INTRO TO MANAGMENT  TRUST AND TRUST     BUILDINGSuB TO : COL.Muhammad RafaqatSUB BY: NC AMIR HUSSAIN       ASC AQIB MEHMOO...
Trust and Trust Building"Trust is a peculiar resource; it is built rather than depleted by use." –UnknownOrigins and Devel...
Ability refers to an assessment of the others knowledge, skill, or competency.This dimension recognizes that trust require...
cognitively-driven trust phenomenon, grounded in judgments of the trusteespredictability and reliability.Through repeated ...
1.   Share information openly and broadly  2.   Stay accessible and visible to each other  3.   Engage hard questions; ans...
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Trust Building

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NC AMIR HUSSIAN
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Trust Building

  1. 1. INTRO TO MANAGMENT TRUST AND TRUST BUILDINGSuB TO : COL.Muhammad RafaqatSUB BY: NC AMIR HUSSAIN ASC AQIB MEHMOOD PC WAQAR AHMADCOURSE : BESE 17 ADate : 25-5-2012
  2. 2. Trust and Trust Building"Trust is a peculiar resource; it is built rather than depleted by use." –UnknownOrigins and Development of TrustArmed with a definition of trust and a description of the benefits it brings, wenow turn to examine its origins and development. Theory on the origins ofinterpersonal trust has proceeded broadly along three fronts:(1) explaining differences in the individual propensity to trust,(2) understanding dimensions of trustworthy behavior,(3) suggesting levels of trust development.Individual propensity to trustPersonality theorists have developed one of the oldest theoreticalperspectives on trust, and argued that some people are more likely to trustthan others. Viewed as a fairly stable trait over time, trust is regarded as ageneralized expectancy that other people can be relied on. This expectancy isa function of the degree to which trust has been honored in that individualshistory of prior social interactions, and may have its most pronounced effectin novel or ambiguous situations. While this expectancy shapes perceptions ofthe character of people in general, more recent work has identified thecharacteristics of trustees that allow for the formation of trust and its growthto higher levels.Dimensions of trustworthy behaviorOur trust in another individual can be grounded in our evaluation of his/herability, integrity, and benevolence. That is, the more we observe thesecharacteristics in another person, our level of trust in that person is likely togrow.
  3. 3. Ability refers to an assessment of the others knowledge, skill, or competency.This dimension recognizes that trust requires some sense that the other isable to perform in a manner that meets our expectations.Integrity is the degree to which the trustee adheres to principles that areacceptable to the trustor. This dimension leads to trust based on consistencyof past actions, credibility of communication, commitment to standards offairness, and the congruence of the others word and deed.Benevolence is our assessment that the trusted individual is concerned enoughabout our welfare to either advance our interests, or at least not impede them.The others perceived intentions or motives of the trustee are most central.Honest and open communication, delegating decisions, and sharing controlindicate evidence of ones benevolence.Although these three dimensions are likely to be linked to each other, theyeach contribute separately to influence the level of trust in another within arelationship. However, ability and integrity are likely to be most influentialearly in a relationship, as information on ones benevolence needs more timeto emerge. The effect of benevolence will increase as the relationship betweenthe parties grows closer. The next section describes trust development inrelationships in more detail.Levels of trust developmentAt early stages of a relationship, trust is at a calculus-based level. In otherwords, an individual will carefully calculate how the other party is likely tobehave in a given situation depending on the rewards for being trustworthyand the deterrents against untrustworthy behavior. In this manner, rewardsand punishments form the basis of control that a trustor has in ensuring thetrustees behavioral consistency. Individuals deciding to trust the othermentally contemplate the benefits of staying in the relationship with thetrustee versus the benefits of cheating on the relationship, and the costs ofstaying in the relationship versus the costs of breaking the relationship. Trustwill only be extended to the other to the extent that this cost-benefitcalculation indicates that the continued trust will yield a net positive benefit.Over time, calculus-based trust (CBT) can be built as individuals manage theirreputation and assure the stability of their behavior by behaving consistently,meeting agreed-to deadlines, and fulfilling promises. CBT is a largely
  4. 4. cognitively-driven trust phenomenon, grounded in judgments of the trusteespredictability and reliability.Through repeated interactions, we reach awareness of shared values &personal goals.IBT: Identification-based TrustTrust that members can depend on one another, that all members willcontribute their share of the work, that the team will fairly distributeresources, and that the team will include and inform everyone through open,honest communication. High performing teams consciously establish andmaintain an environment of trust. Trust becomes a felt presence, anaccepted norm, and a foundation for all that the team does.Signs of Professional Trust1) Team members report confident expectationsabout each other’s behavior and intentions.2) Team members extend trust when others offerbasic support.3) Team members value and show appreciation foreveryone’s contributions to team’s effectiveness.4) Team members talk as openly with one anotherabout work-related failures, weaknesses andfears as about competencies, strengths, andachievements.Three Aspects of Professional Trust 1. Credibility 2. Support 3. Consistency Credibility COMPETENCE, BELIEVABILITY, INTEGRITY, CAPABILITYBuild credibility:
  5. 5. 1. Share information openly and broadly 2. Stay accessible and visible to each other 3. Engage hard questions; answer them where possible 4. Offer objective, candid insights about the organization or team Support RESPECT, CIVILITY, INTEREST, SELF-DISCLOSURE, INTIMACYShow support: 1. Recognize and appreciate each other 2. Exhibit sincere personal concern for each 3. other’s well-being 4. Maintain civil discourse and courteous 5. interactions Consistency RELIABILITY, DEPENDABILITY, ACCOUNTABILITY, CHARACTERDemonstrate consistency: 1. Follow through on promises and commitments 2. Preserve working agreements 3. Seek and offer feedback Trust is Growing When You Notice Two Kinds of Trust on TeamsTrusting – Team members assume each other’s competence, commitment, andpositive intentions. Perceptions of mutuality, dependency, and confidence.Trustworthiness – Team members’ actions are consistent, reliable, supportive,known, competent, and credible. Perceptions of respect, obligation, andresponsibility.“The best way to find out if you can trust someone is to trustthem.” Ernest Hemingway

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