Twitter for Events - amiando Social Media Study
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Twitter for Events - amiando Social Media Study

  • 817 views
Uploaded on

With the knowledge of more than 100,000 events worldwide that use amiando.com for online event registration, ticketing and Social Media marketing we thought it was about time to dig deeper into how......

With the knowledge of more than 100,000 events worldwide that use amiando.com for online event registration, ticketing and Social Media marketing we thought it was about time to dig deeper into how social media is being used around events. The following study focuses on the actual use of Twitter and gives recommendations on how you can apply the findings to make your event a success.

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
817
On Slideshare
814
From Embeds
3
Number of Embeds
3

Actions

Shares
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 3

http://www.linkedin.com 1
http://pinterest.com 1
https://twitter.com 1

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Social Media: How To Get The Most Out Of Twitter To Make Your Event A Success.amiando.com - September 2010
  • 2. amiando.com – online event registration & ticketingTable of ContentsExecutive Summary ................................................................................................................................. 2Why You Should Observe Your Audience ................................................................................................ 3The Data Source: Twitter and Ten Events ................................................................................................ 3 Twitter ................................................................................................................................................. 3 The Events ........................................................................................................................................... 3Analysis .................................................................................................................................................... 6 What We Wanted to Find Out ............................................................................................................. 6 General Statistics ................................................................................................................................. 6 Twitter Behavior at Events................................................................................................................... 7 Social Media and the Event Lifecycle .................................................................................................. 9 Social Media Power Users ................................................................................................................. 13A Last Word: Applying these Findings to Other Social Media ............................................................... 14The Authors ........................................................................................................................................... 15About amiando – event registration & ticketing ................................................................................... 15Social Media: How To Get The Most Out Of Twitter To Make Your Event A Success 1
  • 3. amiando.com – online event registration & ticketingExecutive SummaryWith the knowledge of more than 100,000 events worldwide that use amiando.com foronline event registration, ticketing and Social Media marketing we thought it was abouttime to dig deeper into how social media is being used around events. The following studyfocuses on the actual use of Twitter and gives recommendations on how you can apply thefindings to make your event a success.The most important findings are: 1. Twitter Behavior at Events The activity level of Twitter usage does not depend on the size of the event. The ratio of users who tweet about the event to event participants ranges from ten percent (i.e. every tenth person at the event posts about the event) up to 800% (i.e. eight times as many people tweet about the event as there are participants). 2. Social Media and the Event Lifecycle 60% of all Social Media communication takes place while the event is being held. The remaining 40% split evenly before and after the event – whereby a second spike occurs a few days after the event. Over the various phases of the event lifecycle the quality of the tweets changes. 3. Social Media Power Users Like in most media also on Twitter there are power users that account for a large share of all tweets about the event: 35% of the users posted 80% of the Twitter content.Read more about these findings in the study and find out how you can use these results toget the most out of Social Media for your event.Social Media: How To Get The Most Out Of Twitter To Make Your Event A Success 2
  • 4. amiando.com – online event registration & ticketingWhy You Should Observe Your AudienceDid you ever wonder how attendees behave and what they are thinking before, during, andafter your event? Todays Social Media tools allow you to find out exactly that while gettingvaluable feedback from the people you care most about, your customers.“Social Media is, at its most basic sense, a shift in how people discover, read, and sharenews and information and content. It is a fusion of sociology and technology, transformingmonologue (one to many) into dialog (many to many).” Brian Solis1 definition points outthe dialog that is enabled by the variety of communication channels available to usersthrough Social Media. For the first time, conversation between consumer and provider ispossible – and this conversation can be systematically evaluated.For this study, we chose the field of events. In particular we focused on the conversationof event attendees on Twitter, which we considered as the medium which offers thehighest and most dynamic level of activity needed for such an endeavor. The followingstudy presents an analysis on participant feedback and takes a look at variations over tenevents. The aim is to draw conclusions from the behavior of attendees of events over themedium Twitter. We then want to provide future event organizers with a reference so thatthey can evaluate themselves.The Data Source: Twitter and Ten EventsTwitterTo collect data for our analysis we chose the micro blogging site Twitter. First of all, thereare many tools to easily draw data about specific events from Twitter. In this case here weused the program the Archivist2. With this application we were able to get a more or lesscomplete record of the discussion about special topics and events. Another reason whyTwitter seems to be a suitable channel to use for a study like this is the fact that activeTwitter users are so-called power users, up to date with the new technologies, and notafraid to experiment and share their ideas which means that feedback given by them ismostly on a qualitatively high level. Further, those people are able to think in 140characters, i.e. they provide information with maximum content at minimum length.The EventsIt was first of all crucial that the events we wanted to observe are well-known andimportant, with topics focusing on the web, Social Media or internet technologies. Theseevents were likely to host many active Twitter users whose activity could be observed and1 Thought leader and author in new media.2 The Archivist can be downloaded for free from http://visitmix.com/labs/archivist-desktop/.Social Media: How To Get The Most Out Of Twitter To Make Your Event A Success 3
  • 5. amiando.com – online event registration & ticketinglater be analyzed. Further, we considered it important to choose an international set ofevents from Europe, USA and Asia. Some events used amiando (http://www.amiando.com)for event registration and ticketing, but this did not play a key role in their selection. Datawas collected from April to May 2010.In the following short summaries of the 10 analyzed events are presented (in chronologicalorder).Web 2.0 Expo 2010 (Web 2.0 Expo), San Francisco, USAWeb 2.0 Expo showcases the latest Web 2.0 business models, development paradigms anddesign strategies. The attendees are next-generation web builders.MarketingProfs B2B Forum (MarketingProfs), Boston, USAThe MarketingProfs B2B Forum has a broad-based B2B marketing educational program witha special focus on integration of Social Media and search engine optimization. Theconference is for businesses who want to learn how to properly incorporate theseprocedures into their strategy to improve sales results.Frozen Rails, Helsinki, FinlandFrozen Rails is a top-class Ruby on Rails3 conference. The program of Frozen Rails includespresentations from internationally renowned speakers from the USA, Finland, and the restof Europe. The organizers of Frozen Rails have a passion for Rails and for open source ingeneral.Green Venture Summit 20 10 (GVS), Berlin, GermanyThe Green Venture Summit 2010 is a new, international Cleantech conference, with topicsfrom areas such as renewable energy, solar, wind, energy storage, energy efficiency, smartgrid, smart home, green architecture, green agriculture, water and green management.The conference is targeted at startups, investors, thought leaders and successful ventures.Next 10 (Next), Berlin, GermanyThe Next 10 conference is one of the most important networking and trend conferenceswithin the European web industry. It is the only conference that unites the Internetcommunity with various brands and leading companies.Art Directors Club Summit (ADC), Frankfurt, GermanyThe ADC is considered to be the biggest meeting of the creative industry in the Germanspeaking area. The ADC is divided into multiple sections: ADC Competition, ADC Expo, ADCCongress, ADC Awards Show and ADC Junior Days.3 Ruby on Rails is an open source web development framework for the Ruby programming language.Social Media: How To Get The Most Out Of Twitter To Make Your Event A Success 4
  • 6. amiando.com – online event registration & ticketingSWITCH Conference (Switch), Coimbra, PortugalThe aim of the Switch Conference is to get attendees together with scientists,entrepreneurs, thinkers, doers and everyone in between to share their knowledge, theirexperiences and their ideas to create awareness on scientific and technological matters.TEDxTokyo, Tokyo, JapanThe goal of this conference is to spark deep discussions and connections in groups bothintimate and expansive. TEDxTokyo combines live speakers and TEDTalks videos from themain TED conference. The intention is to help shape a sustainable future for Japan and therest of the world.Future of Web Design (FOWD), London, UKThe web design industrys leading and most inspirational conference puts the design backin web design. FOWD offers sessions on the entire design process – ranging from inspirationto build to project management.Gilbane Conference (Gilbane SF), San Francisco, USAThe Gilbane Conference is focused on global, enterprise, and web content managementtechnologies, enterprise search, text analytics and semantic technologies, collaboration &enterprise Social Media, XML and publishing technologies.Social Media: How To Get The Most Out Of Twitter To Make Your Event A Success 5
  • 7. amiando.com – online event registration & ticketingAnalysisWhat We Wanted to Find OutIn the following study, three main questions are addressed:1. Twitter behavior at events: First of all, we want to look at the behavior of eventattendees on Twitter. We want to know how many active Twitter users there are and whattheir level of activity is, i.e. how many messages related to a specific conference theywrite. Thereby we can get a general idea of the Twitter usage at events.2. Social Media and the event lifecycle: The second point of interest is the Twitter usageover the event lifecycle. In this step we want to look at the main topics discussed overtime in the Twitter community. The goal is here to find a pattern over time in order togive recommendations on what activity and content to focus on over the event lifecycle.3. The most active Social Media users: The last question is about the group of activeTwitter users who write about the events. We want to look at the level of activity ofindividual users. Thus we can find out if there are user groups to focus on when planning aSocial Media campaign or strategy.General StatisticsDuring the whole period we collected 31,442 tweets posted by 9,736 active Twitter usersat ten events. This makes an average number of 3.2 tweets per person – whereby themajority of active Twitter users only posted one tweet (see detailed analysis below). Theevents ranged from about 200 to several thousand participants and lasted 2.5 days onaverage. Number of tweets 31,442 Average number of 3.2 tweets per user Average number of 3,144 tweets per event Table 1: Descriptive statistics.Social Media: How To Get The Most Out Of Twitter To Make Your Event A Success 6
  • 8. amiando.com – online event registration & ticketingTwitter Behavior at EventsIn the following we want to look at the distribution of active Twitter users and tweets perevent compared to the number of attendees.Our tests showed that neither the number of tweets nor of active Twitter users per eventseems related to the number of visitors.Instead we found another interesting phenomenon which is depicted in Figure 1: the ratioof active Twitter users versus the number of attendees reveals a wide range: at mostevents this ratio is smaller than one, i.e. there are less people who tweet about the eventthan attendees. But, surprisingly, some conferences have two to eight times more peoplewho tweet about the event than attend it. Most Events Have Less Active Twitter User Than Attendees 2 Ball size represents 1 number of events 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Active-Twitter-users/attendees ratio Source: amiando.com , 2010Figure 1: Ratio of active Twitter users vs. attendees.The explanation for this is that most (especially smaller) events are discussed in a certaincommunity or interest group around it. This group naturally does not only consist of thefew people that attend the conference. So people talk about the topics of the conferenceand mention the event despite they never attended it. For example at the MarketingProfsevent there are two times more people tweeting about it than attendees. A lot ofindividuals who have not attended the conference have tweeted about it. They retweetedfor example interesting findings of the panels, used the conference as a vehicle for notdirectly related information or just communicated within their peer group that they wouldnot attend the conference.Social Media: How To Get The Most Out Of Twitter To Make Your Event A Success 7
  • 9. amiando.com – online event registration & ticketingAnother example for this is the TEDxTokyo conference. Over eight times more activeTwitter users talked about the event than physically participated. What is special aboutTEDxTokyo is that the conference was streamed live online so people could follow it fromhome. Only a selected set of people was invited to the live event. So here it is self-explaining, why the ratio between attendees and active Twitter users is so high – a lot ofpeople watched it online and talked about it as if they were there. How to Use This for Your EventIt is not about size but about content. The size of an event is not an indicator for Twitteractivity, but the provision of content is. If you want your attendees to tweet about yourconference, you have to offer them opportunities, i.e. material that they want to spread.One possibility here is to publish data online. Another means to provide additional contenton your event is to make selected speeches available online, either live or via download onyour site. Thus you reach a broader audience and thus more people talk about your eventor share it - but be aware that your event becomes less exclusive to the visitors, in theworst case they would rather attend online than come to your conference. You have tomake sure that the conference is still worth visiting.Finally, you can also animate your participants to tweet about your event by e.g.organizing raffles or other games for your active Twitter users. It is on you to providematerial for Twitter activity.Think of the community around your event. Especially if your event is very smallcompared to the interest group around its topic, you have to take into consideration thepeople who do not attend your event but follow it on Twitter. In the first place they readwhat your participants present. The recommendation here is to monitor what theattendees tweet and then to react on it. For example you can retweet especially goodfeedback and citations from speeches or you can provide information you do not want tohold back from your online audience. The latter might also be your future customer, somake sure you take care of negative feedback and show presence on Twitter or otherrelevant channels.Social Media: How To Get The Most Out Of Twitter To Make Your Event A Success 8
  • 10. amiando.com – online event registration & ticketingSocial Media and the Event LifecycleTo find out how active Twitter users behave over the lifecycle of an event, we assessedthe distribution of the tweets over time. As can be seen in Figure 2 most tweets are postedduring the event. A closer look at the skewness of the graph indicates a differencebetween the share of tweets before and after the event. Twitter Usage Peaks at the Event Cumulative number of tweets 9000 8000 7000 6000 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0 Number of days before and after the event Source: amiando.com, 2010Figure 2: Cumulative distribution of tweets before, during and after the event.This becomes even clearer in Figure 3. TEDxTokyo, as well as a lot of other events, shows asecond, smaller peak about four days after the event. This second peak is caused by thepublication of event content, e.g. video recordings, a few days after the event. There Seem To Be Slightly More Tweets After the Event 1800 1600 1400 Number of tweets 1200 1000 800 600 400 200 0 Number of days before and after the event ADC GVS Frozenrails Gilbanes Switch Next MarketingProfs TEDx FOWD Source: amiando.com, 2010Figure 3: Distribution of tweets before, during and after the event.Social Media: How To Get The Most Out Of Twitter To Make Your Event A Success 9
  • 11. amiando.com – online event registration & ticketingA more detailed analysis (Figure 4) reveals that the difference between the number oftweets before and after the event is minor. With more than half of the tweets, i.e. 60%,the main conversation takes place during the event; the activity after the event is moreintensive by only a slight trend of four percent. To assess the tweets over time in moredetail, it is of interest, what quality the tweets are, i.e. what the attendees talk about intheir posts. The Majority of All Tweets Is Posted During the Event Tweets after Tweets before event event 22% 18% Tweets during event 60% Source: amiando.com, 2010Figure 4: Percentage of tweets before, during and after the event.For this analysis a significant sample of tweets was randomly selected and each of themwas read and categorized. Three categories were established, “positive”, “negative” and“neutral”. This categorization scheme gives a rough idea about the content of the tweets.Negative means that active Twitter users wrote something negative about the event, forexample that they were not content with the speaker or with the organization. A positivecomment meant that they appreciated something related to the event, for example theywrote something positive about the content of a presentation or speaker. Tweets aboutsomething else, for example information or off-topic questions were placed in the neutralcategory.Social Media: How To Get The Most Out Of Twitter To Make Your Event A Success 10
  • 12. amiando.com – online event registration & ticketing Most Tweets Are Neutral positive; 8.45% negative; 0.35% neutral; 91.20% Source: amiando.com , 2010Figure 5: Classification of tweets.As shown in Figure 5, most tweets were neutral. They represented 91.2% of the totalnumber of tweets. 8.45% of tweets were positive, while the percentage of negative tweetswas practically negligible, representing only 0.35%.Here is a wrap-up what the dominant topics before, during and after the event were:Before the event  Who is attending  Carpool organization  Advertisements of the organizers, hotels  What session to attend  Announcements of speakers  Program information, latest news by organizersDuring the event  Information sharing  Citations of speakers  Last-minute advertisements of the organizers, speakers, exhibitors  Private conversations  Comments on the conference and related occurrencesAfter the event  (positive) Feedback on the event  Take-aways from the event  Topic related things  Links on material from the eventTable 2: Content of tweets.Social Media: How To Get The Most Out Of Twitter To Make Your Event A Success 11
  • 13. amiando.com – online event registration & ticketingThe event-lifecycle analysis combined with a qualitative assessment of the tweets providesa good basis for interpretation. We have seen that most of the tweets were neutral. This isconfirmed by the wrap-up of the dominant topics listed in Table 2: Most of the topics arenot direct feedback on the event or organization. The tweets rather contain information orcitations that are shared, communicative messages or advertisements before and at theevent. This shows that Twitter is primarily used as an informative channel, most messagescontain conference or topic related information and links - especially after the event.Twitter is rarely used as a feedback channel, but if so, then mainly positive feedback isshared. The interpretation for this can also be found in nature of Twitter as an informationchannel. Most of the positive feedback is posted together with a link or a source.Therefore, readers are able to follow the positive opinion of the author. Some positivefeedback also contains hints or recommendations directed at the reader - as if the purposewas to teach something. Negative feedback, for example on the organization, seems to beharder to understand for the readers. How to Use This for Your EventPay special attention to Twitter activity during the event. During the event, activeTwitter users post a lot of information, either on the conference or directly on thespeeches. From these posts valuable learnings can be drawn, for example what are the hottopics, or what is the best speech. With this information systematic advertisements can beplaced or other short notice program activities for the benefit of the attendees can beinitiated. The recommendation here is to carefully monitor Twitter and decide on anappropriate reaction. The monitoring can be automated with a tool like Tweetdeck4. It is atool which displays all messages to an event and its related hashtags in real time andallows you to keep track of all messages so that you can plan your reactions carefully.Provide online material after the event. We have seen that even after the event Twitterusage can be fostered. The event is not finished after the actual happening is over - theactive Twitter users talk about it for a few days. For an event organizer or speaker thedays after the event are perfect for preparing a wrap-up and other material and put it4 Tweetdeck can be downloaded for free from http://www.tweetdeck.com/desktop/.Social Media: How To Get The Most Out Of Twitter To Make Your Event A Success 12
  • 14. amiando.com – online event registration & ticketingonline after a few days. Thus the attendees get new input on their discussion to share anda new peak occurs.Social Media Power UsersThe maximum number of tweets written by one person was 399, followed by anotherindividual with 219 tweets. But most of the active Twitter users, specifically 6,347 (65%),tweeted only once and 1,235 active Twitter users wrote two tweets. Figure 6 shows thedistribution of tweets among all active Twitter users – it becomes obvious that a fairlysmall part produces the majority of tweets: 35% are responsible for 80% of the posts. 35% of the Active Twitter Users Produce 80% of the Tweets 100% 90% Cumulative percentage of Twitter users 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Cumulative percentage of tweets Source: amiando.com , 2010Figure 6: Active Twitter users vs. tweets per event.The analysis shows that there are a lot of random users and a relatively small part ofpower users. This distribution is a common phenomenon. The power users are those whotweet a lot and have in addition to that usually a very large group of followers, i.e. a lot ofpeople read what they write. Thus they have great influence. They owe their followers thenews and thus they keep on tweeting - however, only few people have this status. Incontrast to the power users, people who tweet only one or two times usually have a verySocial Media: How To Get The Most Out Of Twitter To Make Your Event A Success 13
  • 15. amiando.com – online event registration & ticketingsmall entourage on Twitter. They do not feel the obligation to tweet so much informationand are less influential. The majority of the people belong to this group How to Use This for Your EventPay attention to the power users. Power users make only a small part of the people whoare tweeting at events, but they have a lot of influence. Their many followers read andretweet their tweets or comment them. Thus they are strong multipliers for both, positiveand also negative comments. Further, power users are also a good indicator for the hottopics of the conference and therefore represent a valuable source of information whichcan be used for systematic marketing and advertisement campaigns. Our recommendationis to monitor power users carefully. You can use the free online tool Twittergrader5 toevaluate how influential a Twitter user is. In case of negative posts, immediate action isrequired e.g. by answering them or taking care of the problem brought up by them.Encourage the random users. The users who post only one or two messages can beanimated to tweet more. The best way to do that is to directly address them and start aconversation. Thus they notice that others are reading their messages and feel encouragedto tweet more, e.g. feedback or information. Also the small users can be turned intoinformation sources.A Last Word: Applying these Findings to Other Social MediaWith this study we wanted to find pattern in the behavior of active Twitter users atevents. We have found some valuable insights and have drawn conclusions which help tooptimize the usage of Twitter as a Social Media channel for events.However, the findings and implications we have presented in this study are based on theusage of Twitter only. But Social Media in general consist of a lot more channels than onlyTwitter. Although Twitter is a widely-used dynamic medium there are a lot more channelsto take into consideration when planning an integrated Social Media strategy. The resultswe gained here might not have occurred in the same way in other Social Media. But wealso want to point out that a lot of the recommendations we gave can be applied to otherSocial Media, too.5 Twittergrader can be accessed for free at http://twittergrader.com/.Social Media: How To Get The Most Out Of Twitter To Make Your Event A Success 14
  • 16. amiando.com – online event registration & ticketingThe AuthorsDennis von Ferenczy Sandro Spiess Anja StaudtCo-founder Social Media Marketing Social Media MarketingHead of Business Development Manager Manager& Strategydennis.ferenczy@amiando.com sandro.spiess@amiando.com anja.staudt@amiando.comAbout amiando – event registration & ticketingamiando (http://www.amiando.com) is a pioneer for online registration and ticketing.Since its founding in 2006 amiando has become a leading software-as-a-service platformfor professional events.amiando’s products help event organizers reach a professional level of event organizationthat until now was only reserved for large corporations and event agencies. All tools areonline-based and immediately available for use, no software installation required. Over100,000 events worldwide use amiando for invitation management, participantregistration, online promotion and payment handling, among them such prestigious namesas Facebook, BMW, UNESCO, and Telefónica O2.amiando has been awarded numerous prizes for its innovative products, among them the“Technology Pioneer of 2010” at the World Economic Forum, and the „eco Internet Award”as the best business client portal. The company is supported by prestigious VentureCapitalists such as Wellington Partners, Adinvest, and a network of international BusinessAngelsInformation, Links Contactamiando: http://www.amiando.com Dennis von Ferenczyamiando features: http://www.amiando.com/features Phone: +49.(0)89. 5 52 73 58-32amiando press: http://www.amiando.com/press Tumblingerstr. 23amiando blog: http://blog.amiando.com 80337 Munich, Germany dennis.ferenczy@amiando.comSocial Media: How To Get The Most Out Of Twitter To Make Your Event A Success 15