Leadership & advocacy in volunteer programs

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Slides for a workshop that I presented on March 29, 2011 to volunteer coordinators in Little Rock, AR as part of their preparation to sit for the CVA exam.

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Leadership & advocacy in volunteer programs

  1. 1. Leadership & Advocacy in Volunteer Programs<br />Anthony McAdoo, Ed.D.<br />March 29, 2011<br />Central Chapter<br />AVCA<br />
  2. 2. Developed for the Leadership & Advocacy core competencies for the Certified Volunteer Administrator (CVA) Designation<br />Text:<br />Volunteer Administration: Professional Practice<br />
  3. 3. Leadership<br />
  4. 4. Leadership Defined:<br />The ability of an individual to influence, motivate, and enable other to contribute toward the effectiveness and success of the organization of which they are members. (House, et. al, 1999, p. 184).<br />
  5. 5. Leader vs. Manager<br />Leader:<br />Associated with inspiring or influencing others for the sake of commitment.<br />People-Oriented<br />Personal Power<br />Manager:<br />Associated with hierarchical power and subject’s compliance. <br />Task-Oriented<br />Position Power<br />
  6. 6. Leaders and Power<br />Social Power: a process that entails the leader affecting others/followers in ways that those individuals will respond in favorable ways and engage in beneficial actions that they would probably not do on their own in the absence of the lead<br />
  7. 7. Position Power<br />Legitimate Power: Associated with the position, function or profession (think CVA)<br />Reward Power: Salaries, promotions, recognition<br />Coercive Power: Fire or penalize<br />Information Power: Using, releasing or controlling information from or within the organization<br />
  8. 8. Personal Power<br />Expert Power: Knowledge in specific areas.<br />Referent Power: Followers desire to be associated with people with whom they have developed affective feelings or admiration.<br />
  9. 9. Leaders vs. Leadership<br />Leaders are individuals who are in the position of using the sources of power that are available to them to influence individuals.<br />Leadership is the relationship between a leader and the respective followers and is very much a two-way process. <br />
  10. 10. Leadership Theories<br />Path-Goal Contingency Theory<br />Clarify linkages between performance of the followers to the individual and organizational rewards that result in collective outcomes<br />Charismatic Leadership<br />a two-way relationship that engenders an intense reaction and inspiration on the part of the follower<br />Two views: Socialized or Personalized<br />
  11. 11. Other Leadership Theories*<br />“Great Man” Theory<br />Trait Theory<br />Behavioral Theory<br />Participate Leadership<br />Situational Leadership<br />Contingency Theory<br />Transactional (Management) Leadership<br />Transformational (Relationship) Leadership<br />*These are not discussed in CVA content<br />
  12. 12. Leadership & Cultures<br />Universally endorsed characteristics<br />Charisma and its socialized manifestation<br />Team-oriented leadership <br />Leaders are seen to exhibit charismatic and integrity qualities and build effective teams <br />Some characteristics were consistently viewed as barriers to effective leadership:<br />Self-protective (being a loner and asocial)<br />Malevolent (non-cooperative and irritable)<br />Autocratic (dictatorial)<br />
  13. 13. Organizational <br />
  14. 14. Organizational Management<br />The ability to design and implement policies, processes and structures to align volunteer involvement with the mission and vision of the organization. <br />
  15. 15. Organizational Assessment<br />The systematic process of gathering key information and measures from across the organization to create a picture of how the organization is functioning and performing. <br />
  16. 16. Assessment vs. Evaluation<br />Assessment: gathering key information and measures to identify function and performance.<br />Evaluation: looking at results and determining what should happen next. <br />
  17. 17. Principles for Organizational Assessment<br />Role in Society<br />Governance<br />Planning<br />Transparency & Accountability<br />Fundraising<br />
  18. 18. Principles for Organizational Assessment<br />Financial Management<br />Human Resources<br />Evaluation<br />Strategic Partnerships<br />Civic Engagement and Public Policy<br />
  19. 19. Conducting Volunteer Program Assessments<br />Volunteer Program Scorecard<br />McKinsey Nonprofit Capacity Assessment Grid <br />
  20. 20. Diversity & Inclusion<br />Diversity: full participation by members of many different groups. <br />Inclusion: engaging the uniqueness of the talents, beliefs, backgrounds, capabilities, and ways of living individuals and group when joined in a common endeavor.<br />
  21. 21. Advocacy<br />
  22. 22. Advocacy<br />The ability to advance individual, organizational and community goals, advocating for effective volunteer involvement inside of the organization and in broader community it serves, through the investment of personal integrity, skills and attitudes. (according to CCVA)<br />A deliberate process that has as its objective some sort of change. <br />
  23. 23. Lobbying<br />Lobbying has a call to action to contact policymakers about specific legislation.<br />It can either be:<br />direct (to the legislator or legislative staff)<br />indirect (to the general public with a call to action)<br />
  24. 24. Advocacy Strategy<br />
  25. 25. Types of Advocacy<br />Internal(within the boundaries of the organization):<br />On behalf of others - all volunteers or a particular volunteers<br />On behalf of volunteer management<br />For themselves and for their role in managing the volunteer program<br />External (targeted audience is outside the boundaries of the organization). <br />For the organization or cause beyond the confines of the organization <br />With external partners and the community <br />For the profession of volunteer administration <br />
  26. 26. How do you Advocate?<br />Become knowledgeable.<br />Know the goals/objectives <br />Know the facts and history <br />Know the big pictures, context and options <br />Know the audience<br />Know your values and philosophy<br />
  27. 27. How do you Advocate?<br />Prepare through Research.<br />Research the issues <br />Connect with others in the profession <br />Research the issues, organization or community by connecting with those outside of volunteer management<br />Assess assets and deficits of the larger context, the organization, community or section<br />Critical thinking to integrate all streams of information<br />
  28. 28. How do you Advocate?<br />Practice effective communication skills.<br />Active listening<br />Communicate clearly<br />Know how to use persuasion<br />Adapt your language to that of the audience<br />Be aware, knowledgeable and respectful of cultural differences<br />
  29. 29. How do you Advocate?<br />Prepare through Research.<br />Research the issues <br />Connect with others in the profession <br />Research the issues, organization or community by connecting with those outside of volunteer management<br />Assess assets and deficits of the larger context, the organization, community or section<br />Critical thinking to integrate all streams of information<br />
  30. 30. Questions, Thoughts & Observations?<br />Anthony McAdoo, Ed.D.<br />amcadoo@gmail.com<br />(479) 422-1237<br />

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