QoS for Media Networks

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This presentation was given at the doctoral days at ENSIAS Morocco. The goal was to show how the innovation process goes and a particular example through what Cisco is doing for the media networks.

This presentation was given at the doctoral days at ENSIAS Morocco. The goal was to show how the innovation process goes and a particular example through what Cisco is doing for the media networks.

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  • So what is Cisco’s role? To help people and businesses and government succeed. To keep pace in a changing world and take advantage of evolving technology.As pioneers in the industry, we have a long history of “seeing around corners” to foresee market transitions. We do this by listening to customers. We don’t innovate for the sake of innovation—no matter how exciting an opportunity may seem.If it isn’t going to help solve a customer challenge—today or in the future—it’s not something we invest in. We put our customers’ needs first.Our goal is to recognize market transitions years before they occur—we aim for three to five years in advance of major transitions. We make this possible by being close to our customers—they lead our innovation.Because of this customer-driven approach, we’re able to capitalize on and shape transitions before they’re fully realized in the market. It’s our sustainable differentiation, and by the time our competitors recognize a transition, it’s too late for them to catch up.This is part of our culture, part of who we are—and a key differentiator in how we help our customers succeed. 
  • Transition from Medianet to General talk about video streaming. Use the reason that pushed Cisco to Create Medianet. Then move the Agenda.
  • End-to-end Solution optimized for rich mediaAchieved through interaction between video endpoints and network elementsSimplified Access to Integrated, Media-aware Services Deploying and Managing Multiple Types of Collaboration Applications Including Business-video over Same IP NetworkNetworks talk protocols, apps talk APIs, Medianet allows them to talk to each other
  • Feedback is used for adjusting the codec
  • As you’ve heard us discuss before, at Cisco we believe collaboration needs to be an holistic experience. That doesn’t mean that it’s exactly the same on each device, or from each location, or for each individual work style: but there are a fundamental set of capabilities that need to converge that allow us to make human connections over distance.And that is our mission: connecting people – not endpoint devices, those are just part of the equation.Collaboration is no longer just a voice call or just a video call or just a web conferencing session. These interactions need to be blended to allow people to work together in ways that are natural and intuitively easy to use. It’s about the *conversation*, where ideally the technology fades into the background when done right.From a technology point of view, it’s about a blend of software *and* hardware working together to deliver unparalleled experiences, using any media on any device from anywhere. And there is something about video that we think fundamentally changes the game. If you’ve ever sent an email that has been mis-interpreted – I think you know what I mean.Of course you know Cisco for the quality of the hardware we deliver – in today’s call we’re going to focus on recent *software* innovations that will power the next wave of video collaboration
  • Cisco has driven multiple waves of innovation in video:Wave 1: Video was deemed a viable communication tool and Cisco drove video usage over IP. Examples of how we did this include:We started by being the first to drive converged voice & data networkCreating a video phone for use over ISDN networks Making video as easy as a phone call - Adds video to conferences & calls using USB camera – 2004Enables 1st Service Provider to deliver Hosted TPUnified Call ControlCisco HCS and Integrated Cloud collaborationWave 2:Video becomes a form of collaboration and starts to be commonly seen in the business community. Today 75% of all fortune 100 companies are using Cisco video. Cisco helped drive it into the mainstream by:New Experience: Cisco redefines Video Market with TelePresence launch1st to scale: First to show customers how to deploy large scale H.323 video conferencing networks with dozens of gatekeepers in a global network and large scale E.164 dial plans. The Video Conferencing SRND written by Alan Glowacki was the first of its kind. At that time, PictureTel, VCON, Polycom, etc. were mostly doing IP address dialing and using phone books like the Polycom Global Address Book (GAB) server to mask the IP address so that users could click on a name instead of typing an IP address, but of course typing a name is still more difficult that typing a number, so helping customers deploy E.164 dial plans at that time was important.1st to help move any to any calling: Intercompany calling - first call we made between BT and Cisco via MSB SBC in GSR12K around 2005ish. Significance is that it is the first immersive 1080p video call between companies….Other: 1st Public TP Suites, Jabber, URI dialing, etc.Wave 3:We are moving toward making video integrated with business processes in order to drive it to be a more business critical application and be used by everyone in the organization every day. We see content and contextual integration as well as social integration as important in this third phase.Cisco has a good start on this with some significant 1sts:1st to Share Presentations1st to use 2 screens to show people/content1st to understand the value of video as content. 1st to offer speech analytics which makes searching by speaker or subject in the video easier.
  • We also believe that video collaboration is not just for the executive in the corner office: that it’s most effective when available to a broad range of workers – whether inside your organization or beyond company walls.Whether that’s for employees on the goOr the classic “infoworker” in the officeOr for executives Or for those without a desk such as in retail who might want to use a front-facing camera to show color and fabric to a designer; or perhaps a manufacturing shop floor worker looking to troubleshoot a production line stoppageAnd let’s not forget the contact center agent – who can now use video to create more of a personal connection with customersAt Cisco, we don’t optimize for just one of these work styles – we provide solutions that address them all: and that of course allow them to all work together, because that’s what these folks want to do during the course of business. Islands of video collaboration are not what most organizations want.
  • Here’s what this looks like: three easy steps to set up, join and participate from the device of your choice.What’s new is:The ease of scheduling of both TelePresence and WebEx resources The ability to start the meeting from anywhere – not just from within an immersive roomAnd two-way voice and content sharing
  • …Cisco addresses those concerns with our medianet architecture. With Cisco Medianet, customers can accelerate deployment of video and collaboration with confidence by providing exceptional transparency into video flows –using the intelligence in the network to identify and prioritize traffic appropriately; while at the same time protecting critical applications from being impacted by often unpredictable user-driven video demand.Here’s what’s new with medianet today:Support for new endpoints: Cisco is introducing support for more Cisco collaboration endpoints and infrastructure as part of its medianet architecture. In addition to TelePresence and Jabber endpoints, Cisco WebEx Meeting Center clients on Windows PCs are also medianet-enabled.Making the network smarter: Cisco medianet features will also now be enabled on the Cisco Catalyst® 6000 and the ASR 9000 series, with global availability targeted for March 2013. This advancement will make the core network smarter, and able to recognize all types of collaboration traffic down to the details of audio, data and video streams.The way in which administrators will be able to gain visibility into, troubleshoot and set policy for video collaboration on the network will be through an administrative console such as the Cisco Prime Collaboration Manager depicted bottom right.
  • The key factor in our ability to become a market leader in so many areas is our Comprehensive Architecture .We have the most comprehensive collaboration portfolio and flexible delivery model offerings in the market – all under one roof. A portfolio that is built on a Unified Architecture that leverages the power of the network and delivers a scalable, secure, and cloud-ready foundationEach of the announcements we’ve made today further contribute to our architectural approach (start from the bottom):The additions to medianet – with more endpoints and network equipment now actively participating to increase the visibility and control of video traffic for ITAugmentations to our partner offerings to be delivered from the cloudA healthy focus on the platform services provided within the infrastructure to optimize resources and lower costsAll of which contribute to new end-user experiences across the endpoints and devices running TelePresence and WebEx – bringing millions of people together across organizational boundariesIt is both the breadth and depth of this comprehensive approach that we believe contributes significantly to our differentiation in the marketplace. 
  • As people, we have a long history of making connections. From our first wired communications with telegraphs 170 years ago to the early emergence of the Internet.In the beginning, advancements occurred slowly. Today, though, innovation is happening at a remarkable rate.Estimates show that 5 exabytes of information were created between the dawn of civilization and 2002. Now, that much information is created every two days—and the pace is increasing.The type of data is also changing as we’re seeing more and more video content each year. In fact, two-thirds of all traffic will be video by 2015. It’s creating so much traffic that we’ll see the global cloud market grow 500% by 2020. And, in 2020, we anticipate that 4.5 billion new people will connect with 37 billion new devices also connecting.Everyone will be impacted by these changes—your business, your employees, the entire world.At the heart of it all is Cisco’s intelligent network. We have a long history of finding new ways to communicate and collaborate. And all of our work and foresight has brought us exactly where we are today—entering the next phase of the Internet, the Internet of Everything.
  • It’s in the phase of the Internet of Everything that we connect more than just things and data. We also connect people and processes like never before. But let’s step back for a moment to talk about what’s led us to this point.The Internet can be seen in four distinct waves, each phase having a more profound effect on business and society.The first phase—about 20 years ago—was Connectivity. This is when getting connected online felt like a miracle. During this “fixed” computing stage, you had to go to the device to connect, your connection speed was limited, and content was just beginning to populate the “Net.” Still, it was an exciting time.Then, in the Networked Economy, we saw the birth of eCommerce and digitally connected supply chains. It changed the way we shopped—and how companies reached new markets.We’re currently in the Immersive Experiences phase, which is dominated by social media, collaboration, and widespread mobility on a variety of devices. This is completely transforming the world of work. At the same time, we’re entering the Internet of Everything. This phase brings together people, process, data, and things, turning information into actions that create new capabilities, richer experiences, and unprecedented economic opportunities for businesses, individuals, and countries.And this isn’t new to Cisco. We’ve been incubating this concept for more than five years—first with Smart + Connected Communities, then Smart Grid, then Connected Industries.
  • So how has our Build, Buy, and Partnership model performed? As you can see, in most cases we’re either No. 1 or No. 2.And you’ll notice we have a diverse product portfolio from collaboration to data center to cloud to security to Unified Computing. And this touches on just a few of our product categories—all of which we deliver as integrated architectures, enhancing the long-term stability of deployed solutions.We also offer a range of services, covering these areas and more. Plus a ecosystem of advanced services and technical services. We also touch the enterprise, service provider, and public sector.Plus, our unmatched expertise in networking technology transitions makes us uniquely positioned to help customers capture the value of the Internet of Everything.Our ability to build, manage, and secure end-to-end IP-based platforms for people, process, data, and things will fuel the growth of the Internet of Everything.And only Cisco connects the unconnected with an open standard, integrated architecture from the cloud to end devices.Based on our rich history—and success in the market—connecting the previously unconnected is what we do best. And we will continue to strive to be No. 1 in all of our markets.
  • One of the ways we enable our strategy is through our foundational priorities, which are at the center of change—touching all aspects of our connected world and creating unprecedented opportunity.To achieve this, we focus on five foundational priorities—the building blocks of our strategy. In each area, we understand the business imperatives of our customers. This includes our customers across segments, including Service Provider, Enterprise, and Public Sector companies.  Our five priorities include our continuing leadership in the core, providing market leading technology in data center and virtualization, supporting the massive increase in video, enabling collaboration to improve workforce productivity and innovation, and building architectures for business transformation. At the center of our priorities and fueling their growth, is our intelligent network—the framework you need to run your existing business and help you position for future transformation. Our unique value is how we integrate our solutions and services through the intelligent network. We understand it’s the possibilities, enabled by the network, that shape new markets, new business models, and new experiences. And we’re also committed to delivering an intelligent network built on integrated products, services, and software platforms.

Transcript

  • 1. Cisco Confidential 1© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Amine Choukir, Abderrahim Maroufi June 2013
  • 2. © 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 2 •  Cisco & Innovation •  Medianet: Architecture for pervasive media experience •  Problem Statement •  Today (What are we executing on) •  Tomorrow •  Academia •  Prototype •  Product status •  Conclusion
  • 3. © 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 4 Worldwide leader in networking that transforms how people connect, communicate and collaborate 70,000 partners 90% of world’s internet data travels on Cisco gear 63,000+ employees 470+ offices $40+ Billion sales 165+ countries 12,000 patents 22,000 CCIE’s $5.8 Billion Annual R&D budget
  • 4. © 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 5
  • 5. © 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 6 Innovation Customer Driven Market Transitions
  • 6. © 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 7 2.5% 13.5% 34% 34% 16% Area under the curve is number of customers
  • 7. © 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 8
  • 8. © 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 9 R&D: $ 5-ish B 24,000 employees Partner w/ Other Companies Microsoft, SAP, Citrix VMWare, PacketAction … Design New Products CRS-1, IOS XR, Nexus, UCS Spin in Investments Andiamo Nuova Impresa Pursue Acquisitions 180+ Acquisitions Start New Business Models WebEX Cloud Wireless for SMB Wireless SP wholesale Develop New Technology TelePresence, IP Telephony Converged Wireline/Wireless Medianet Cisco ONE
  • 9. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 10 •  Cisco & Innovation •  Medianet: Architecture for pervasive media experience •  Problem Statement •  Today (What are we executing on) •  Tomorrow •  Academia •  Prototype •  Product status •  Conclusion
  • 10. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 11 CAGR: Compound Annual Growth Rate
  • 11. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 12 Coding Transmission Decode
  • 12. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 13 15 fps 30 fps I Frame 1024–1518 Bytes I Frame 1024–1518 Bytes P and B Frames 128–256 Bytes 600 Kbps 32 Kbps Variability of Video Coders I Frame Complete Frame Encoded P Frame Ball Encoded with Motion Vector from I frame B Frame Only Motion Encoded Ball Bi-directionally from I & P
  • 13. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 14 •  A compressed video is a series of bytes, so the first step is to split it into packets. •  A video stream is then often coupled with audio that has to be synchronized (and sometimes subtitles and other info are added). •  Typical streaming techniques are: IP/UDP/TS IP/UDP/RTP IP/UDP/SRTP IP/UDP/TS/RTP •  But you can come across something like that: IP/TCP/RTP IP/TCP/HTTPS/RTP… •  Recently ABR is getting traction (http) •  NAT, buffering, real-time vs. recorded
  • 14. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 15 Traffic Profiles and Requirements Voice §  Smooth §  Benign §  Drop sensitive §  Delay sensitive §  UDP priority Video-Conf §  Bursty §  Greedy §  Drop sensitive §  Delay sensitive §  UDP priority Surveillance §  Bursty §  Drop sensitive §  Delay sensitive §  Jitter sensitive Media Streaming §  Bursty §  Drop sensitive §  Delay and Jitter insensitive Data §  Smooth/bursty §  Benign/greedy §  Drop insensitive §  Delay insensitive §  TCP retransmits TelePresence §  Bursty §  Drop sensitive §  Delay sensitive §  Jitter sensitive §  UDP priority
  • 15. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 16 •  Massive (exclusive) use of IP protocol also for voice and video! •  IP was not designed for multimedia •  Examples of challenges and real problems for multimedia networks: IPTV §  Audio/Video sync (lip sync) §  Channel change time §  Latency §  Scale Enterprise networks §  Quality of Service §  Bandwidth Reservation §  Authentication §  Security
  • 16. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 17 •  Cisco & Innovation •  Medianet: Architecture for pervasive media experience •  Problem Statement •  Today (What are we executing on) •  Tomorrow •  Academia •  Prototype •  Product status •  Conclusion
  • 17. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 18 •  Service quality •  Ability to provide different priorities to different applications, users, or data flows •  Guarantee a certain level of performance to a data flow. E.g. bit rate, delay, jitter… •  QoS refers to the capability of a network to provide better service to selected network traffic Resource Reservation DSCP Control over resources Access Control QoE Most of the rest of the talk will focus on solutions for improved QoS on media networks
  • 18. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 19 Video Solutions Optimize User Experience Video Monitoring Media Optimization Media Aware Routing Auto-configuration Enable Video Solutions Video Demand Acceleration § Collaboration, security, information § Any device, anywhere § Optimized experience IT Efficiency § Multiple applications § Network optimization § Resource control § Visibility and management Medianet Service Interface APIs
  • 19. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 20 Identify Media Classify Schedule Provision/ Resource Control Monitor, Troubleshoot, Optimize Network Management WAN Flow metadata Media Monitoring EF AF41 Current Medianet Features
  • 20. Metadata
  • 21. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 22 •  Metadata is set of attributes, describes the properties of traffic flow. Example: application identification (e.g. the flow is a webex-meeting stream) codec information (e.g. the flow is an RTP video with 90KHz clock frequency) •  Metadata can be produced by: Application Network Proxies •  Once produced, Metadata is transported via flow path towards destination •  Metadata is then consumed by various services in the network.
  • 22. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 23 1. Operator configures QoS policy on router Define a traffic class “telepresence” (class-­‐map with match  applica,on  telepresence)   Configure preferential treatment for this class (policy-­‐map  with DSCP setting or queuing) 2. Application signals metadata through MSI [flow = <e1,p1,e2,p2,  udp> , application-name = ”telepresence”] 3. Metadata arrives at the router Program the data plane: flow <e1,p1,e2,p2,  udp> is telepresence class 4. Application starts sending media traffic Media flow receives preferential treatment at the router 1. 2. 3. 4.
  • 23. Media Monitoring
  • 24. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 25 •  Hard to pinpoint root cause •  What path? •  Quantify quality (what is good/bad video quality?) Quality Issues: Resolution Artifacts Frozen Frame … CTMS ISP B ISP A Firewall Router Router L3Switch Router Router L3Switch L2Switch L3Switch L3Switch Router Router L2Switch WAAS L3Switch
  • 25. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 26 CTMS ISP B ISP A Firewall Router Router L3Switch Router Router L3Switch L2Switch L3Switch L3Switch Router Router L2Switch WAAS L3Switch §  For TCP, RTP provides: Fault-isolation, problem ownership assignment Accelerated troubleshooting SLA validation §  Identifies and measures user traffic on routers, switches and endpoints network contribution (loss, jitter) to media stream Applied on interface: inbound and/or outbound
  • 26. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 27 Media Flow Mediatrace Initiator & local Responder Mediatrace Responder Mediatrace Responder Mediatrace Responder PM PM PM PM 1. Configure 2. Pull 3. Clean-up 4. Teardown
  • 27. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 28 •  Cisco & Innovation •  Medianet: Architecture for pervasive media experience •  Problem Statement •  Today (What are we executing on) •  Tomorrow •  Academia •  Prototype •  Product status •  Conclusion
  • 28. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 29 •  Main Goal: Improve QoE of media delivery •  Initial focus: Multiparty video conference (more later) •  Map Network Metric to QoE •  Inference and resource estimation Effective use of feedback from network (PerfMon, Mediatrace) •  Multipath streaming Based on network feedback, choose the appropriate path for media (Metadata) Other forms of coding (e.g., SVC) to be considered •  Network processing Network nodes can help coders (typically at endpoint) with basic tasks E.g., combining flows (network coding)
  • 29. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 30 Preliminary ideas: •  Switching is more scalable, but how to adjust the sending rates? •  Several “helpers”, not only one server. Interesting problem: how are packets relayed •  SVC relevant for switching. Metadata can save effort at measuring. PfR could help, e.g., to relay traffic among helpers •  Can helpers do network coding? •  How can network feedback (Perfmon, MT) be used here? Conference Server <active speaker> Conference Server <active speaker> Transcoding Switching
  • 30. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 31 Sending Rate Congestion Feedback
  • 31. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 32 •  Cisco & Innovation •  Medianet: Architecture for pervasive media experience •  Problem Statement •  Today (What are we executing on) •  Tomorrow •  Academia •  Prototype •  Product status •  Conclusion
  • 32. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 33 •  Android •  ABR streaming (http streaming) •  WebRTC
  • 33. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 34 What are your ideas?
  • 34. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 35 •  Medianet: www.cisco.com/go/medianet •  IoE: http://www.cisco.com/web/tomorrow-starts-here/index.html •  Videos: http://youtu.be/nWqzn2Eri7U http://youtu.be/TcDkDoQSrVA http://youtu.be/5FSmkKXNxq8 http://youtu.be/BJSjbttGaVM
  • 35. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 36 •  Cisco & Innovation •  Medianet: Architecture for pervasive media experience •  Problem Statement •  Today (What are we executing on) •  Tomorrow •  Academia •  Prototype •  Product status •  Conclusion
  • 36. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 37 COLLABORATION •  Connect people not endpoints •  Conversations not calls •  Familiar, intuitive, natural •  Seamless software & hardware integration •  Any media, any device to anyone at any time
  • 37. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 38 Wave 2: COLLABORATION Wave 3: BUSINESS INTEGRATION Wave 1: COMMUNICATION VIDEO INTEGRATED INTO THE WAY WE WORK Video A Business Critical Application Video Over IP Networks Moving Video to Mainstream
  • 38. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 39 Mobile Executive Contact Center Desk-lessInfoWorker Cisco Unified Communications ManagerCOLLABORATION
  • 39. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 40 SCHEDULE Voice, Video and Content From within Email Click to Join, One Button to Push LAUNCH MEET End-to-End Security 1 2 3 Ease of Scheduling Launch from Anywhere Two-way video and content
  • 40. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 41 •  Automatically identifies, prioritizes and protects •  Vastly expanded portfolio of supported endpoints •  New metadata and media monitoring capabilities •  Now supported in flagship switching and routing platforms •  Using network intelligence to put a “crystal ball” for video in the hands of IT managers globally Available Q1 CY13
  • 41. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 42 Medianet Environments End User Business and CustomerIT Administrator Platform Services Activity Stream and Social Graph Content Management IM and Presence Directory and Identity Scheduling and Calendaring Voice and Video Delivery Model Cisco HostedOn Premises Partner Hosted Experience
  • 42. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 43 •  Cisco & Innovation •  Medianet: Architecture for pervasive media experience •  Problem Statement •  Today (What are we executing on) •  Tomorrow •  Academia •  Prototype •  Product status •  Conclusion
  • 43. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 44
  • 44. Thank you.
  • 45. C97-666590-00 © 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 4646
  • 46. C97-666590-00 © 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 47 1995 First Office in Switzerland 2009 First Server Shipped 1993 First Acquisition Crescendo 2006 TelePresence Launched 1999 First IP Phone 150+ Since 2010 ‘Cool IT’ ranking Top 3 2011/12 Cisco Switzerland Ranked #1 2007 WebEx Acquisition 2002 Andiamo Acquisition – developer of intelligent storage, switching products 2003 Acquisition 2012 Swisscom sustainability award to Cisco Acquisitions over 19 years 1984 Company Founded 1984 1993 1995 1999 2002 2003 2006 2007 2009 2010 2012
  • 47. © 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 48 170 Years Ago: Invention of the Telegraph 100 Years Ago: Invention of the Radio 70 Years Ago: First general purpose electronic computer 40 Years Ago: First Internet connection 20 Years Ago: World Wide Web TodayIntelligently Connecting People, Process, Data, and Things 2003: 0.5B Connected Devices 2005: IP Traffic: 29 exabytes 2005: First Smartphone 2008: Video Traffic: 21 exabytes 2010: 7B Connected Devices 2010: 0.5B Smartphones 2012: 50M Connected Ca 2011: 90M Smartmeters
  • 48. © 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 49 Internet of Everything Digitize the World Connecting: •  People •  Process •  Data •  Things Intelligent Connections Connectivity Digitize Access to Information •  Email •  Web Browser •  Search Immersive Experiences Digitize Interactions (Business & Social) •  Social •  Mobility •  Cloud •  Video Networked Economy Digitize Business Process •  E-commerce •  Digital Supply Chain •  Collaboration Business and Societal Impact
  • 49. © 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 50 Our Focus on Integration Provides our Customers with a Competitive Advantage Our Diverse Product Portfolio Means We’re Here for the Long-Term Breadth and Depth of Technology Portfolio 62% #1 Routing: Edge/Core/Access 50% #1 TelePresence 55% #1 Wireless LAN 68% #1 Switching: Modular/Fixed 40% #1 Voice 41% #1 Web Conferencing 17% #3 x86 Blade Servers 44% #2 Storage: Area Networks 32% #1 Security
  • 50. © 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 51 Mobile | Social | Visual | Virtual Video Collaboration Data Center/ Virtualization/ Cloud Architectures for Business Transformation Intelligent Network •  Routing •  Switching •  Services Leadership in the Core… Strategic Building Blocks Mobility | Security | Any to Any
  • 51. © 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 52 Find Filter Business Unit Formed Graduate Eliminate Accelerate Ideas Incubate Initiate Customers New Customers Employees Corporate All Business Functions Fixed time Startup-like team Adoption focus Market focus Structured BU Idea è Prototype Market trial Incubate/Initiate Accelerated path
  • 52. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 53 REVENUEGROWTH TIME INCUBATE/INITIATE GROWTH MATURITY Patents, Pre-standard Standardization groups Round A/B funding Standardization Competitive position Best practice Testimonials Customers or Industry requirements Demo, Prototype Market share Vertical market solutions Cust Sat (quality) Market share Churn/Roadmap Cust Sat (quality) Service attach rate Differentiated margins Growth (units & revenue) Standard margins Top/Bottom line Standard margins Top/Bottom line Cost optimization Next business?
  • 53. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 54 Encoder Packetiser Encoder Packetiser Video Audio M U L T I P LE XE R Transport Stream PES PES ES MPEG Compression Layer MPEG Systems Layer+ DVB/ATSC Programme Specific Information(PSI) or Service Information (SI) M O D U L A T O R DVB ATSC Data ES Timing DTS/ PTS System Time Clock (STC) PacketiserData PES Packetiser PES ? An example for TS streaming
  • 54. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 55 *Note: Latency Here Is Referring to Network Latency Traffic Profiles and Requirements •  Latency ≤ 150 ms •  Jitter ≤ 30 ms •  Loss ≤ 1% One-Way Requirements Voice Bandwidth per Call Depends on Codec, Sampling-Rate, and Layer 2 Media Video-Conf §  Latency ≤ 150 ms §  Jitter ≤ 30 ms §  Loss ≤ 1% One-Way Requirements IP/VC Has the Same Requirements as VoIP, but Has Radically Different Traffic Patterns (BW Varies Greatly) Data Data Classes: Mission-Critical Apps Transactional/Interactive Apps Bulk Data Apps Best Effort Apps (Default) Traffic Patterns for Data Vary Among Applications TelePresence Telepresence bandwidth varies based on the resolutions and has Radically Different Traffic Patterns §  Latency* ≤ 200ms §  Jitter ≤ 10 ms §  Loss ≤ 0.05% §  Bandwidth (5 Mbps per screen @1080P) One-Way Requirements §  Smooth §  Benign §  Drop sensitive §  Delay sensitive §  UDP priority §  Bursty §  Greedy §  Drop sensitive §  Delay sensitive §  UDP priority §  Smooth/bursty §  Benign/greedy §  Drop insensitive §  Delay insensitive §  TCP retransmits §  Bursty §  Drop sensitive §  Delay sensitive §  Jitter sensitive §  UDP priority
  • 55. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 56 Traffic Profiles and Requirements •  Streaming  with  some  additional  needs   •  Camera  feed  is  approx  1  –  3Mbps  (UDP)   •  Uni-­‐cast    or,  optionally,  multi-­‐cast   •  Storage  uses  iSCSI  (TCP)   •  Total  Bandwidth  depends  on  simultaneous  viewings   •  Latency*  ≤  150ms;    Jitter  ≤  10  ms;    Loss  ≤  0.05%   •  Bandwidth  (200K  bps  to  3.5M  bps)   One-­‐Way  Requirements   •  TrafHic  patterns  could  be  engineered   •  Uni-­‐cast    or,  optionally,  multi-­‐cast   •  Could  leverage  content  networking   •  Total  Bandwidth  depends  on  simultaneous  viewings   •  Latency.  No  real  constraints  could  impact  experience  (i.e.  channel  change)   •  Jitter  ≤  1s  (player  will  leverage  buffering);    Loss  ≤  0.05%  (for  HD);    Bandwidth  (250Kbps   to  4M  bps)   One-­‐Way  Requirements   Surveillance §  Bursty §  Drop sensitive §  Delay sensitive §  Jitter sensitive Media Streaming §  Bursty §  Drop sensitive §  Delay and Jitter insensitive
  • 56. Cisco Confidential© 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 57 Performance Routing High Packet Loss over this link, let’s see if I can find a better path
  • 57. Cisco Confidential© 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 58 Performance Routing Let’s move Telepresence Traffic to other link
  • 58. © 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 59