• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
The Other War: Combating Global Poverty
 

The Other War: Combating Global Poverty

on

  • 964 views

This presentation is about ending poverty in our time. It is about making the right choices that can lead to a much safer world based on a true reverence and respect for human life....

This presentation is about ending poverty in our time. It is about making the right choices that can lead to a much safer world based on a true reverence and respect for human life.
This presentation brings to our attention the daily struggles for survival, and the vast number of impoverished people around the world who lose that struggle. We attempt to demonstrate that all parts of the world have a chance to join an age of unprecedented prosperity, building on global science, technology and markets. However, one can also see that certain parts of the world are caught in a downward spiral of impoverishment, hunger and disease. We demonstrate this by means of case studies.
This presentation attempts at outlining why some countries fail to thrive and how the developed world can assist the rest of humanity get a foothold on the ladder of development.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
964
Views on SlideShare
957
Embed Views
7

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

4 Embeds 7

http://www.lmodules.com 3
http://www.linkedin.com 2
http://www.slideshare.net 1
http://www.docshut.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Our study will… Bring to our attention the daily struggles for survival of the vast number of impoverished people around the world. We attempt to portray the image of the poor via means of a case study on Malawi in Africa.
  • The World Bank technically describes extreme poverty as a person who lives under $1 a day. A better definition is the inability to meet basic needs , such as adequate nutrition, access to safe water, access to basic education, having a livelihood that can generate an income to meet these basic needs, and access to primary health services.
  • The Poor are Voiceless… Kevin carter’s picture of an emaciated girl crawling towards a U.N. feeding center . This photo was taken in 1994 during the Sudan famine. The photographer chased away the bird and the child continued on its journey… What are the odds the little girl is alive today?  Not very high, I'd say.  If she is alive, what quality of life is she likely to have?  She almost certainly has permanent damage from her period of starvation during crucial development, both before and after birth.  As for Kevin Carter himself committed subside on July 7 th 1994. It is argued that he was an emotional individual and his work deeply effected him. He felt that taking pictures was not enough help to end the plight of the poor.
  • Where on the planer are the poorest of the poor ? As we can see from the chart, regions of South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa are the hardest hit… about 70% of the extreme poor on the planet live in these least developed regions of the world. We can see that the incidence of poverty significantly declined from 1981 to 2001 in East Asia. Some of the nations in East Asia are economic powerhouses. Singapore, Hong-Kong, China.
  • There are five reasons why the developed nations of the world should help LDC’s: First: there are many kinds of infrastructure(power grids, roads, and other transport facilities) which are all associated with increasing returns to scale. Second: Economic efficiency requires that the knowledge should be available to all, to maximize the social benefits of knowledge. Third: many social sectors exhibit strong spillovers in their effects. Adam Smith called for the public provision of education. Fourth: societies around the world want to ensure that everybody has an adequate level of access to key goods and services(health care, education, safe drinking water) as a matter of right and justice. Fifth: government will want to help the poorest of the poor not only by providing infrastructure and social investments, but also by providing productive inputs into private businesses, if it is required to help impoverished households get started in market-based activities.
  • It is not enough to diagnose a child. In order to treat the child’s disease it is important to understand the social setting. Sanitation is a tool to remove disease from any community. Technologies such as bed net’s are another tool that is reasonably cheap to implement in LDC’s which would then reduce the cases of malaria significantly. Malaria is a manageable disease and can be cured if caught in time. It is a widely held idea that malaria should be an eradicated disease such as polio and small pox. Having available doctors would further increase the effectiveness of the reduction in many diseases such as malaria. Fertilizer would improve the wellbeing of any community that has a food shortage. Food is not readily available in many nations in Africa. Fertilizer allows communities with proper growing techniques would allow for the people to be well fed leading to an increase in education and health.
  • Meals for all: There have been results in communities in LDC’s where a single meal improved testing scores exponentially. The quality of education when proper nutrition also rises due to a higher retention of information. Attendance also rises when proper nutrition is available. Vocational training is also a key tool in economic development because not only do the people learn, they learn tools that can be productive to their community and to the economy overall. Education in hygiene: presents another key factor in education. If people are educated in HIV/AIDS prevention/ protection, malaria control; they can then begin to improve the next generation of people in their community.
  • *Connecting interior countries: If ways of reaching regions were created, it would allow for any country to spread their goods and services to be traded internationally thus bringing about growth of wealth. *Improvement of safe drinking water: Drinking water has widely been considered to be a human right, thus if any country is to be able to sustain itself there must be access to safe drinking water. Building up the ability for people to access water would improve human wellbeing. *Improvement of Sanitation: In order to prevent the further spread of disease, proper sanitation must be implemented to safely and efficiently remove all unsanitary waste. *Improved movement of information and technology: Many of the world’s LDC’s have little to no access to outside information, even beyond their villages. Information and technology would create a higher living standard and economic growth in the long run.
  • Water management: improved technologies for water harvesting, desalination, small scale irrigation, and improved management of aquifers being depleted by overuse. Water will rise in importance as population densities and climate change interact to produce more regions in acute water stress. Climate forecasting and adjustment: improved measurement of seasonal, inter-annual, and long term climate changes with a view toward prediction as well as adjustment to climate changes Sustainable management of ecosystems: fragile ecosystems around the world are succumbing to anthropogenic forces, often with dire consequences. In many cases, poor communities do not have the technical capacity to monitor changes or to respond in an effective and sustainable manner.
  • Asia has seen a rapid rise in crop yield’s due to the green revolution. The main reason why Asia experienced a higher benefit to this revolution is due to the readily available resource water. Water is the key resource to growing productive crops. Africa on the other hand does not have this plentiful resource. Improvement in irrigation and fertilization would then allow many African communities to use High-yielding varieties of crops such as grain, a staple crop that can be used for trade, and for local consumption. Importing these technologies is cheap and quiet easy to do.

The Other War: Combating Global Poverty The Other War: Combating Global Poverty Presentation Transcript

  • Aditya Mehta Mali Mayfield Vineet Samtani Eric Garcia 05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • Agenda
    • Struggle for survival
    • Image of the Poor – (Malawi)
    • Our generations challenge
    • Why some countries fail to thrive
    • Bangladesh - Microcredit
    • The Ladder of Development
    • Conclusions
    05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
    • Dr. Jeffery D. Sachs of Columbia University
    • Dr. Muhammad Yunus of Grameen Bank
    • Dr. Amartya Sen of Harvard University
    05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • Who are the poor?
    • At least 1 billion people or 1/6 th of humanity lives in extreme poverty.
    05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • 05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
    • More than 8 million people die needlessly each year simply because they are too poor to stay alive.
    • That’s 22,000 per day 900 per hour and 1 every four seconds.
    05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • World distribution of the Poor 05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • 05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • Image of the of the Poor
    • Rural Malawi (Africa)
      • Inadequate infrastructure in unforgiving geographic terrain.
      • Proximity of essential resources of water and fuel (wood) from village.
      • Able bodied human capital lost to AIDS.
      • 10 – 15 orphaned grandchildren per woman.
      • Small farm size, inadequate nutrients lack of water and able bodied workers translate to little or no yield.
      • Inability to control and fight disease. (Malaria)
      • Lack of availability of healthcare and proximity.
      • Daily struggle for survival.
    05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • Is there a reason for poverty to exist in the 21 st century ? In our research we have discovered that there is no significant reason for all of humanity to not be included in enjoying the benefits of human progress. 05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • John Maynard Keynes
    • Economic possibilities for our grandchildren - 1930.
      • Envisioned the end of extreme poverty in Great Britain and other industrial countries towards the end of the twentieth century.
      • Emphasized on advances in science and technology to propel continued economic growth.
    05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • Our Generations Challenge
    • To end the age old daily struggle for survival.
      • Assist the poorest escape extreme poverty.
        • To get a foothold on the ladder of development
      • Ensure that the moderately poor have a chance to climb the ladder
        • Give development assistance
        • Eliminate trade barriers
    05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • Why some countries fail to thrive
    • Poverty trap – Poverty itself is a cause of economic stagflation.
      • Poor rural villages lack
        • Trucks
        • Paved roads
        • Power generators
        • Irrigation channels
      • Human capital is low
        • Hunger
        • Disease
        • Illiteracy
      • Natural resource decline
        • Trees cut down
        • Soil exhausted
      • Lack of saving
        • Need more capital, but unable to save for future
    05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • Why countries fail to thrive cont…
    • Physical geography
      • Landlocked
        • high mountains
        • No coast, navigable rivers, or harbors
          • Ex: Bolivia, Ethiopia, Tibet
      • Arid
      • Tropical diseases
        • Malaria
      • Problems can be overcome
    • Fiscal Trap
      • Government cannot pay for infrastructure
        • Population is too poor
        • Government corrupt, or incapacitated
        • Debt load too high
          • Revenue goes to interest accumulated on debt
    Debt cancellation may be only solution 05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • Why countries fail to thrive cont…
    • Governance Failures
      • Governments should:
        • Promote infrastructure
        • Create an environment conducive to investment
          • Crime free
          • Promote social responsibility
          • Encourage entrepreneurial sprit
          • Political Stability
          • Make Nation attractive for foreign direct investment
        • Defend borders
      • Poor governance results in
        • State Failure
          • War, revolution, anarchy
          • Economic failure
    • Cultural Barriers
      • Religions that block the role of women
        • Deny economic or political rights
        • Deny education
        • Result:
          • Undermines half the population’s contribution to development
          • Slows demographic transition
      • Blocking religious or ethnic minorities
    05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • Why countries fail to thrive cont…
    • Geopolitics
      • Trade barriers erected by foreign countries
        • Impede economic development
        • May target a despicable regime
          • Often ends up impoverishing population
          • Without toppling the regime
          • E.g. Libya, North Korea
    • The demographic trap
      • High fertility rates in the poorest countries
      • Poor families choosing to have many children
        • Disastrous
          • Cannot invest in each child
          • High fertility next generation
      • Demographic transition can occur fast
        • Ex. Iran
          • 1980 fertility = 6.7
          • 2000 fertility = 2.6
        • Education for girls is key
    05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • Why countries fail to thrive cont…
    • Lack of innovation
      • Small market for new inventions
        • No profits = no inventions
      • Endogenous growth cycle:
        • Big markets encourage invention
        • Inventions promote big markets
      • Need foreign investment to bring technology
        • Key to East Asian economies
        • Sweat shops are first step
        • Starts at port cities
        • E.g. Singapore, Hong Kong
    05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • Bangladesh
    • On the first step of the Ladder of Development
    • Per capita income doubled since independence (1971)
      • Infant mortality rates have declined
    • Microcredit more available
    • Health care more available
    • Women now more empowered
      • Fertility rates have declined
      • Want education
      • Want fewer children
    05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • What is Microcredit?
    • Small loans to low income clients who show creativity and accountability.
    • These loans are given out on trust there is no collateral required
    • These loans are paid back in small installments giving the poor a sort of confidence
    • Most of the loans come from non-profit institutions
    05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • A new kind of Business
    • Is Government the answer?
    • The contribution of non profit organizations
    • Corporate Social Responsibility.
    • Multilateral Institutions (World bank and development unable to reach grass roots)
    • Capitalism is a half developed structure
    05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • The Microcredit Revolution
    • Birth of the banker to the poor.
    • A shift in Thinking from the regular capitalistic approach.
    • The evolving Grameen System.
    • Microcredit around the world.
    • Return of moneylenders.
    • Problems with funding microcredit.
    • Mainstream Banks and Microcredit.
    05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • Purpose of this strategy with reference to Bangladesh
    • Improving Rural livelihoods
    • Increasing Confidence among the poor
    • Linking every village in the world
    • Open opportunities for young minds.
    05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • How has this strategy worked so far
    • The poverty rate measured by the world bank has fallen from 74% in 1973-74 to 49% in 2000.
    • Bangladesh’s rapid economic growth has increased with equality.
    • Drop in poverty rates has changed employment patterns Bangladesh economy grew with 71billion the third largest in Asia.
    • Population growth has fallen sharply from 3% in 1970’s to 1.5% in 2000. (Close to India’s 1.4%
    05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • Continued
    • Decline in Population growth has led to increase in healthcare and reduction in infant mortality
    • Increased Life expectancy 56 years through early 1990’s and 65.4 by 2006.
    • Educational Opportunities have increased (% of children that completed 5 th grade increased from 49% in 1990 to 74% in 2004)
    • Between 1980 and 2004 Human Development Index increased by 45% in Bangladesh compared to 39% in India.
    05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • Is Poverty a threat to Peace
    • Poverty is a threat to peace.
    • Poverty denies all human rights.
    • Beggars can turn to Business.
    • Information Technology for the poor.
    • Role of Social Business in Globalization.
    • We can put poverty in the Museums.
    05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • The Ladder of Development
    • Investment of developed countries in LDC’s(GNP)
    • Health Aid (AIDS, Malaria)
    • Primary School Education
    • Basic Infrastructure
    • Global effects on LDC’s
      • Global warming: Drought
    • Green Revolution
    05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • What does .7% of GNP mean?
    • United States: .7% of 13.78Trillion =
    • Japan: .7% of 4.988Trillion =
    • Germany: .7% of 2.807Trillion=
    • U. K.: .7% of 2.130Trillion=
    • Canada: .7% of 1.052Trillion=
    9,646,000,000 + 3,490,000,000 + 1,960,000,000 + 1,490,000,000 + 736,400,000 Total:16,322,400,000 05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • What does .7% mean to us?
    • The average College student earns: 12,000 a year
    05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business 12,000 X .007= 84$ Or Giving up 1 latte every other week .
  • Health Aid
    • Medicine is Family Medicine
    • Safe Drinking water
    • Basic Sanitation
    • Bed net- fighting malaria
    • Available doctors
    • Fertilizer- to grow sustainable food to alleviate hunger
    05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • Investment in education
    • Meals for all in primary school can improve health of all school children
    • Quality of education
    • Attendance of children
    • Vocational training
    • Education in: hygiene, HIV/AIDS, malaria control.
    05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • Investment in Infrastructure
    • Connecting interior countries to regions that allow for international trade
    • Improvement of safe drinking water
    • Improvement of sanitation
    • Improved movement of information and technology
    05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • Global climate effects
    • Water management
    • Climate forecasting
    • Sustainable management of
    • ecosystems
    05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • Green revolution
    • Asia
    • Africa
    • HYV’s
    • Increase in crop yield
    • Improvement of irrigation and fertilization
    05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • Where are we today? 05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • 05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • Conclusions
    • The preconditions for economies to thrive can be achieved.
    • All parts of the world have the chance to join an age of unprecedented prosperity building on global science, technology and markets.
    • Our generation has the power to end the massive suffering of the extreme poor, and thereby making our lives safer in the process.
    05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business
  • Sources
    • http://pamirtimes.files.wordpress.com/2008/05/poverty-picture.jpg
    • http://www.treklens.com/gallery/photo38494.htm
    • http://children.foreignpolicyblogs.com/2008/10/17/the-violence-of-poverty/
    • http://iusbpreface.files.wordpress.com/2007/04/kevin_carter.jpg
    • http://dsrfoundation.org/
    • http://www.freewebs.com/khalid_moustache_man/poverty_children_pictures-640x425.png
    • http://www.earth.columbia.edu/articles/view/1804
    • http://muhammadyunus.org/
    • http://www.grameen-info.org/
    • http://www.earth.columbia.edu/pages/endofpoverty/index
    05/29/10 California Lutheran University: School of Business