Open Data & Its Value, MISA, London, Ontario, Workshop
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  • Title Slide.** Opening Remarks: “Good Morning/Afternoon!”** Note that this slide is not to be used for the beginning of any Ignite Presentations.
  • Good Afternoon!Some of you may already know who I am, but for those who do not, let me introduce myself.My name is Aaron McGowan and I am one of London’s mobile and web consultants.I am also one of London’s Open Government/Government 2.0 advocates.
  • Furthermore, I am also a member of Open Data London.Open Data London is a grass roots community initiative here in London, ON, led by a handful of advocates and community leaders.The initiative kicked off back in early 2010 by Shawn Adamsson of rTraction, myself a few others, after various discussions at City Hall and the launch of NextStop.However, today, I will be speaking about value and the value of open data to Governments, Businesses and your average Citizen.
  • When thinking about the topic of “open data”, there are many words that come to mind. One being value.The word value can be used as both a noun and a verb.As a noun, value means the importance or preciousness of something.And as a verb, it is the estimated monetary worth of something.Both definitions, as a noun and a verb, can be used when talking about the value of open data.
  • In practice & theory, open data is important and very precious. It deserves a lot of praise.So much praise that open data also needs a fan club, a cheering squad and an army.Not just the adoption and the practice of it, but also rock-stars / champions of open data need the cheerleaders too.
  • Open Data is priceless. An actual dollar amount cannot be assigned easily to determining the value of its practice and adoption.This is because the ROI of open data appears in a variety of forms, from app development to increased citizen engagement.This ROI is also created by countless individuals and not just a select few.Open Data is about public data, which is one of any governments’ most valuable assets. It is also one of the citizens’ greatest assets also when leveraged appropriately.
  • There are five major forms of value that Governments should see when practicing and adopting open data.First is public engagement. This is important, it assists in increasing transparency and participation in government. This includes the good and maybe not so good engagement in criticism & critique. It also helps other’s paint the appropriate picture when sharing stories or reporting about various events.Second is through innovation. Because the public sector cannot innovative as quickly or efficiently as the private sector, therefore through private sector innovation public sector gains value.- One example would be the LTC’s archaic “WebWatch” feature vs. NextStop.
  • Governments also receives value in these three areas too, such as: Economic Growth in the City and surrounding area Internal and External Collaboration Streamlined Processes through the use of privately developed apps and solutions built around data that has been released. An example is the City of Vancouver’s use of ReCollect.net
  • It’s not just governments who see value in open data, businesses and non-profits do too.Similarly to Governments, the private sector can streamline processes with the use of open data.Create new products and services.Improve existing products and/or services.And give back to the community by developing solutions and releasing them to the public for free, without cost to the consumer.
  • Not Far From The Tree is a non-profit in Toronto who is leveraging open data to streamline processes in the organization.They are using open data to determine whether or not plotting trees or other harvestable fruit locations is on private or public property.What used to be a manual and time consuming process is now an automated one that frees up countless man hours spent doing it.
  • As for citizens, it is not just the hackers who receive value, but the average citizen too!Value for citizens is also received through: Self-empowerment, Increase of knowledge and understanding, and Making their lives easier. Making citizens’ lives easier is generally done through the creation and use of apps like NextStop, LondonTrash, eatsure.ca, and Emitter.ca.
  • There are countless examples of where value can be created for governments, businesses and even the general public.One example of where value has been created for the federal government is in a recent analysis of NPOs within the GTA, saving over 3.2 billion dollars in fraudulent organizations.There are countless examples. Some of the local apps that have been created are …
  • LondonTrash.ca is another example of where local citizens, programmers, designers, consultants and even students spent their own personal time developing a solution allowing citizens of London search their address and find out when the next day garbage is collected at the specified address.There is no need to remember London’s complicated garbage pickup cycle and trying to determine when the next pick-up day is.
  • NextStop – London Transit Guide was developed by myself back in 2010 after being overly frustrated with the transit system here in London.The goal of NextStop is to add value to transit users, by providing and dissimentating information about the LTC. More specifically, this app allows users to view the current position of transit vehicles in real-time using GPS capabilities, allowing users to frequently see and locate where or when the next bus will arrive.NextStop is also an example of the kind of innovative products that can be produced through the use of open data. Such innovation in government’s or their respective public agencies take an extremely long.Look at the LTC today, they still have a early 2000s solution.
  • NextStop – London Transit Guide was developed by myself back in 2010 after being overly frustrated with the transit system here in London.The goal of NextStop is to add value to transit users, by providing and dissimentating information about the LTC. More specifically, this app allows users to view the current position of transit vehicles in real-time using GPS capabilities, allowing users to frequently see and locate where or when the next bus will arrive.NextStop is also an example of the kind of innovative products that can be produced through the use of open data. Such innovation in government’s or their respective public agencies take an extremely long.Look at the LTC today, they still have a early 2000s solution.
  • One of the most amazing apps not only created by public service organizations and can be classified as a Government 2.0 app, is called “Fire Department”, developed by the San Ramon Valley Fire Department.The app’s goal is to create a knowledge based community, providing information to certified CPR and AED professionals, who can run to assist in an emergency before the 911 respondents arrive.This app not only geo-locates in real time incidents, but also transmits live CB Radio/Emergency Radio audio to the iPhone devices, allowing virtually anyone to respond and assist in the time of need.This ladies and gentlemen shows the possibilities of the open data adoption and where it is going. This is the future.
  • One of the most amazing apps not only created by public service organizations and can be classified as a Government 2.0 app, is called “Fire Department”, developed by the San Ramon Valley Fire Department.The app’s goal is to create a knowledge based community, providing information to certified CPR and AED professionals, who can run to assist in an emergency before the 911 respondents arrive.This app not only geo-locates in real time incidents, but also transmits live CB Radio/Emergency Radio audio to the iPhone devices, allowing virtually anyone to respond and assist in the time of need.This ladies and gentlemen shows the possibilities of the open data adoption and where it is going. This is the future.
  • Most importantly, it is importantly to note that open data is more then just releasing data and creating apps.At the end of the day, its about:Increasing transparency, collaboration and participation;Building a knowledge based community in a digital age; andCreating value and opportunities for Governments, Businesses and Citizens.
  • Thank you everyone for this brief five minutes. If you have any questions, comments, thoughts or just simply want to talk – let’s chat.I look forward to speaking with many of you, if not all, today. Have a great afternoon.

Open Data & Its Value, MISA, London, Ontario, Workshop Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Open Data & Its Value“Today‟s Open Government – a New Approach to Public Service” Municipal Information Systems Association, Ontario Chapter London, Ontario, November 24, 2011
  • 2. Defining „value‟Noun:• the regard that something is held to deserve• the importance or preciousness of somethingVerb:• Estimate the monetary worth of (something) According to Google.com, http://google.com/search?q=define:value
  • 3. Open Data‟s „Value‟(as a noun)• In practice&theory, open data deserves praise – Its importanceis great – Extremely precious• It needs a fan club, cheering squad & an army – Not only open data, but its rock stars too • Public Sector: Elaine Gamble, City of London • Private Sector: – Businesses: rTraction, Echidna Solutions Corp., Microsoft – Individuals: Titus Ferguson, Noah Stewart, Gavin Blair
  • 4. Open Data‟s „Value‟(as a verb)• It‟s priceless – It could be assigned an amount • but not at the beginning of its adoption • Only over time, after analyzing its use & reduction in Government spending• Its ROI… – is create in many forms (apps, engagement, etc.) – by many people (inside & outside government)• Public data is our greatest asset – With an enormous dollar amount assigned – Paid for by the public (your data = our data)
  • 5. Value to GovernmentsComes in a variety of forms:• Public Engagement – The good and [maybe] not so good • informed criticism& critique – Paints pictures and assists in story telling for public understanding• Innovation – LTC‟s “WebWatch” vs. NextStop – City of London‟s “City Map” vs. Mashups – Documenting pollution via reports for citizens vs. Emitter.ca
  • 6. Value to GovernmentsContinued• Economic Growth – For those cities who have businesses focused around the notion and practice of open government or data• Collaboration – Internally (ex: cross departmental) – Externally (ex: solve problems that are being faced)• Streamlined Processes – Through internally and externally developed applications – Example: City of Vancouver‟s use of ReCollect.net
  • 7. Value to Businesses & Non-Profits• Streamline Processes – Through the reduction of man-hours spent performing grunt like tasks – Automate processes and tasks, allow for man hours to be spent well• Create new products and services – NFFTT‟s Public Fruit Mapping – Rocket Radar (for the TTC) – EatSure.ca• Improve existing products or services• Give back to the community at large – Engage with a larger audience & build communities
  • 8. Value to Citizens• Its not just the “hackers” who get value – It‟s the average citizen too• Value is received through: – Making citizens lives easier • Seen in the creation of apps like NextStop, LondonTrash, eatsure.ca, Emitter.ca – Increasing knowledge and understanding – Self-empowerment
  • 9. An analysis of NPOs in the City of London‟s GTA saved the GoC over approval for a Budget 3.2 billion dollars Data App Contest Currently activeCreating Value & Value CreatedCity of Vancouver received an OpenParliament.ca: Aims toanalysis of potential damages to increase transparency of thethe city by an architecture & Canadian Parliament.engineering firm if there wasever a tsunami Created by Michael Mulley There are countless examples where Open Data has created or is creating value
  • 10. www.nextstopapp.com
  • 11. Its more then just releasing data(and creating apps)At the end of the day, its about…• Increasing transparency, collaboration & participation• Building a knowledge based community• Creating value and opportunities for – Governments, – Businesses, and – Citizens
  • 12. Thank-you!If you have any questions, comments or thoughts… let’s chat!