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 GENDER MOTIVATION EXPERIENCES IN STUDYING A LANGUAGES LEVEL OF PROFICIENCY CULTURAL BACKGROUNDS
   Several studies have established the existence of gender differences in the use of    language learning strategies. In...
   According to Gardner (1985), motivation and attitudes are the primary sources    contributing to individual language l...
   Experience in studying language is also regarded one of the factors that it is claimed    may affect the choices of la...
   Generally, the results of the studies which have investigated the relationship between    language proficiency and LLS...
   Despite the fact that learners of different cultural backgrounds tend to use particular    kinds of strategies, it is ...
THE END
Factors affecting second language strategy use
Factors affecting second language strategy use
Factors affecting second language strategy use
Factors affecting second language strategy use
Factors affecting second language strategy use
Factors affecting second language strategy use
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Factors affecting second language strategy use

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Transcript of "Factors affecting second language strategy use"

  1. 1.  GENDER MOTIVATION EXPERIENCES IN STUDYING A LANGUAGES LEVEL OF PROFICIENCY CULTURAL BACKGROUNDS
  2. 2.  Several studies have established the existence of gender differences in the use of language learning strategies. In a recent study, Hong-Nam and Leavell (2006), for example, investigated learning strategy use of 55 students learning English as a second language (ESL) with differing cultural and linguistic background: Brazil, China, German, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Taiwan, Thailand, and Togo. The results showed the students preferred to use Metacognitive strategies, whereas they depicted the least use of Affective and Memory strategies in overall strategy. Mean differences revealed that females engaged in strategy use more frequently than males. Also, female participants reported using Social and Metacognitive strategies most and Memory strategies the least. while males favored the use of Metacognitive and Compensation strategies most and Affective strategies the least. Although research studies on learning strategies and gender are common, reflecting a distinction in strategy use between males and females, the relationship between gender and learning strategies are not explicit due to conflicting results generated by previous studies. Therefore, more studies are needed to verify the role of gender in determining learning strategies.
  3. 3.  According to Gardner (1985), motivation and attitudes are the primary sources contributing to individual language learning. Gardner has described the phenomenon of motivation as consisting of four components: a goal, effort, want, and attitudes toward the learning activity. In addition, the concept of motivation can be classified into two orientations of reasons: instrumental and integrative. This orientation occurs when students wish to truly become part of the culture of the language being learned. An instrumental orientation is more self-oriented, described as when students have utilitarian reasons such as they want to pass an exam or they want to get a job. Dörnyei (2001), one of the well-known leaders within the field of motivation also states, generally, motivation can be a matter explaining why people decide to do something, how long they are willing to sustain the activity, and how hard they are going to pursue it. Similarly, Oxford and Nyikos (1989) indicate that the learners with high motivation to learn a language will likely use a variety of strategies.
  4. 4.  Experience in studying language is also regarded one of the factors that it is claimed may affect the choices of language learning strategies. However, a small number of studies have been carried out investigating the relationship between the experience of English study and language strategy use. Purdie and Oliver (1999) reported the language learning strategies used by bilingual school-aged children coming from three main cultural groups: Asian (predominantly Vietnamese or Chinese dialect speakers), European (children who spoke Greek and those who identified themselves as speakers of Macedonian), and speakers of Arabic. The results showed students who had been in Australia for a longer period of time (3 or less years and 4 or more) obtained significantly higher mean scores for Cognitive strategies and for Memory strategies. These findings, thus, can serve as the insight that experience in studying a language can affect the language learning strategy choices. Purdie and Olive’s study(1999) highlights the importance of experience in studying a language as one of the factors affecting the choices of language learning strategies. As a result of their study, studying abroad is deemed to have an influence on students’ thought and learning style, especially in their actual ability in language learning. These findings are congruent with Oxford’s (1996) conclusion, exerting that there are other factors including culture and nationality that can influence on learning strategies’ choice. However, in the light of the influence of studying or staying abroad on language learning strategies, these studies confirm the roles of experiences in studying a language as an important factor affecting the choices of language learning strategies.
  5. 5.  Generally, the results of the studies which have investigated the relationship between language proficiency and LLS use indicate that high proficient learners use greater and wider variety of LLSs. O’Malley et al. (1985a) found that ESL school beginners reported using more strategies than did the students from the intermediate level. In another study conducted on school learners of Spanish and Russian, O’Malley and Chamot (1990) found that beginners reported less use of strategies than did those from the intermediate level. Using interviews with under-achieving learners in English language schools in London, Porte (1988) found that they used vocabulary strategies similar to those used by good language learners. In a study of 1200 undergraduate foreign language learners, Oxford and Nyikos (1989) found that greater strategy use accompanied perceptions of higher proficiency and that those who had been studying the language for four or five years used more strategies than did those who were less experienced language learners.
  6. 6.  Despite the fact that learners of different cultural backgrounds tend to use particular kinds of strategies, it is difficult to say that previous studies and research have comprehensively investigated the effects of cultural background in determining strategy preferences. The main finding in Bedells (1993) study cited in Oxford, et. al. (1995) was that learners from various cultural backgrounds use certain types of strategies at different levels of frequency. According to Politzer and McGroarty (1985), Asian students tend to prefer rote memorization strategies and rule-oriented strategies. In their study, Politzer and McGroarty (1985) administered a questionnaire to 18 Asian learners (mainly Japanese) and 19 Hispanics (Latin American speakers of Spanish) enrolled in a preparatory course for graduate study in the USA to investigate the relationship between the students’ L1 background/ethnicity and their strategy use. The study revealed that Asian students scored lower than the Hispanic learners on the scale of good language behaviours. Politzer and McGroarty (1985:113-114) claim that classroom behaviours such as asking the teacher, correcting classmates, volunteering answers and other social interaction behaviours such as asking for help and asking others to repeat are apparently more a part of the Western rather than the Asian repertoire.
  7. 7. THE END
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