that team is building the right product’Right features delivered at the right time at the right priceOwns product visionDefines features, decides on release and contentResponsible for market successPrioritizes features according to market valueCan change features and priorities every Sprint
  • 94. Scrum master
  • 95. Scrum master‘Builds a high performance team and makes it highlyproductive’
  • 96. Scrum master‘Builds a high performance team and makes it highlyproductive’Acts like a sheep-dog/servant-leader
  • 97. Scrum master‘Builds a high performance team and makes it highlyproductive’Acts like a sheep-dog/servant-leaderResponsible for facilitating process
  • 98. Scrum master‘Builds a high performance team and makes it highlyproductive’Acts like a sheep-dog/servant-leaderResponsible for facilitating processFocuses team, protects them from external interruption
  • 99. Scrum master‘Builds a high performance team and makes it highlyproductive’Acts like a sheep-dog/servant-leaderResponsible for facilitating processFocuses team, protects them from external interruptionLooks for ways to enhance productivity
  • 100. Scrum master‘Builds a high performance team and makes it highlyproductive’Acts like a sheep-dog/servant-leaderResponsible for facilitating processFocuses team, protects them from external interruptionLooks for ways to enhance productivityAssists product owner in leveraging scrum
  • 101. The team
  • 102. The teamSmall group (7±2) containing all the necessary projectskills
  • 103. The teamSmall group (7±2) containing all the necessary projectskillsFocusses on steady delivery of high quality features
  • 104. The teamSmall group (7±2) containing all the necessary projectskillsFocusses on steady delivery of high quality featuresBrainstorms options for delivery
  • 105. The teamSmall group (7±2) containing all the necessary projectskillsFocusses on steady delivery of high quality featuresBrainstorms options for deliveryManages own work within sprint
  • 106. Roles and responsibilities
  • 107. Time-boxes
  • 108. Time-boxes Time-box Purpose Timing Attendees Team, PO, SM Orient team to project’s business value, the Start of projectDiscovery scrum process and one another 2-4 hr workshop and key stakeholders Determine what a release should include Start of release PO, SM and keyRelease planning and when it should be delivered 2-4 hrs stakeholders Elaborate, estimate, and prioritize highest- Start of each sprintSprint planning value product backlog items for sprint 2-4 hrs Team, SM, PO Facilitate rapid co-ordination between team DailyDaily stand-up members and with PO 10-15 minutes Team, SM, PO Team, PO, SM Demonstrate completed functionality to PO End of each sprintSprint review and interested stakeholders 1-1.5 hours and key stakeholders Reflect on whats working, whats not and End of each sprintSprint retrospective decide on action items 30-45 minutes Team, SM, PO
  • 109. Time-boxes Time-box Purpose Timing Attendees Team, PO, SM Orient team to project’s business value, the Start of projectDiscovery scrum process and one another 2-4 hr workshop and key stakeholders Determine what a release should include Start of release PO, SM and keyRelease planning and when it should be delivered 2-4 hrs stakeholders Elaborate, estimate, and prioritize highest- Start of each sprintSprint planning value product backlog items for sprint 2-4 hrs Team, SM, PO Facilitate rapid co-ordination between team DailyDaily stand-up members and with PO 10-15 minutes Team, SM, PO Team, PO, SM Demonstrate completed functionality to PO End of each sprintSprint review and interested stakeholders 1-1.5 hours and key stakeholders Reflect on whats working, whats not and End of each sprintSprint retrospective decide on action items 30-45 minutes Team, SM, PO
  • 110. Time-boxes Time-box Purpose Timing Attendees Team, PO, SM Orient team to project’s business value, the Start of projectDiscovery scrum process and one another 2-4 hr workshop and key stakeholders Determine what a release should include Start of release PO, SM and keyRelease planning and when it should be delivered 2-4 hrs stakeholders Elaborate, estimate, and prioritize highest- Start of each sprintSprint planning value product backlog items for sprint 2-4 hrs Team, SM, PO Facilitate rapid co-ordination between team DailyDaily stand-up members and with PO 10-15 minutes Team, SM, PO Team, PO, SM Demonstrate completed functionality to PO End of each sprintSprint review and interested stakeholders 1-1.5 hours and key stakeholders Reflect on whats working, whats not and End of each sprintSprint retrospective decide on action items 30-45 minutes Team, SM, PO
  • 111. Time-boxes Time-box Purpose Timing Attendees Team, PO, SM Orient team to project’s business value, the Start of projectDiscovery scrum process and one another 2-4 hr workshop and key stakeholders Determine what a release should include Start of release PO, SM and keyRelease planning and when it should be delivered 2-4 hrs stakeholders Elaborate, estimate, and prioritize highest- Start of each sprintSprint planning value product backlog items for sprint 2-4 hrs Team, SM, PO Facilitate rapid co-ordination between team DailyDaily stand-up members and with PO 10-15 minutes Team, SM, PO Team, PO, SM Demonstrate completed functionality to PO End of each sprintSprint review and interested stakeholders 1-1.5 hours and key stakeholders Reflect on whats working, whats not and End of each sprintSprint retrospective decide on action items 30-45 minutes Team, SM, PO
  • 112. Time-boxes Time-box Purpose Timing Attendees Team, PO, SM Orient team to project’s business value, the Start of projectDiscovery scrum process and one another 2-4 hr workshop and key stakeholders Determine what a release should include Start of release PO, SM and keyRelease planning and when it should be delivered 2-4 hrs stakeholders Elaborate, estimate, and prioritize highest- Start of each sprintSprint planning value product backlog items for sprint 2-4 hrs Team, SM, PO Facilitate rapid co-ordination between team DailyDaily stand-up members and with PO 10-15 minutes Team, SM, PO Team, PO, SM Demonstrate completed functionality to PO End of each sprintSprint review and interested stakeholders 1-1.5 hours and key stakeholders Reflect on whats working, whats not and End of each sprintSprint retrospective decide on action items 30-45 minutes Team, SM, PO
  • 113. Time-boxes Time-box Purpose Timing Attendees Team, PO, SM Orient team to project’s business value, the Start of projectDiscovery scrum process and one another 2-4 hr workshop and key stakeholders Determine what a release should include Start of release PO, SM and keyRelease planning and when it should be delivered 2-4 hrs stakeholders Elaborate, estimate, and prioritize highest- Start of each sprintSprint planning value product backlog items for sprint 2-4 hrs Team, SM, PO Facilitate rapid co-ordination between team DailyDaily stand-up members and with PO 10-15 minutes Team, SM, PO Team, PO, SM Demonstrate completed functionality to PO End of each sprintSprint review and interested stakeholders 1-1.5 hours and key stakeholders Reflect on whats working, whats not and End of each sprintSprint retrospective decide on action items 30-45 minutes Team, SM, PO
  • 114. Time-boxes Time-box Purpose Timing Attendees Team, PO, SM Orient team to project’s business value, the Start of projectDiscovery scrum process and one another 2-4 hr workshop and key stakeholders Determine what a release should include Start of release PO, SM and keyRelease planning and when it should be delivered 2-4 hrs stakeholders Elaborate, estimate, and prioritize highest- Start of each sprintSprint planning value product backlog items for sprint 2-4 hrs Team, SM, PO Facilitate rapid co-ordination between team DailyDaily stand-up members and with PO 10-15 minutes Team, SM, PO Team, PO, SM Demonstrate completed functionality to PO End of each sprintSprint review and interested stakeholders 1-1.5 hours and key stakeholders Reflect on whats working, whats not and End of each sprintSprint retrospective decide on action items 30-45 minutes Team, SM, PO
  • 115. Discovery session
  • 116. Discovery sessionBrief orientation to Agile process and the team
  • 117. Discovery sessionBrief orientation to Agile process and the teamAgile process training
  • 118. Discovery sessionBrief orientation to Agile process and the teamAgile process trainingSprint/Release cycles - 2 weeks ?
  • 119. Discovery sessionBrief orientation to Agile process and the teamAgile process trainingSprint/Release cycles - 2 weeks ?Overall business objective
  • 120. Discovery sessionBrief orientation to Agile process and the teamAgile process trainingSprint/Release cycles - 2 weeks ?Overall business objective“to help people discover, connect and trade easily”
  • 121. Discovery sessionBrief orientation to Agile process and the teamAgile process trainingSprint/Release cycles - 2 weeks ?Overall business objective“to help people discover, connect and trade easily”Agree to the definition of “Done”
  • 122. Definition of ‘Done’
  • 123. Definition of ‘Done’What does ‘done’ mean to a programmer?
  • 124. Definition of ‘Done’What does ‘done’ mean to a programmer?What does ‘done’ mean to a tester?
  • 125. Definition of ‘Done’What does ‘done’ mean to a programmer?What does ‘done’ mean to a tester?What does ‘done’ mean to a user using the site?
  • 126. Definition of ‘Done’What does ‘done’ mean to a programmer?What does ‘done’ mean to a tester?What does ‘done’ mean to a user using the site?What are the consequences of these definitionsbeing different?
  • 127. Definition of ‘Done’What does ‘done’ mean to a programmer?What does ‘done’ mean to a tester?What does ‘done’ mean to a user using the site?What are the consequences of these definitionsbeing different?How do we ensure a common definition?
  • 128. Agile planning overview
  • 129. Reality is messy
  • 130. Rolling wave planning
  • 131. Layers of product planning
  • 132. The big picture
  • 133. From idea to execution
  • 134. From idea to execution
  • 135. Agile Requirements
  • 136. User story template
  • 137. Acceptance criteria
  • 138. Pre-release life of a user story
  • 139. Decoupled requirements
  • 140. Beyond user storiesLow-fi prototypesHi-fi prototypes
  • 141. Agile Estimation
  • 142. Agile estimation basics
  • 143. Agile estimation basics Not precise but accurate Measure relative level of effort
  • 144. Agile estimation basics
  • 145. Agile estimation basicsEstimate relative level of effort for each feature
  • 146. Agile estimation basicsEstimate relative level of effort for each feature Measure complexity of work, not time to complete
  • 147. Agile estimation basicsEstimate relative level of effort for each feature Measure complexity of work, not time to complete Use relative units (e.g. A is half as hard as B)
  • 148. Agile estimation basicsEstimate relative level of effort for each feature Measure complexity of work, not time to complete Use relative units (e.g. A is half as hard as B)Use more than one person - planning poker
  • 149. Agile estimation basicsEstimate relative level of effort for each feature Measure complexity of work, not time to complete Use relative units (e.g. A is half as hard as B)Use more than one person - planning pokerMeasure velocity to set team capacity
  • 150. Agile estimation basicsEstimate relative level of effort for each feature Measure complexity of work, not time to complete Use relative units (e.g. A is half as hard as B)Use more than one person - planning pokerMeasure velocity to set team capacity Work actually completed over time gives accurate data to determine team capacity
  • 151. Agile estimation basicsEstimate relative level of effort for each feature Measure complexity of work, not time to complete Use relative units (e.g. A is half as hard as B)Use more than one person - planning pokerMeasure velocity to set team capacity Work actually completed over time gives accurate data to determine team capacity Takes into account external interruptions, technical surprises, developer skill level, domain knowledge etc.
  • 152. Agile estimation basics
  • 153. Agile estimation basics
  • 154. Agile estimation basics
  • 155. Agile estimation basics
  • 156. Planning poker
  • 157. Planning poker
  • 158. Velocity calculation
  • 159. Velocity tracking
  • 160. Scrum terminology
  • 161. Scrum terminology Roles
  • 162. Scrum terminology RolesProduct OwnerScrum masterTeam
  • 163. Scrum terminology Roles Time-boxesProduct OwnerScrum masterTeam
  • 164. Scrum terminology Roles Time-boxesProduct Owner DiscoveryScrum master Release planningTeam Sprint planning Daily standup Sprint review Sprint retrospective
  • 165. Scrum terminology Roles Time-boxes ArtifactsProduct Owner DiscoveryScrum master Release planningTeam Sprint planning Daily standup Sprint review Sprint retrospective
  • 166. Scrum terminology Roles Time-boxes ArtifactsProduct Owner Discovery Product backlogScrum master Release planning Sprint backlogTeam Sprint planning Burn down chart Daily standup Velocity chart Sprint review Sprint retrospective
  • 167. Release planning
  • 168. Release planning sample agenda
  • 169. Sprint planning
  • 170. Sprint planning essentials
  • 171. Sprint planning essentialsProduct owners discuss the top priority stories
  • 172. Sprint planning essentialsProduct owners discuss the top priority storiesThe team comes prepared with initial estimates which arethen discussed with PO
  • 173. Sprint planning essentialsProduct owners discuss the top priority storiesThe team comes prepared with initial estimates which arethen discussed with POAcceptance criteria is jointly discussed and clarified
  • 174. Sprint planning essentialsProduct owners discuss the top priority storiesThe team comes prepared with initial estimates which arethen discussed with POAcceptance criteria is jointly discussed and clarifiedLength of sprint planning is proportional to length of sprint
  • 175. Sprint planning essentialsProduct owners discuss the top priority storiesThe team comes prepared with initial estimates which arethen discussed with POAcceptance criteria is jointly discussed and clarifiedLength of sprint planning is proportional to length of sprintVolunteering for tasks instead of task assignment
  • 176. Sprint planning essentialsProduct owners discuss the top priority storiesThe team comes prepared with initial estimates which arethen discussed with POAcceptance criteria is jointly discussed and clarifiedLength of sprint planning is proportional to length of sprintVolunteering for tasks instead of task assignment4 hours for 2 week sprint
  • 177. Sprint backlog
  • 178. Sprint backlog
  • 179. Sprint backlog
  • 180. Sprint backlog
  • 181. Burn down chart
  • 182. Burn down chartTask based burn down
  • 183. Burn down chartTask based burn down
  • 184. Burn down chartStory based burn down Days Done Remaining Ideal Done Per Day Ideal Velocity Initial Value 0 0 150 10 150 1 0 150 10 140 2 5 145 10 130 3 3 142 10 120 4 15 127 10 110 5 10 117 10 100 6 8 109 10 90 7 13 96 10 80 8 24 72 10 70 9 28 44 10 60 10 10 34 10 50 11 15 19 10 40 12 13 6 10 30 13 3 3 10 20 14 2 1 10 10 15 1 0 0
  • 185. Burn down chartStory based burn down 150 150 Iteration 1 Burn Down Chart 150 145 142 127 125 117 109 100 96Points 72 75 50 44 34 25 19 6 3 1 0 0 Time in Days Remaining Ideal Velocity
  • 186. Daily Stand-upsShare commitmentCommunicate daily status, progress, and plans to the team and any observersIdentify obstacles so that the team can take steps to remove themSet direction and focusBuild a team
  • 187. Daily Stand-ups - What to do?What did I get done yesterday?What will I do today?What is on my way?
  • 188. Impediment BacklogList of things that are preventing the team from progressing orimprovingThe ScrumMaster must bulldoze out of the wayFrom getting the coffee machine fixed to replacing the CEO!A good ScrumMaster will remove impediments within 24 hours
  • 189. Effective daily stand-upsQuickness and high energyLong, low-energy meetings tend to distract and mute the day.SupportiveSelf-managed
  • 190. Who attends?Pigs - Committed - contribute to the completion of the current iterationChickens - Involved - interested in status but do not contributePeople who are committed are allowed to speak
  • 191. What it is not?
  • 192. What it is not?Not a social gathering
  • 193. What it is not?Not a social gatheringNot for problem solving
  • 194. What it is not?Not a social gatheringNot for problem solvingNot a reporting exercise
  • 195. What it is not?Not a social gatheringNot for problem solvingNot a reporting exercise
  • 196. What it is not?Not a social gatheringNot for problem solvingNot a reporting exerciseTo synchronize your efforts towards the goal
  • 197. What it is not?Not a social gatheringNot for problem solvingNot a reporting exerciseTo synchronize your efforts towards the goalCommitment to the goal, not just the tasks
  • 198. Rules - Most important Same place same time - XX A.M. 15 minutes max Attendance mandatory / Attend by proxy Each week one person responsible Late arrival pays Rs. 50 Impediment log Can be updated outside of stand-ups
  • 199. Sprint review
  • 200. Sprint review
  • 201. Scrum Retrospective
  • 202. Scrum Retrospective
  • 203. Scrum Retrospective - Prime‘Regardless of what we discover,we understand and truly believethat everyone did the best jobthey could, given what they knewat the time, their skills andabilities, the resources available,and the situation at hand.’
  • 204. Basecamp implementation PO Decomposed Initial specs, New Approved into user stories Acceptance criteriaIdeas (prioritized) features (to-do list) and testable examples (Based on discussion prioritized with stakeholders) Product ideas Product backlog Sprint backlog Sprint planning Broken down into tasks Dev review and discussion (to-do) along with hour estimate based estimates on SP Current sprint
  • 205. Team room examples
  • 206. Team room examples
  • 207. Team room examples
  • 208. Team room examples
  • 209. Team room videoshttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=66MICSQ0aX8http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rrfXRBiBsU0http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VjNxQ-a-x2M
  • 210. How can we fail?Lack of resolve bypeople to overcomethe problems thatScrum will expose
  • 211. Questions?