From Telephones to Tablets: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly

3,254 views
3,122 views

Published on

A talk to a couple of Silicon Valley computer user groups on selecting a smartphone, tablet, or eReader. Also includes some age-related and ethnic-related secondary market data concerning use of mobile devices.

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
3,254
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • IDC - Press Release Smartphone Market Grows 79.7% Year Over Year in First Quarter of 2011, According to IDC Top Five Smartphone VendorsNokia, despite announcing its intentions to move from Symbian to Windows Phone as its primary smartphone operating system, maintained its leadership position in the smartphone market. Demand for Symbian-powered smartphones remained strong within its traditionally strongest markets of EMEA and Asia/Pacific, and the company continues to announce more devices running on Symbian, including the E6 and the X7. Still, as Nokia transitions from Symbian to Windows Phone, it may find itself in danger of ceding market share as the competition ramps up smartphone production.Apple reached a new record shipment volume in a single quarter, and inched closer to market leader Nokia with fewer than six million units separating the two companies. The company posted market-beating year-over-year growth and recorded triple-digit growth in two key markets: the United States, with the release of its CDMA-enabled iPhone, and Greater China. Additionally, the company enlisted South Korean Telecom and Saudi Telecom as carrier providers of the iPhone.Research In Motion remained solidly in third place from the previous quarter, as the company grew its presence outside of its home territory of North America. RIM has launched several 3G devices to the market, and recently announced two new BlackBerry smartphones running on its new BlackBerry 7 OS. Still, the majority of RIM's shipment volumes have been comprised of older, lower-cost devices. The company expects this trend to continue into the following quarter.Samsung posted the largest year-over-year gain of any other vendor on the list. With a multiple operating system strategy in place, Samsung has been able to grow its smartphone portfolio to meet the needs of a diverse market. Accounting for the majority of its smartphones and driving shipment volumes higher was the continued success of its Android-based smartphones, including the high-end Galaxy S devices and mass-market Galaxy Ace and Galaxy mini devices. Meanwhile, its bada-powered Wave devices and Windows Phone 7 devices continued to gain traction.HTC posted yet another record shipment volume, nearly surpassing the ten million unit mark for the first time. Like other vendors, HTC announced multiple new devices, including the Facebook-optimized Salsa and ChaCha. In addition, the company launched several new devices, including its Inspire 4G, WiMAX-enabled EVO Shift 4G, and LTE-enabled Thunderbolt. These, along with its investment and developments on hardware, displays, and its HTC Sense layer have helped HTC differentiate itself further in an increasingly crowded market.Source: IDC May 2011- http://www.idc.com/getdoc.jsp?containerId=prUS22815911
  • LTE Infrastructure Spending to Soar in Next Four Years April 8, 2011 JAGDISH REBELLO, PHDMass deployment of long term evolution (LTE) wireless infrastructure is beginning in 2011 as many carriers in the United States and Europe seek to migrate their networks to 4G over the next three years. During this time, spending on LTE infrastructure gear will expand to $27.9 billion globally, up from just $1.5 billion in 2010, according to new IHS iSuppliresearch.Initially, LTE infrastructure spending will occur in North America, which accounted for $90 million out of $97 million in global LTE spending in 2009 and nearly half of worldwide spending in 2010. This year, North America will also make up $1.7 billion of the projected $3.8 billion spent globally on LTE infrastructure. However, after 2011, spending will ramp up considerably in other regions, and North America’s influence will dwindle to less than 20 percent of overall global spending. Overall, growth of LTE infrastructure spending will reach $27.9 billion by 2014, managing a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of a 107.5 percent from $1.5 billion in 2010—a spectacular eighteenfold expansion.“While this spending represents tremendous growth in next-generation wireless technology, carriers still will be required to support multiple air interface technologies simultaneously, as the migration to 4G and LTE will not happen overnight,” noted JagdishRebello, senior director and principal analyst for communications and consumer electronics at IHS. “In most cases, carriers will need to offer 2.5G, 3.5G and 4G technologies in order to support all customers and roaming customers. As a result, semiconductor suppliers must focus on developing effective infrastructure solutions that not only meet the current needs of carriers but also achieve alignment with the 3G/3.5G technology migration paths of the carriers to 4G.”Some original equipment manufacturers (OEM) already are starting to promote solutions that support migration from any previous generation to 4G, Rebello added. However, in the long run, these solutions will need to be flexible enough to accommodate the changing needs of the operators.New Business Models—New Architectures As data traffic on the networks of mobile operators continually grow at exponential rates, driven primarily by rising consumer adoption of video streaming services, mobile operators are carefully looking at their business models and network deployment plans, Rebello said. Around the world, mobile network operators (MNOs) are trying to create plans that allow them to deploy 3.75G and 4G networks while also profitably monetizing data traffic.For operators, this means moving increasingly to tiered pricing plans based on the amount of bandwidth consumed. IHS believes that such a move constitutes the first step in operators’ attempts to transition their networks from ‘dumb pipes’ to ‘metered dumb pipes’, and then eventually to ‘smart pipes.’Furthermore, to successfully monetize data traffic, operators will have to migrate their networks to smarter networks that can provide dynamic quality-of-service guarantees, prioritize traffic, and offer certain services that can be exempt from data traffic ceilings.Differentiated pricing plans also could be presented that allow consumers to choose options tailored to their needs. This way, consumers could choose to pay price premiums for the option to access video streaming applications, or choose plans that only offer data services and web access.To do all this, Rebello said, operators will need to evolve their networking architecture into a heterogeneous architecture involving a combination of macro cells, micro cells and small cells, co-existing with femto cells and WLAN (wireless local area network) mesh networks. Such heterogeneous architectures will have to be optimized with end-to-end solutions, which will allow operators to implement service-level policies on data packets through their networks.Big Future for Small ArchitecturesA critical part of this future network architecture, IHS believes, will be the implementation of small architectures. Small cells—also referred to as pico cells and metro area cells—will allow operators to deploy 3G/4G network coverage in dense urban areas possessing a high concentration of mobile data users. If properly implemented, small cells can be tuned so that the network capacity is aligned with periods of high use. For example, small cells in urban downtown areas can be turned off at night when data consumption by enterprise users in these areas declines, Rebello noted.If operators are able to successfully monetize data and manage the bandwidth crunch, it is clear that networks will have to evolve from the current homogenous architecture into intelligent, managed heterogeneous architectures, Rebello observed further.“This means tremendous opportunities will be available for infrastructure OEMs, silicon suppliers and software providers to offer differentiated end-to-end solutions, and for operators to take advantage of the explosive growth in data,” he added.
  • Why Mobile Broadband?Mobile broadband provides accelerated data speeds and simultaneous voice and data capabilities for an amazing wireless voice and data experience.Access faster on-demand viewing of high quality video clips from your favorite TV shows, news, sports and weather.Surf the wireless Internet faster and significantly lower your wait for page loads.Download files and access email faster from favorite providers like Yahoo!, MSN, and AOL.Multitask while you are on a call – search for movie times, look up directions, or send messages.Get more done with faster access to email and internet. AT&T LaptopConnect gives you the power of the AT&T network while you're on the go.TechnologyThe AT&T 3G network uses HSPA/UMTS technology (High Speed Packet Access/Universal Mobile Telephone System), which makes it possible to enjoy a variety of feature-rich wireless services. It also gives AT&T the advantage of offering simultaneous voice and data services. That means you can talk and use the Internet at the same time.AT&T has the leading global footprint. AT&T customers can make and receive calls in more than 220 countries and send e-mail and browse the Internet in more than 200 countries, including more than 130 countries with 3G coverageWe're the nation's largest Wi-Fi provider, offering access at more than 125,000 hot spots globally
  • $299.99 for Verizon 32 GB verision
  • HTC ThunderboltTalk and Standby Time4TT: 446 mins/6.30 hoursSB: 330 hours/18 daysForm FactorCapacitive Touch; CandybarBand/Modes1800/1900, CDMA EVDO rev A, LTE 700OSAndroid 2.2, HTC SenseWeight164 g / 5.78 ozDimensions122 (x) x 66 (y) x 13 (z) mm4.80 (x) x 2.60 (y) x 0.52 (z) inchesBrowser1HTML browser; Flash 10 readyEmail Support1GmailTM, Exchange, IMAP, POP, SMTP, GmailTM, MSN Hotmail, Yahoo and AOL®Processor1Snapdragon 1000MHz, 768 MB RAMBattery1400 mAhConnectivity1Bluetooth® v2.1+EDR, 3.5mm Headset jack, Micro-USB, 2.0Display4.30”, 480x800 WVGA TFTMessaging1SMS/MMS, Full HTML5 BrowserAudioAMR-NB/WB, MP3, WAV, AAC, OGG, MIDI, WMAVideoAdvanced Video record/playback (1280x720), MPEG4, XviD, WMV, 3GP, 3G2 (720p)Camera8.0 megapixel, AutoFocus, Face Detection, Geo Tagging, Efects, Dual LED Flash and image stablization, Front-Facing (1.3MP) CameraMemory8GB emmc + 768 RAM, preinstalled 32 GB microSDLocation Services1GPS, aGPS, NavigationExtras802.11b/g, 802.11b, 802.11n, AccelerometerSource: Android Central
  • IDC - Press Release Smartphone Market Grows 79.7% Year Over Year in First Quarter of 2011, According to IDC Top Five Smartphone VendorsNokia, despite announcing its intentions to move from Symbian to Windows Phone as its primary smartphone operating system, maintained its leadership position in the smartphone market. Demand for Symbian-powered smartphones remained strong within its traditionally strongest markets of EMEA and Asia/Pacific, and the company continues to announce more devices running on Symbian, including the E6 and the X7. Still, as Nokia transitions from Symbian to Windows Phone, it may find itself in danger of ceding market share as the competition ramps up smartphone production.Apple reached a new record shipment volume in a single quarter, and inched closer to market leader Nokia with fewer than six million units separating the two companies. The company posted market-beating year-over-year growth and recorded triple-digit growth in two key markets: the United States, with the release of its CDMA-enabled iPhone, and Greater China. Additionally, the company enlisted South Korean Telecom and Saudi Telecom as carrier providers of the iPhone.Research In Motion remained solidly in third place from the previous quarter, as the company grew its presence outside of its home territory of North America. RIM has launched several 3G devices to the market, and recently announced two new BlackBerry smartphones running on its new BlackBerry 7 OS. Still, the majority of RIM's shipment volumes have been comprised of older, lower-cost devices. The company expects this trend to continue into the following quarter.Samsung posted the largest year-over-year gain of any other vendor on the list. With a multiple operating system strategy in place, Samsung has been able to grow its smartphone portfolio to meet the needs of a diverse market. Accounting for the majority of its smartphones and driving shipment volumes higher was the continued success of its Android-based smartphones, including the high-end Galaxy S devices and mass-market Galaxy Ace and Galaxy mini devices. Meanwhile, its bada-powered Wave devices and Windows Phone 7 devices continued to gain traction.HTC posted yet another record shipment volume, nearly surpassing the ten million unit mark for the first time. Like other vendors, HTC announced multiple new devices, including the Facebook-optimized Salsa and ChaCha. In addition, the company launched several new devices, including its Inspire 4G, WiMAX-enabled EVO Shift 4G, and LTE-enabled Thunderbolt. These, along with its investment and developments on hardware, displays, and its HTC Sense layer have helped HTC differentiate itself further in an increasingly crowded market.Source: IDC May 2011- http://www.idc.com/getdoc.jsp?containerId=prUS22815911
  • Over 15 suppliers will be selling Android-based tablets by mid 2011, including Acer, Cisco, Dell, Motorola, OpenPeak, Samsung, Viewsonic, and many more. Based on a recent study from IMS Research.
  • Based on a recent study, IMS Research forecasts that Android will grow its share of the market from a projected 15.2% in 2011 to 28.4% in 2015
  • LTE Infrastructure Spending to Soar in Next Four Years April 8, 2011 JAGDISH REBELLO, PHDMass deployment of long term evolution (LTE) wireless infrastructure is beginning in 2011 as many carriers in the United States and Europe seek to migrate their networks to 4G over the next three years. During this time, spending on LTE infrastructure gear will expand to $27.9 billion globally, up from just $1.5 billion in 2010, according to new IHS iSuppliresearch.Initially, LTE infrastructure spending will occur in North America, which accounted for $90 million out of $97 million in global LTE spending in 2009 and nearly half of worldwide spending in 2010. This year, North America will also make up $1.7 billion of the projected $3.8 billion spent globally on LTE infrastructure. However, after 2011, spending will ramp up considerably in other regions, and North America’s influence will dwindle to less than 20 percent of overall global spending. Overall, growth of LTE infrastructure spending will reach $27.9 billion by 2014, managing a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of a 107.5 percent from $1.5 billion in 2010—a spectacular eighteenfold expansion.“While this spending represents tremendous growth in next-generation wireless technology, carriers still will be required to support multiple air interface technologies simultaneously, as the migration to 4G and LTE will not happen overnight,” noted JagdishRebello, senior director and principal analyst for communications and consumer electronics at IHS. “In most cases, carriers will need to offer 2.5G, 3.5G and 4G technologies in order to support all customers and roaming customers. As a result, semiconductor suppliers must focus on developing effective infrastructure solutions that not only meet the current needs of carriers but also achieve alignment with the 3G/3.5G technology migration paths of the carriers to 4G.”Some original equipment manufacturers (OEM) already are starting to promote solutions that support migration from any previous generation to 4G, Rebello added. However, in the long run, these solutions will need to be flexible enough to accommodate the changing needs of the operators.New Business Models—New Architectures As data traffic on the networks of mobile operators continually grow at exponential rates, driven primarily by rising consumer adoption of video streaming services, mobile operators are carefully looking at their business models and network deployment plans, Rebello said. Around the world, mobile network operators (MNOs) are trying to create plans that allow them to deploy 3.75G and 4G networks while also profitably monetizing data traffic.For operators, this means moving increasingly to tiered pricing plans based on the amount of bandwidth consumed. IHS believes that such a move constitutes the first step in operators’ attempts to transition their networks from ‘dumb pipes’ to ‘metered dumb pipes’, and then eventually to ‘smart pipes.’Furthermore, to successfully monetize data traffic, operators will have to migrate their networks to smarter networks that can provide dynamic quality-of-service guarantees, prioritize traffic, and offer certain services that can be exempt from data traffic ceilings.Differentiated pricing plans also could be presented that allow consumers to choose options tailored to their needs. This way, consumers could choose to pay price premiums for the option to access video streaming applications, or choose plans that only offer data services and web access.To do all this, Rebello said, operators will need to evolve their networking architecture into a heterogeneous architecture involving a combination of macro cells, micro cells and small cells, co-existing with femto cells and WLAN (wireless local area network) mesh networks. Such heterogeneous architectures will have to be optimized with end-to-end solutions, which will allow operators to implement service-level policies on data packets through their networks.Big Future for Small ArchitecturesA critical part of this future network architecture, IHS believes, will be the implementation of small architectures. Small cells—also referred to as pico cells and metro area cells—will allow operators to deploy 3G/4G network coverage in dense urban areas possessing a high concentration of mobile data users. If properly implemented, small cells can be tuned so that the network capacity is aligned with periods of high use. For example, small cells in urban downtown areas can be turned off at night when data consumption by enterprise users in these areas declines, Rebello noted.If operators are able to successfully monetize data and manage the bandwidth crunch, it is clear that networks will have to evolve from the current homogenous architecture into intelligent, managed heterogeneous architectures, Rebello observed further.“This means tremendous opportunities will be available for infrastructure OEMs, silicon suppliers and software providers to offer differentiated end-to-end solutions, and for operators to take advantage of the explosive growth in data,” he added.
  • Google gave away at Google I/OSamsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 was initially launched at CTIA 2011 event. The tablet runs on Android OS 3.0 HoneyComb, 1 GHz dual-core processor, 10.1” WXGA display with 1280 x 800 resolution, 4G LTE/WiMax connectivity, 16/32/64 GB variants, 2-megapixels rear-camera with LED flash, 720p HD video recording capability, 1080p full HD video playback,DLNA support, 2-megapixel front-facing camera, Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n powered by a 6860 mAh battery.Read more: http://gadgetian.com/14647/samsung-galaxy-tab-10-1-wi-fi-june-8-price/#ixzz1M4B9l11k
  • Digital musical instruments are another example of where USB is competitive for low-cost devices. However Power over Ethernet and the MIDI plug standard are preferred in high-end devices that must work with long cables. USB can cause ground loop problems in equipment because it connects the ground wires on both transceivers. By contrast, the MIDI plug standard and Ethernet have built-in isolation to 500 V or more.Board of DirectorsThe USB-IF, Inc. Board of Directors is composed of the following companies and their designated representative Directors:Hewlett-Packard Company - Alan BerkemaIntel Corporation - Brad Saunders LSI Corporation - Dave Thompson Microsoft Corporation - Toby Nixon Renesas Electronics - Steve Roux ST-Ericsson - Jean-Francois Gatto
  • Intel Specs for SATA Drive (Source: Intel)Technical specificationsModel nameIntel® Solid-State Drive 510 SeriesCapacity120GB and 250GBNAND flash components34-nm Intel® NAND Flash Memory multi-level cell compute-quality componentsBandwidth2Sustained sequential reads120GB250GBUp to 400 MB/s(SATA 6 Gb/s)Up to 265 MB/s(SATA 3 Gb/s)Up to 500 MB/s(SATA 6 Gb/s)Up to 265 MB/s(SATA 3 Gb/s)Sustained sequential writes120GB250GBUp to 210 MB/s(SATA 6 Gb/s)Up to 200 MB/s(SATA 3 Gb/s)Up to 315 MB/s(SATA 6 Gb/s)Up to 240 MB/s(SATA 3 Gb/s)Read latency365 microseconds (120GB and 250GB)Write latency380 microseconds (120GB and 250GB)Random I/O Operations per Second (IOPS)4Random 4KB Reads: up to 20K IOPSRandom 4KB Writes: up to 8K IOPSInterfaceCompatible with SATA 1.5 Gb/s and 3 Gb/sForm factor, height and weight2.5 inch industry standard form factorHeight: 9.5 mm thickWeight: 80 grams (± 2 grams)Life expectancy1.2 million hours Mean Time Between Failure (MTBF)Power consumptionActive: 380 mW Typical5Idle: 100 mW Typical6Operating shock1,500G/0.5 msOperating temperature 0°C to 70°C
  • Many devices have become popular across generations, with a majority now owning cell phones, laptops and desktop computers. Younger adults are leading the way in increased mobility, preferring laptops to desktops and using their cell phones for a variety of functions, including internet, email, music, games, and video.Cell phones are by far the most popular device among American adults. Some 85% of adults own cell phones, and 90% of all adults—including 62% of those age 75 and older—live in a household with at least one working cell phone.Desktop computers are most popular with adults ages 35-65, and Millennials are the only generation that is more likely to own a laptop computer or netbook than a desktop: 70% own a laptop, compared with 57% who own a desktop.Almost half of all adults own an iPod or other mp3 player, but these are still most popular with Millennials—74% of adults ages 18-34 own an mp3 player, compared with only 56% of the next oldest generation, Gen X (ages 35-46).Game consoles are uniformly popular with all adults ages 18-46, 63% of whom own these devices.Overall, 5% of adults own an e-book reader, and 4% own an iPad or other tablet computer.Additionally, about one in 11 (9%) adults do not own any of the devices we asked about, including 43% of adults age 75 and older.
  • From Telephones to Tablets: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly

    1. 1. From Telephones To TabletsThe Good, The Bad and The Ugly<br />Stanford Palo Alto Users GroupSilicon Valley Computer Society<br />May 2011<br />Angela Hey<br />Technology Marketing Consultant Techviser<br />Technology Columnist Mountain View Voice<br />amhey@techviser.com<br />(650) 851-7865<br />
    2. 2. Overview<br /><ul><li>Smartphones
    3. 3. Tablets
    4. 4. eReaders
    5. 5. Connections
    6. 6. Lifestyle
    7. 7. Conclusions</li></ul>2<br />
    8. 8. Motorola movie<br />Huffington Post article<br />3<br />History<br />Source: Huffington Post<br />
    9. 9. Smartphones<br />4<br />
    10. 10. Smartphone Vendor Shipments<br />Source: IDC Worldwide Quarterly Tracker May 2011<br />5<br />
    11. 11. Smartphones and Mobile Phones<br />6<br />79.7% Growth<br />19.8% Growth<br />Source: IDC Worldwide Quarterly Tracker May 2011<br />
    12. 12. Talking and Texting<br />Source: Nielsen Telecom Q4 2010<br />7<br />
    13. 13. Battery Life<br />Big Screen, Fast Processor – Worse Battery Life<br />Looking for networks uses battery<br />Apps that poll for data drain the battery<br />Size<br />Keyboard<br />Do you really need a physical keyboard?<br />Camera quality<br />Memory – Inside, Removable Card or Both<br />Screen legibility – bright light, fonts<br />Apps<br />Communications<br />Can it be a WiFi hotspot?<br />Upload and Download Speeds<br />Price and Contract<br />Service Coverage<br />8<br />Smartphone Considerations<br />
    14. 14. AT&T Wireless Data <br />9<br />Ugly<br />Source:AT&T<br />
    15. 15. Apple iPhone 4<br />Apple iOS<br />Now from AT&T and Verizon<br />Now in white<br />iPhone 5 speculation – voice recognition, faster<br />The Good<br />The Bad<br />Not on Sprint<br />No removable battery<br />No extra memory slot<br />Sync with iTunes could be more reliable<br />Duplicates, incomplete<br />AppStore controls distribution<br />No Flash<br />Expensive for latest version<br />10<br />Smooth user interface<br />AppStore is easy to use<br />350,000 apps<br />Wide-angle 5 megapixel camera<br />Easy to read<br />Simultaneous voice/data, including VoIP<br /><ul><li>Source: Verizon, Apple</li></li></ul><li>HTC Evo 3D<br />Google Android<br />Announced Mar 2011Coming summer<br />HTC Thunderbolt LTE phone on Verizon<br />The Good<br />The Bad<br />Uses battery– so big battery 1730 mAh<br />Heavy – 6 oz<br />4GB internal memory<br />11<br /><ul><li>Dual Core Processor
    16. 16. Access point for up to 8 WiFi devices
    17. 17. FastWiMax 4G
    18. 18. 3D 5 MP cameras, 1.3 MP front camera
    19. 19. HD 1080p in 2D, 720p in 3D
    20. 20. Micro SD card up to 32 GB</li></ul>Source: HTC<br />
    21. 21. HTC Droid Incredible 2<br />Android<br />Verizon<br />The Good<br />The Bad<br />720p HD video (not 1080p)<br />Pre-installed Verizon apps that can be removed<br />3G not LTE<br />12<br /><ul><li>8MP camera, 1.3 MP front camera
    22. 22. FM Radio
    23. 23. Hotspot for up to 5 devices
    24. 24. 16GB pre-installed SD card
    25. 25. Source: Amazon.com</li></li></ul><li>RIM Blackberry Bold 9780<br />The Good<br />The Bad<br />512 MB onboard memory<br />Small Screen<br />13<br />Ugly<br />AT&T<br />Can buy unlocked from Amazon for roaming<br /><ul><li>Keyboard
    26. 26. Long battery life
    27. 27. 5 MP camera
    28. 28. microSD card
    29. 29. Small and Light – 4.3oz
    30. 30. Removable battery
    31. 31. 6 hours talk time
    32. 32. Enterprise server secure connection
    33. 33. Source: Amazon.com</li></li></ul><li>Tablets<br />14<br />
    34. 34. Global Tablet Forecast<br />Source: iSuppli and Lance Whitney cnet<br />15<br />
    35. 35. 16<br />US Tablet Forecasts<br />Source: Forrester Research in TechCrunch, Erick Schonfeld<br />
    36. 36. Apple Market Share<br />17<br />Source: iSuppli<br />
    37. 37. Are You A Reader Or Writer Or Both?<br />Tablets Are Good For Mainly Readers<br />Is It Personal Or Shared?<br />Cost?<br />Which Apps Do You Need?<br />Do You Like The User Interface?<br />Do You Need Color and Pictures?<br />Do You Want To Browse Flash Websites?<br />Is Windows Compatibility Necessary?<br />18<br />Tablet Considerations<br />
    38. 38. Apple iPad 2<br />Apple iOSAT&T and Verizon or just WiFi<br />The Good<br />Cons<br />Expensive<br />$829 for 64GB WiFi & 3G<br />$629 for 16GB WiFi & 3G<br />$499 for 16GB WiFi <br />Apple can’t meet demand<br />Can’t read Flash websites<br />19<br /><ul><li>65,000 iPad apps including Kindle and eReader software
    39. 39. 10 hours battery life
    40. 40. 2 cameras
    41. 41. Dual-core Apple A5 chip
    42. 42. Great design – 0.34” thick, 1.33 lb, 9.7” display</li></ul>Source: Apple<br />
    43. 43. Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1<br />The Good<br />The Bad<br />No microSD, microUSB<br />3MP main camera <br />20<br />Android<br />Kindle software for T-Mobile, Sprint, Verizon<br />Nook for AT&T<br />7” version, 10.1” version in stores June 8, 2011<br /><ul><li>Can read Flash websites
    44. 44. Big 10.1” screen
    45. 45. 2MP front camera for video
    46. 46. Google gave 5000 away to developers
    47. 47. From $399 – 16GB
    48. 48. 4G LTE/WiMAX</li></ul>Source: Samsung, gadgetian.com<br />
    49. 49. eReaders<br />21<br />
    50. 50. eReader Forecasts<br /> IMS Research forecasts 120% growth in eReaders in 2011 to 26.2M units<br />4Q2010 eReader shipments were up 116% from 4Q2009 to 5.1M units<br />Amazon Kindle<br />Barnes & Noble Nook<br />Leading color eReader<br />Sony<br />Hanvon<br />Leader in China<br />U.S. sales of e-books are set to almost triple to $2.8 billion by 2015, according to Forrester Research Inc.<br />Source: Business Week<br />22<br />
    51. 51. Will you travel worldwide?<br />3G Kindle may be useful<br />Do I need long battery life?<br />Can I survive with black and white?<br />Do I like a high contrast screen?<br />Is this a personal or shared device?<br />Can I live with just WiFi?<br />23<br />eReader Considerations<br />
    52. 52. Amazon Kindle<br />LinuxKindle 3G and Kindle DX<br />The Good<br />The Bad<br />Grayscale -16 shades<br />4GB internal storage (in practice 3GB)<br />24<br /><ul><li>Long battery life
    53. 53. High contrast
    54. 54. eInk Pearl
    55. 55. Text-to-speech
    56. 56. Free 3G worldwide*
    57. 57. *For 3G versions
    58. 58. Source: Amazon.com, engadget.com</li></li></ul><li>Nook Color<br />Android<br />The Good<br /><ul><li>Good value – WiFi version $249 (B&W $149, $199 with 3G)
    59. 59. Compact – 7” screen
    60. 60. Reads Flash
    61. 61. Access 2 million books
    62. 62. microSD card + 8GB memory includes 5GB for content
    63. 63. Replaceable battery
    64. 64. Backup online
    65. 65. Software versions for iPad, PC, iPhone, Android</li></ul>The Bad<br />Not an iPad<br />25<br /><ul><li>For 3G versions
    66. 66. Source: Amazon.com</li></li></ul><li>Peripherals<br />26<br />
    67. 67. Bluetooth Keyboards<br />27<br />Boxwave iPhone<br />Keyboard Buddy<br />Kensington Bluetooth<br />Keyboard Case<br />NUU MiniKeySources: Kensington, Boxwave,NUU<br />
    68. 68. Fitness Accessories<br />28<br />Digifit Connect for iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch<br />Uses ANT+ sensor technology from Dynastream<br />Source: Digifit<br />
    69. 69. Pens For Touch Screens<br />29<br />Kensington Virtuoso Touch Screen Stylus and Pen<br />Source: Kensington<br />
    70. 70. Car Mounts<br />30<br />Source: Kensington<br />
    71. 71. Connections<br />USB and Thunderbolt<br />31<br />
    72. 72. 32<br />Cables<br />Ugly<br />
    73. 73. USB 2.0 – 480 Mbits/sec (60MB/sec)<br />USB 3.0 – released 2008<br />Wireless USB -  480Mbps at 3 meters and 110Mbps at 10 meters – WiMedia Alliance<br />USB On-The-Go<br />USB flash drives widely deployed<br />More than 2B wired USB connections<br />USB keyboards, mice – can go wireless<br />33<br />USB Is Not Going Away<br />Source: Wikipedia, USB.org<br />
    74. 74. An interface for peripherals from Intel and Apple<br />Combines:<br />DisplayPort – connection for Apple monitors<br />PCI-Express – bus for PCs<br />Runs video and data on 2 channels at once<br />One plug both for monitor and disk drive<br />What Is Thunderbolt?<br />34<br />
    75. 75. Thunderbolt On The Mac<br />Can use existing Mini DisplayPort connectors for VGA, HDMI, DVI or DisplayPort screens<br />Source: Apple<br />35<br />
    76. 76. Thunderbolt Transfer Rates<br />Source: LaCie<br />36<br />
    77. 77. DisplayPort Forecasts<br />37<br />
    78. 78. Thunderboltvs USB 3.0 vs USB 2.0<br />Thunderbolt<br />USB 3.0<br />Up to 10 Gbps<br />12x Firewire 800<br />20x USB 2.0<br />2x USB 3.0<br />Combines PCI Express and DisplayPort on One Cable<br />Up to 6 Peripherals<br />Good for disks, displays<br />Up to 5 Gbps<br />38<br />
    79. 79. Solid State Storage<br />Individual Solutions<br />RAID Arrays<br />39<br />
    80. 80. LaCie – Little Big Disk<br />2 250GB Intel 510 Solid State Drives<br />Each drive reads up to 500 MB/sec., writes up to 315 MB/sec.<br />Announced Feb 24, 2011<br />For Individuals – ~Fast Drive<br />40<br />Source: LaCie<br />
    81. 81. Spin up fast<br />Intel laptop drive 56% faster than conventional drive1<br />Save energy => longer battery life<br />No moving parts<br />Solid State Drives<br />¹ As measured by PCMark* Vantage*. Performance tests and ratings measured using a Toshiba* A305-S6916 laptop with 80 GB 2.5" Intel® X25-M SATA Solid-State Disk and 320GB Hitachi* SATA Hard Disk Drive. Tests reflect approximate performance of Intel® products as measured by those tests<br />41<br />
    82. 82. 2001 - a rugged 14GB 3.5" SLC SSD from Adtron cost $42,000.2003 - a 21GB 2.5" PATA SLC SSD from M-Systems cost "less than $11,000".2005 - a 10GB 3.5" SCSI SLC SSD from BiTMICRO - oem price was $2,999.2006 (Jan) - a 24GB PATA SLC SSD from Adtron (commercial temp) cost $5,710.2006 (Dec) - Advanced Media launched a 32GB 2.5" SATA MLC SSD for $1,000.2008 - a fast 32GB 2.5" SATA SLC SSD from Mtron cost about $399.2010 - OCZ said it was shipping a 32GB 2.5" MLC SSD for under $100. 2011 (March) - Intel said its SSD 320 40GB MLC cost $89 in 1,000 unit quantities.<br />Source: StorageSearch.com<br />Trends in SSD Storage<br />42<br />
    83. 83. Promise – RAID Pegasus Storage Product<br />Dual-channel 10 Gb/s Thunderbolt ports<br />800 MB/sec<br />78 watts under full load with 6 hard drives<br />RAID <br />For Workgroups - RAID Storage<br />43<br />Source: Promise, Apple<br />
    84. 84. Lifestyle<br />Who Owns What?<br />Who Does What?<br />What’s Next?<br />Conclusions<br />44<br />
    85. 85. 45<br />Source: Pew Internet SurveyGenerations and Gadgets Sept 2010<br />
    86. 86. 46<br />Activities For The Young<br />Source: Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project surveys, 2008-2010<br />
    87. 87. 47<br />Activities For The Older Folk<br />Source: Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project, April 29-May 30, 2010 Tracking Survey. N=2,252 adults 18 and older. Findings for individual activities are based on internet users<br />
    88. 88. Wi-Fi Direct – Peer-to-peer WiFi – Wi-Fi Alliance<br />WiMedia Ultra Wideband – used in Wireless USB – WiMedia.org<br />Facebook and Instant Messaging SIM cards<br />What’s Next?<br />48<br />
    89. 89. Smartphones are becoming pervasive<br />May have a backlash as more WiFi devices are created<br />Tablets<br />Taking off – an iPad is elegant, but there are alternatives<br />eReaders<br />For individuals on the go<br />Affordable alternatives to tablets<br />49<br />Conclusions<br />

    ×