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MGT420 Ch01 MGT420 Ch01 Presentation Transcript

  • © 2007 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved.© 2007 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. PowerPoint Presentation by Charlie CookPowerPoint Presentation by Charlie Cook The University of West AlabamaThe University of West Alabama ManagementManagement and Managersand Managers ChapterChapter 11 Part 1 Meeting the Challenges of the 21st CenturyPart 1 Meeting the Challenges of the 21st Century
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–2 1.1. Define what management is.Define what management is. 2.2. Identify and explain the basic managerial functions.Identify and explain the basic managerial functions. 3.3. Understand the roles that managers play.Understand the roles that managers play. 4.4. Discuss the scope of responsibilities of functionalDiscuss the scope of responsibilities of functional and general managers.and general managers. 5.5. Describe the three levels of managers in terms ofDescribe the three levels of managers in terms of the skills they need and the activities in which theythe skills they need and the activities in which they are involved.are involved. 6.6. Identify major changes in the 21st. century andIdentify major changes in the 21st. century and explain how they will affect management ofexplain how they will affect management of organizations.organizations. LEARNING OBJECTIVESLEARNING OBJECTIVES When you have finished studying this chapter, youWhen you have finished studying this chapter, you should be able to:should be able to:
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–3 LEARNING OBJECTIVESLEARNING OBJECTIVES (cont’d)(cont’d) 7.7. Explain the interactions between all of the majorExplain the interactions between all of the major functions that managers perform; the interactionsfunctions that managers perform; the interactions between planning, organizing, leading, andbetween planning, organizing, leading, and controlling.controlling. 8.8. Explain why it is important to study management.Explain why it is important to study management. When you have finished studying this chapter, youWhen you have finished studying this chapter, you should be able to:should be able to:
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–4 What is Management?What is Management? • The Classic DefinitionThe Classic Definition  The art of getting things done through people.The art of getting things done through people. ––Mary Parker FollettMary Parker Follett • A Broader DefinitionA Broader Definition  The process of administering and coordinatingThe process of administering and coordinating resources effectively, efficiently, and in an effort toresources effectively, efficiently, and in an effort to achieve the goals of the organization.achieve the goals of the organization.
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–5 Effectiveness versus EfficiencyEffectiveness versus Efficiency • EffectivenessEffectiveness  Achieved when the organization pursues appropriateAchieved when the organization pursues appropriate goals.goals.  This means “doing the right things.”This means “doing the right things.” • EfficiencyEfficiency  Achieved by using the fewest inputs (e.g., people andAchieved by using the fewest inputs (e.g., people and money) to generate a given output.money) to generate a given output.  This means “doing things right.”This means “doing things right.” • The end result of effective and efficientThe end result of effective and efficient management ismanagement is organizational successorganizational success..
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–6 Management TheoryManagement Theory • It is critical for managers to be able to leadIt is critical for managers to be able to lead people through the fast pace of change.people through the fast pace of change.  Leadership is about coping with both complexity andLeadership is about coping with both complexity and change.change.  As change becomes more dynamic and rapid,As change becomes more dynamic and rapid, managers at all levels must hone their leadershipmanagers at all levels must hone their leadership skills.skills.  Therefore, leaders are managers and managers areTherefore, leaders are managers and managers are leaders.leaders.
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–7 The OrganizationThe Organization • An OrganizationAn Organization  A group of individuals who work together towardA group of individuals who work together toward common goals.common goals. • What do all organizations have in common?What do all organizations have in common?  They are composed of people whose efforts must beThey are composed of people whose efforts must be coordinated if the organization is to accomplish itscoordinated if the organization is to accomplish its goals.goals.
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–8 Figure 1.Figure 1.11 The Management ProcessThe Management Process
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–9 Planning And OrganizingPlanning And Organizing • PlanningPlanning  Setting goals and defining the actions necessary toSetting goals and defining the actions necessary to achieve those goals.achieve those goals. • OrganizingOrganizing  The process of determining the tasks to be done, whoThe process of determining the tasks to be done, who will do them, and how those tasks will be managedwill do them, and how those tasks will be managed and coordinated.and coordinated.
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–10 LeadingLeading • LeadershipLeadership  The capacity to direct and motivate the members ofThe capacity to direct and motivate the members of work groups toward the accomplishment ofwork groups toward the accomplishment of organizational goals.organizational goals. • Leadership Skills:Leadership Skills:  Understanding individual/group behavior dynamicsUnderstanding individual/group behavior dynamics  Having the ability to motivate employeesHaving the ability to motivate employees  Being an effective communicatorBeing an effective communicator  Being able to envision future and share that visionBeing able to envision future and share that vision
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–11 ControllingControlling • Monitoring the performance of the organizationMonitoring the performance of the organization and its progress in implementing strategic andand its progress in implementing strategic and operational plans.operational plans.  Identifying deviations between planned and actualIdentifying deviations between planned and actual results.results.  Taking corrective actionTaking corrective action  Ensuring that the organization is moving toward theEnsuring that the organization is moving toward the achievement of its goals.achievement of its goals.
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–12 ManagersManagers • Managers are the people who plan, organize, lead,Managers are the people who plan, organize, lead, and control the activities of the organization so thatand control the activities of the organization so that its goals can be achieved.its goals can be achieved.
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–13 Figure 1.Figure 1.22 Mintzberg’s Managerial RolesMintzberg’s Managerial Roles
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–14 Mintzberg’s Managerial RolesMintzberg’s Managerial Roles • Interpersonal RolesInterpersonal Roles  The manager’s responsibility for managingThe manager’s responsibility for managing relationships with organizational members and otherrelationships with organizational members and other constituents:constituents:  FigureheadFigurehead  LeaderLeader  LiaisonLiaison
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–15 Mintzberg’s Managerial RolesMintzberg’s Managerial Roles (cont’d)(cont’d) • Informational RolesInformational Roles  The manager’s responsibility for gathering andThe manager’s responsibility for gathering and disseminating information to the stakeholders of thedisseminating information to the stakeholders of the organization:organization:  MonitorMonitor  DisseminatorDisseminator  SpokespersonSpokesperson
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–16 Mintzberg’s Managerial RolesMintzberg’s Managerial Roles (cont’d)(cont’d) • Decisional RolesDecisional Roles  The manager’s responsibility for processingThe manager’s responsibility for processing information and reaching conclusions:information and reaching conclusions:  EntrepreneurEntrepreneur  Disturbance handlerDisturbance handler  Resource allocatorResource allocator  NegotiatorNegotiator
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–17 Chief ExecutiveChief Executive General Parts Inc.General Parts Inc. Plant Manager Service Manager Account Manager Payroll Manager A functional manager is responsible for a work group segmented by function. A functional manager is responsible for a work group segmented by function. VP ofVP of ProductionProduction VP of Finance Scope of Responsibility:Scope of Responsibility: Functional and General ManagersFunctional and General Managers A general manager is responsible for several functional work groups. A general manager is responsible for several functional work groups.
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–18 Types of ManagersTypes of Managers • Functional ManagerFunctional Manager  A manager who is responsible for managing a workA manager who is responsible for managing a work unit that is grouped based on the function served.unit that is grouped based on the function served. • General ManagerGeneral Manager  A manager who is responsible for managing severalA manager who is responsible for managing several different departments that are responsible for differentdifferent departments that are responsible for different tasks.tasks. • First-line managerFirst-line manager  The manager who supervises the operationalThe manager who supervises the operational employees.employees.
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–19 Figure 1.Figure 1.33 Managerial LevelsManagerial Levels
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–20 Figure 1.Figure 1.44 Skills Needed at Different Levels of ManagementSkills Needed at Different Levels of Management
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–21 Management SkillsManagement Skills • Technical SkillsTechnical Skills  The ability to utilize the knowledge of tools,The ability to utilize the knowledge of tools, techniques, and procedures that are specific to atechniques, and procedures that are specific to a particular field.particular field. • Human SkillsHuman Skills  The ability to work effectively with one’s own workThe ability to work effectively with one’s own work group as well as others within the organization.group as well as others within the organization. • Conceptual SkillsConceptual Skills  The ability to process information about theThe ability to process information about the internal/external environment of the organization andinternal/external environment of the organization and determine its implications.determine its implications.
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–22 The New Manager/Leader ProfileThe New Manager/Leader Profile • Managers who:Managers who:  Are no longer “the boss,” rather they act as sponsors,Are no longer “the boss,” rather they act as sponsors, team leaders, or internal consultants.team leaders, or internal consultants.  No longer control from the top of the pyramid; nor tryNo longer control from the top of the pyramid; nor try to control the action from the sidelines.to control the action from the sidelines.  Empower individual employees to do what isEmpower individual employees to do what is necessary to achieve goals.necessary to achieve goals.  Make sure that employees have the resources to getMake sure that employees have the resources to get the job done.the job done.
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–23 Managing in the 21st CenturyManaging in the 21st Century • What’s different?What’s different?  The rate of change continues to increaseThe rate of change continues to increase • What’s the same?What’s the same?  The same basic business, economic, and managerialThe same basic business, economic, and managerial principles still applyprinciples still apply • Important change factors:Important change factors:  The Internet and information technologyThe Internet and information technology  Increasing globalizationIncreasing globalization  Increasing diversityIncreasing diversity  Intellectual capitalIntellectual capital  Increased emphasis on ethics.Increased emphasis on ethics.
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–24 The Internet And Information TechnologyThe Internet And Information Technology • Electronic commerce is working.Electronic commerce is working.  E-businesses are using basic managerial andE-businesses are using basic managerial and business principles and are profitable.business principles and are profitable.  Traditional, brick-and-mortar businesses use of theTraditional, brick-and-mortar businesses use of the Internet as a complement their existing businesses.Internet as a complement their existing businesses. • Benefits of Information TechnologyBenefits of Information Technology  Instant feedback from the marketInstant feedback from the market  More sharing of information internallyMore sharing of information internally  Tighter links to suppliersTighter links to suppliers  Increased globalization and global expansionIncreased globalization and global expansion
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–25 Increasing Globalization of the MarketplaceIncreasing Globalization of the Marketplace • GlobalizationGlobalization  Various companies moving to multiple countries andVarious companies moving to multiple countries and doing business in multiple countries.doing business in multiple countries. • The international business environmentThe international business environment  Involves most organizationsInvolves most organizations—e—even the smallestven the smallest business can reach a global marketplace with relativebusiness can reach a global marketplace with relative ease.ease.  Presents unique managerial challenges in terms ofPresents unique managerial challenges in terms of complexity and a broader set of environmental forces.complexity and a broader set of environmental forces.
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–26 Increasing Diversity in the WorkplaceIncreasing Diversity in the Workplace • DiversityDiversity  The heterogeneity of the population and work forceThe heterogeneity of the population and work force • The challenge of diversityThe challenge of diversity  Developing the strong organizational culture andDeveloping the strong organizational culture and group cohesiveness required for organizationalgroup cohesiveness required for organizational success when the workplace includes people withsuccess when the workplace includes people with different backgrounds, from different nations, or withdifferent backgrounds, from different nations, or with different cultural frames of reference.different cultural frames of reference.
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–27 The Growing Importance of IntellectualThe Growing Importance of Intellectual CapitalCapital • Intellectual capitalIntellectual capital  The sum and synergy of an organization’s knowledge,The sum and synergy of an organization’s knowledge, experience, relationships, processes, discoveries,experience, relationships, processes, discoveries, innovations, market presence and communityinnovations, market presence and community influence.influence. • Major categories of intellectual capitalMajor categories of intellectual capital  Structural capitalStructural capital  Customer capitalCustomer capital  Human capitalHuman capital
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–28 Categories of Intellectual CapitalCategories of Intellectual Capital • Structural capitalStructural capital  The accumulated knowledge of the organizationThe accumulated knowledge of the organization represented by its patents, trademarks andrepresented by its patents, trademarks and copyrights, proprietary databases, and systems.copyrights, proprietary databases, and systems. • Customer capitalCustomer capital  The value of established relationships with customersThe value of established relationships with customers and suppliers.and suppliers. • Human capitalHuman capital  The cumulative skills and knowledge of theThe cumulative skills and knowledge of the organization.organization.
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–29 EthicsEthics • Ethical BehaviorEthical Behavior  Behavior that is considered by most toBehavior that is considered by most to be acceptable.be acceptable. • Sarbanes–Oxley ActSarbanes–Oxley Act  Requires businesses to use certainRequires businesses to use certain accounting rules that would prohibit theaccounting rules that would prohibit the many financial abuses by managersmany financial abuses by managers that came to light in recent years.that came to light in recent years.
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–30 An Overall Framework of ManagementAn Overall Framework of Management • External environmentExternal environment  The setting in which an organization operates; theThe setting in which an organization operates; the markets and industry.markets and industry. • CompetenciesCompetencies  The things that an organization can do well; the skillsThe things that an organization can do well; the skills and abilities.and abilities. • The functions of management all interact withThe functions of management all interact with each other, and together they lead to effectiveeach other, and together they lead to effective and efficient achievement of an organization’sand efficient achievement of an organization’s overall goals.overall goals.
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–31 Figure 1Figure 1–5–5 An Overall Framework of ManagementAn Overall Framework of Management
  • © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–32 Why Study Management?Why Study Management? • Universal applicabilityUniversal applicability  The basic functions that managers perform, the rolesThe basic functions that managers perform, the roles that managers play, and the skills that managers usethat managers play, and the skills that managers use are universal.are universal. • Organizational needOrganizational need  The basic functions—planning, organizing, leading,The basic functions—planning, organizing, leading, and controlling—are required in every organization.and controlling—are required in every organization.