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Chap005 MIS
 

Chap005 MIS

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    Chap005 MIS Chap005 MIS Presentation Transcript

    • 1Chapter 5 Introduction to e-Business SystemsMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 2 Learning ObjectivesGive examples of how Internet and other information technologies support business processes within the business functions of .. Accounting, Finance, Human resource management, Marketing, and Production and operations management.McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 3 Learning Objectives (continued)Identify the following cross-functional system concepts, and how they can provide significant business value to a company: Cross-functional enterprise systems Enterprise application integration Transaction processing systems Enterprise collaboration systemsMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 4 Section I Functional Business SystemsMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 5 IT in Business“Business managers are moving from a tradition where they could avoid, delegate, or ignore decisions about IT to one where they cannot create a marketing, product, international, organization, or financial plan that does not involve such decisions.”McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 6 Marketing SystemsMarketing Information Systems provide information technologies that support major components of the marketing function. Interactive Marketing Customer focused marketing process Based on using Internet, intranets, & extranets to establish two-way communications between customers or potential customers and the business Customers become involved in product development, delivery, & service issuesMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 7 Marketing Systems (continued) Targeted marketing Five targeting components Community Content Context Demographic/psychographic Online behaviorMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 8 Marketing Systems (continued) Sales Force Automation The sales force is connected to marketing websites on the Internet, extranets, & the company intranet Increases productivity of sales force Speeds up the capture & analysis of sales data Allows management to provide improved delivery information & better support of the sales force.McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 9 Manufacturing SystemsSupport the production/operations functionAssists firms in planning, monitoring, & controlling inventories, purchases, & the flow of goods and servicesMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 10 Manufacturing Systems (continued) Computer-Integrated Manufacturing (CIM)  Simplify  Automate  Integrate Supports the concepts of flexible manufacturing systems, agile manufacturing, & total quality management  Computer-Aided Engineering (CAE)  Computer-Aided Design (CAD)  Material Requirements Planning (MRP)McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 11 Manufacturing Systems (continued)Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM) Automate the production processManufacturing Execution Systems (MES) Performance monitoring systems for factory floor operationsMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 12 Manufacturing Systems (continued)Process Control The use of computers to control an ongoing physical processMachine Control The use of a computer to control the actions of a machine. Also called numerical controlMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 13 Human Resource SystemsHuman Resource Information Systems Support Planning to meet the personnel needs of the business Development of employees to their full potential Recruitment, selection, & hiring Job placementMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 14 Human Resource Systems (continued)Human Resource Information Systems (continued) Performance appraisals Employee benefits analysis Training and development Health, safety, & securityMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 15 Human Resource Systems (continued)HRM and the Internet Allows companies to process most common HRM applications over their intranets. Allows companies to provide around-the- clock services to their employees. Allows companies to disseminate valuable information faster. Allows employees to perform HRM tasks online.McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 16 Human Resource Systems (continued) Staffing Supported by information systems that record and track human resources to maximize their use Training and Development Help human resource managers plan and monitor employee recruitment, training, and development programsMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 17 Accounting SystemsRecord and report business transactions and other economic eventsOnline Accounting SystemsMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 18 Accounting Systems (continued)Six widely used accounting systems Order processing Captures & processes customer orders and produces data needed for sales analysis and inventory control Inventory Control Processes data reflecting changes in items in inventory. Helps provide high-quality service while minimizing investment in inventory & inventory carrying costsMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 19 Accounting Systems (continued) Accounts Receivable Keeps records of amounts owed by customers from data generated by customer purchases and payments Accounts Payable Keeps track of data concerning purchases from, and payments to, suppliersMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 20 Accounting Systems (continued) Payroll Receives and maintains data from employee time cards and other work records General Ledger Consolidates data received from accounts receivable, accounts payable, payroll, & other accounting information systemsMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 21 Financial Management SystemsSupports financial managers in decisions concerning The financing of the business The allocation & control of financial resources within the business.McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 22 Financial Management Systems (continued)Major financial management system categories Cash Management Collects information on all cash receipts and disbursements on a real-time or periodic basisMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 23 Financial Management Systems (continued) Investment Management Helps the financial manager make buy, sell, or hold decisions for each type of security Helps the financial manager develop the optimum mix of securities in order to minimize risk and maximize returnMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 24 Financial Management Systems (continued) Capital Budgeting Involves evaluating the profitability and financial impact of proposed capital expenditures Allows financial managers to analyze long- term expenditure proposals for plant and equipmentMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 25 Financial Management System (continued) Financial Forecasting & Planning Evaluate the present and projected financial performance of the company Help determine financing needs and analyze alternative methods of financing Explore what-if and goal-seeking questionsMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 26 Section II Cross-Functional Enterprise SystemsMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 27 Cross-Functional Enterprise ApplicationsIntegrated combinations of information subsystems that share information resources and support business processes across the functional unitsA strategic way to use IT to share information resources & improve efficiency & effectivenessMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 28 Cross-Functional Enterprise Applications (continued) Enterprise Application ArchitectureMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 29 Cross-Functional Enterprise Applications (continued) Focused on accomplishing fundamental business processes in concert with the company’s customer, supplier, partner, & employee stakeholdersMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 30 Enterprise Application Integration (EAI)Software enables users to model the business processes involved in the interactions that should occur between business applications.Also provides middleware that Performs data conversion & coordination Provides application communication & messaging services Provides access to the application interfacesMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 31 Enterprise Application Integration (continued)Business value Integrates front-office and back-office applications to allow for quicker, more effective response to business events and customer demands Improves customer and suppler experience with the business because of its responsiveness.McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 32 Transaction Processing Systems Cross-functional information systems that process data resulting from the occurrence of business transactions  Transactions – events that occur as part of doing business  Sales  Purchases  Deposits  Withdrawals  Refunds  PaymentsMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 33 Transaction Processing Systems (continued) Online transaction processing systems Real-time systems that capture and process transactions immediately Adds value to product or service through superior customer serviceMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 34 Transaction Processing Systems (continued)Transaction Processing Cycle  Data entry  The capture of business data  Transaction processing  Two basic ways  Batch processing where transaction data are accumulated & processed periodically  Real-time processing where data are processed immediately after a transaction occursMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 35 Transaction Processing Systems (continued) Database maintenance Corporate databases are updated to reflect the day-to-day business transactions Document and report generation A variety of documents and reports are producedMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 36 Transaction Processing Systems (continued) Inquiry processing Inquiries and responses concerning the results of transaction processing activityMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 37 Transaction Processing Systems (continued)McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 38 Enterprise Collaboration SystemsCross-functional e-business systems that enhance communication, coordination, & collaboration Communicate – share information with each other Coordinate – coordinate individual work efforts & use of resources with each other. Collaborate – work together cooperatively on joint projects and assignmentsMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 39 Enterprise Collaboration Systems (continued)Tools for Enterprise Collaboration Electronic communication E-mail Voice mail Fax Web publishing Bulletin boards Paging Internet phone systemsMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 40 Enterprise Collaboration Systems (continued) Electronic conferencing Data & voice conferencing Videoconferencing Chat systems Discussion forums Electronic meeting systems Synchronous. Team members can meet at the same time and place in a “decision room” settingMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 41 Enterprise Collaboration Systems (continued) Collaborative work management Calendaring & scheduling Task & project management Workflow systems Knowledge managementMcGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 42 Discussion QuestionsWhy is there a trend toward cross-functional integrated enterprise systems in business?Referring to the example on Dell Computer, what other solutions could there be for the problem of information system incompatibility in business besides EAI systems?McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 43 Discussion Questions (continued)Referring to the Charles Schwab & Co. example, what are the most important HR applications a company could offer to its employees via a Web-based system?How do you think sales force automation affects salesperson productivity, marketing management, and competitive advantage?McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 44 Discussion Questions (continued)How can Internet technologies be involved in improving a process in one of the functions of business?What are several e-business applications that you might recommend to a small company to help it survive and succeed in challenging economic times?McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 45 Discussion Questions (continued)Which of the 14 tools for enterprise collaboration do you feel are essential for any business to have today? Which do you feel are optional?Referring to the General Electric example, how do enterprise collaboration systems contribute to bottom-line profits for a business?McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 46 Real World Case 1 – Cypress Semiconductor & FleetBostonHow does the use of Internet technologies to support the marketing function at Cypress Semiconductor improve business and customer value?What are the benefits and potential challenges of FleetBoston’s use of IT to support their targeted marketing programs?McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 47 Real World Case 1 (continued)Why do IT-based targeted marketing programs sometimes produce negative business results?How can negative business results be avoided?McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 48 Real World Case 1 (continued)How can customer segmentation and targeted marketing programs that focus on customer profitability avoid “ignoring customers with low current returns but high potential”?McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 49 Real World Case 2 – Johnson ControlsWhy is the exchange of “tribal knowledge” important in product design?How do Web-based systems support such collaborations?McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 50 Real World Case 2 (continued)Why is it important to provide visibility throughout a supply chain?How is JCI attempting to provide this visibility?McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 51 Real World Case 2 (continued)What is the business value of JCI’s B2B portal?Can collaboration systems improve the quality of the products that are designed, as well as reducing the cost and time of the design process?McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 52 Real World Case 3 – Union Pacific, Corporate Express, & Best BuyHow could an enterprise application integration system help a firm to better serve its customers?How could enterprise application systems improve a company’s business interactions with its suppliers?McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 53 Real World Case 3 (continued)What major challenges are faced by businesses that implement EAI initiatives?How can companies meet those challenges?McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 54 Real World Case 4 – Baxter InternationalWhat key HR applications are provided by Baxter’s Web-based HR system?What are some other Web-based HR applications they might implement?McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 55 Real World Case 4 (continued)What business value does Baxter derive from their Web-based HR approach?What value do their employees receive from such HR systems?McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 56 Real World Case 4 (continued)How could viewing employees as customers or clients change how HR services are provided to employees by Web-based HR systems?McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 57 Real World Case 5 – IBM CorporationWhy have many companies been reluctant to support instant messaging in the workplace?What are the advantages of instant messaging over e-mail and voice mail for enterprise collaboration?McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 58 Real World Case 5 (continued)What do you see as the major disadvantages of using instant messenger instead of e-mail or voice mail?Do you recommend that companies encourage and support the use of IM tools for enterprise collaboration?McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.