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Make This in China
 

Make This in China

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Making good software with great offshore teams in China. Some key points to consider.

Making good software with great offshore teams in China. Some key points to consider.

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  • You got to define, explain, and evolve a product - all with a team in China. <br /> <br /> Good software products are hard to make. Its even harder to produce good software with a distributed team in China. <br /> <br /> Here are some key factors that can position you to greater chance of success. <br />
  • You got to define, explain, and evolve a product - all with a team in China. <br /> <br /> Good software products are hard to make. Its even harder to produce good software with a distributed team in China. <br /> <br /> Here are some key factors that can position you to greater chance of success. <br />
  • You got to define, explain, and evolve a product - all with a team in China. <br /> <br /> Good software products are hard to make. Its even harder to produce good software with a distributed team in China. <br /> <br /> Here are some key factors that can position you to greater chance of success. <br />
  • Assumption: The team will not know unless someone tells them. <br /> You can tell them the program needs to add 2 + 2. <br /> Don’t stop there: tell them what good will this addition do? Spark their curiosity, bring their heads in the game <br />
  • It should result in a better WHAT. <br /> why? Because going from Reqts-> Design will result in a Requirement explosion of up to 50 times of original requirements. <br /> Who is filling these requirements gaps? <br />
  • Derived requirements need localized decision making or else time will be lost. <br /> Architecture and Design issues will come up - these need resolution earlier in the game. <br /> Unidirectional flow of decisions will remove sense of collective ownership. <br /> Allow for course correction and mistake forgiveness but dont prevent local decision making. <br />
  • Expectation setting for DONE. <br /> Corollary is that if its NOT DONE - dont call it DONE. <br /> Extra points for pointing out things that still remain. <br /> Early issue identification is rewarded. <br /> DONT HIDE THE REALITY. <br /> Are Unit Tests done <br /> Are Integration Tests done. <br /> Any non-functional testing done? <br /> Any cross browser type testing done? <br /> Less functionality but done functionality. <br />
  • Factors which contribute to Inter-group success. <br /> 1. is there knowledge sharing between the groups? <br /> 2. is there open communication between the groups? <br /> 3. do groups try to outdo each other or help each other succeed? <br /> 4. each group committed to objectives and success? <br />
  • Chinese cultural factors: <br /> 1. centralization of authority <br /> 2. Directed style of management <br /> 3. Asking subordinates for opinion is uncommon <br /> ---> impact <br /> 1. learning from superiors is common <br /> 2. questioning superiors is uncommon <br /> <br /> how will you overcome this ? in software industry its less of a problem but still a problem <br /> direct impact on artifact reviews. <br />
  • Tolerance for ambiguity - high degrees of this factor may kill your product. <br /> 1. how will you make sure ambiguity is minimized <br /> 2. free flow of information to remove ambiguity <br /> 3. specifications that have recurring ambiguity will tend to be ignored <br /> <br /> how will you overcome this? <br /> <br /> <br />
  • - treating ingroup/outgroup members differently. <br /> - knowledge sharing in outgroup less than ingroup <br /> - real issue of trusting outgroup stakeholder commitments <br /> - how will you break the us versus them mentality? <br /> - blurring the boundaries of ingroup and outgroup helps <br />
  • Questions = Sign that you are stupid <br /> - Need to reverse this mentality by example. ( i used to ask a lot of questions to outgroups. gradually team got comfortable following my example). <br /> <br /> - Asking for help is a sign of weakness. <br /> <br /> - Substitute this fear/anxiety with Reciprocity principle: i will help you if you will help me. <br /> <br /> - If you improve my product, I will help you improve yours <br /> <br /> - Pronounced when dealing with Outgroup members <br /> <br /> <br />
  • <br />

Make This in China Make This in China Presentation Transcript

  • Make This in China Thursday, March 26, 2009
  • Make This in China Thursday, March 26, 2009
  • Make This in China Thursday, March 26, 2009
  • Make This in China Thursday, March 26, 2009
  • Most important word when describing the product: WHY? Thursday, March 26, 2009
  • Expected Result: A better “WHAT?” Thursday, March 26, 2009
  • Two Way Decisions Global Vision but Localized Decision Making Thursday, March 26, 2009
  • Um, looks almost done..... Clear and present definition of done Thursday, March 26, 2009
  • Impact of Chinese culture on success factors Knowledge sharing Communication Mutual support Stakeholder commitment Thursday, March 26, 2009
  • Power Distance: The perceived freedom to question superiors Thursday, March 26, 2009
  • Uncer tainty Avoidance: The path to clarity Thursday, March 26, 2009
  • Individualism/Collectivism: Level of outgroup trust Thursday, March 26, 2009
  • Concern for face: Reviews Clarifications Thursday, March 26, 2009
  • Reference Cultural Impact on Intergroup Coordination in Software Development in China: A Qualitative Analysis by Minghui Yuan & Doug Vogel City University of Hong Kong 2006 Thursday, March 26, 2009