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Foodpowerpoint
 

Foodpowerpoint

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Food Powerpoint

Food Powerpoint

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    Foodpowerpoint Foodpowerpoint Presentation Transcript

    • Teaching with Integrity
      • Allen T. Mishler
      • 10650 Culebra Road Suite 104 – PMB549
      • San Antonio, Texas 78251
      • 210-393-9426
      • https://www.teachingwithintegrity.com
      • Copyright (C) 2010 Teaching with Integrity. All Rights Reserved
    • The report, based on U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data, says the top 10 riskiest foods regulated by the FDA are: Research by HHS and CDC
      • Ten Riskiest Foods for Foodborne Illness
      • Ten Least Wanted Pathogens
    • Ten Riskiest Foods for Foodborne Illness < Ten Least Wanted Pathogens >
      • Leafy Greens
      • 363 outbreaks involving 13,568 reported cases of illness.
      • Campylobacter
      • Second most common bacterial cause of diarrhea in the United States. Sources: raw and undercooked poultry and other meat, raw milk and untreated water.
    • Ten Riskiest Foods for Foodborne Illness < Ten Least Wanted Pathogens >
      • Eggs
      • 352 outbreaks with 11,163 reported cases of illness.
      • Clostridium botulinum
      • This organism produces a toxin which causes botulism, a life-threatening illness that can prevent the breathing muscles from moving air in and out of the lungs. Sources: improperly prepared home-canned foods; honey should not be fed to children less than 12 months old.
    • Ten Riskiest Foods for Foodborne Illness < Ten Least Wanted Pathogens >
      • Tuna
      • 268 outbreaks with 2,341 reported cases of illness.
      • E. coli O157:H7
      • A bacterium that can produce a deadly toxin and causes approximately 73,000 cases of foodborne illness each year in the U.S. Sources: beef, especially undercooked or raw hamburger; produce; raw milk; and unpasteurized juices and ciders.
    • Ten Riskiest Foods for Foodborne Illness < Ten Least Wanted Pathogens >
      • Oysters
      • 132 outbreaks with 3,409 reported cases of illness.
      • Listeria monocytogenes Causes listeriosis, a serious disease for pregnant women, newborns, and adults with a weakened immune system. Sources: unpasteurized dairy products, including soft cheeses; sliced deli meats; smoked fish; hot dogs; pate'; and deli-prepared salads (i.e. egg, ham, seafood, and chicken salads).
    • Ten Riskiest Foods for Foodborne Illness < Ten Least Wanted Pathogens >
      • Potatoes
      • 108 outbreaks with 3,659 reported cases of illness.
      • Norovirus
      • The leading viral cause of diarrhea in the United States. Poor hygiene causes Norovirus to be easily passed from person to person and from infected individuals to food items. Sources: Any food contaminated by someone who is infected with this virus.
    • Ten Riskiest Foods for Foodborne Illness < Ten Least Wanted Pathogens >
      • Cheese
      • 83 outbreaks with 2,761 reported cases of illness.
      • Salmonella
      • Most common bacterial cause of diarrhea in the United States, and the most common cause of foodborne deaths. Responsible for 1.4 million cases of foodborne illness a year. Sources: raw and undercooked eggs, undercooked poultry and meat, fresh fruits and vegetables, and unpasteurized dairy products.
    • Ten Riskiest Foods for Foodborne Illness < Ten Least Wanted Pathogens >
      • Ice Cream
      • 74 outbreaks with 2,594 reported cases of illness.
      • Staphylococcus aureus
      • This bacterium produces a toxin that causes vomiting shortly after being ingested. Sources: cooked foods high in protein (e.g. cooked ham, salads, bakery products, dairy products) that are held too long at room temperature.
    • Ten Riskiest Foods for Foodborne Illness < Ten Least Wanted Pathogens >
      • Tomatoes
      • 31 outbreaks with 3,292 reported cases of illness.
      • Shigella
      • Causes an estimated 448,000 cases of diarrhea illnesses per year. Poor hygiene causes Shigella to be easily passed from person to person and from infected individuals to food items. Sources: salads, unclean water, and any food handled by someone who is infected with the bacterium.
    • Ten Riskiest Foods for Foodborne Illness < Ten Least Wanted Pathogens >
      • Sprouts
      • 31 outbreaks with 2,022 reported cases of illness.
      • Toxoplasma gondii Aparasite that causes toxoplasmosis, a very severe disease that can produce central nervous system disorders particularly mental retardation and visual impairment in children. Pregnant women and people with weakened immune systems are at higher risk. Sources: raw or undercooked pork.
    • Ten Riskiest Foods for Foodborne Illness < Ten Least Wanted Pathogens >
      • Berries
      • 25 outbreaks with 3,397 reported cases of illness.
      • Vibrio vulnificus
      • Causes gastroenteritis, wound infection, and severe bloodstream infections. People with liver diseases are especially at high risk. Sources: raw or undercooked seafood, particularly shellfish.
    • Foodborne illness
      • (also foodborne disease and colloquially referred to as food poisoning ) is any illness resulting from the consumption of contaminated food.
      • There are two types of food poisoning: food infection and food intoxication. Food infection refers to the presence of bacteria or other microbes which infect the body after consumption. Food intoxication refers to the ingestion of toxins contained within the food, including bacterially produced exotoxins, which can happen even when the microbe that produced the toxin is no longer present or able to cause infection. In spite of the common term food poisoning, most cases are caused by a variety of pathogenic bacteria, viruses, prions or parasites that contaminate food, rather than chemical or natural toxins.