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5 Words: Solving Procrastination with Group SMS
5 Words: Solving Procrastination with Group SMS
5 Words: Solving Procrastination with Group SMS
5 Words: Solving Procrastination with Group SMS
5 Words: Solving Procrastination with Group SMS
5 Words: Solving Procrastination with Group SMS
5 Words: Solving Procrastination with Group SMS
5 Words: Solving Procrastination with Group SMS
5 Words: Solving Procrastination with Group SMS
5 Words: Solving Procrastination with Group SMS
5 Words: Solving Procrastination with Group SMS
5 Words: Solving Procrastination with Group SMS
5 Words: Solving Procrastination with Group SMS
5 Words: Solving Procrastination with Group SMS
5 Words: Solving Procrastination with Group SMS
5 Words: Solving Procrastination with Group SMS
5 Words: Solving Procrastination with Group SMS
5 Words: Solving Procrastination with Group SMS
5 Words: Solving Procrastination with Group SMS
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5 Words: Solving Procrastination with Group SMS

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How I got > 70% of college students to review their lecture 3 times on the day it happened with group SMS.

How I got > 70% of college students to review their lecture 3 times on the day it happened with group SMS.

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  • 1. 5 Words: Solving Procrastination with Group SMS<br />Andrew Martin<br />Stanford ‘13<br />T | @amartinsu13<br />
  • 2. Using only this..<br />Andrew Martin – Stanford ‘13<br />
  • 3. I got..<br />[93%] of students to send me a text about their lecture<br />&amp;<br />[73%] of students to vote on their favorite classmate’s text from class<br />Andrew Martin – Stanford ‘13<br />
  • 4. But why?<br />Well, students are generally good at taking notes during lectures..<br />But then we don’t look at the notes until weeks/months later to do homework or cram for the exam!<br />Andrew Martin – Stanford ‘13<br />
  • 5. The Problem:<br />Students create their own stress by cramming for exams, rather than internalizing the material over the quarter. <br />Andrew Martin – Stanford ‘13<br />
  • 6. The 5 Words Solution<br />I want to get students to review their lecture notes [THREE] times on the day of class:<br />First | Right after lecture<br />Second | In the late afternoon<br />Third | At night<br />Andrew Martin – Stanford ‘13<br />
  • 7. How can you possibly get college students to review a lecture 3 times?!? <br />Aren’t they always in a rush? <br />(And isn’t that the original problem?)<br />It’s easy! Just follow 3 tenets of behavior design…<br />Andrew Martin – Stanford ‘13<br />
  • 8. 1) Keep it simple, stupid<br />People are lazy.<br />If you want them to do something time consuming OR<br /> mentally draining OR<br /> physically straining<br />THEY WONT DO IT<br />Andrew Martin – Stanford ‘13<br />
  • 9. 2) Make it social<br />Humans are social <br />creatures. <br />If you get them doing something their friends are doing, they will be more likely to continue doing it.<br />Andrew Martin – Stanford ‘13<br />
  • 10. 3) Make it fun<br />If people aren’t <br />enjoying it, they <br />won’t do it.<br />Use game mechanics: make it a competition<br />Andrew Martin – Stanford ‘13<br />
  • 11. 5 Words: <br />3 Steps<br />to get college students <br />to review lecture <br />3 times a day<br />Andrew Martin – Stanford ‘13<br />
  • 12. Step 1<br />Immediately after class, you’re asked to come up with an interesting insight you learned and to text it to me in 5 words. <br />Why does this work?<br />It is a well-timed hot trigger!<br /> You are texted when you are most able to respond.<br />It is simple!<br /> Who doesn’t have time to text 5 words?<br />Andrew Martin – Stanford ‘13<br />
  • 13. Step 2<br />In the late afternoon, you get a text with your classmate’s 5 words, and are asked to vote on the best insight. <br />Why does this work?<br />It is social!<br /> You get to read all of your classmate’s responses<br />It is simple!<br /> All you have to do is read the text, and respond with a #. Who can’t do that?<br />Andrew Martin – Stanford ‘13<br />
  • 14. Step 3<br />At night, you find out what classmate got the most votes.<br />Why does this work?<br />It is fun!<br /> You compete with your friends for the best insight of the day<br />It is simple!<br /> Who doesn’t have time to read a text?<br />Andrew Martin – Stanford ‘13<br />
  • 15. In my pilot, I had [14] participants for <br />5 days:<br /> 12 students<br /> 1 Professor<br /> 1 TA<br />The Results?!?<br />Andrew Martin – Stanford ‘13<br />
  • 16. Response Rates<br />[93%]<br />24 of 26<br />[73%]<br />19 of 26<br />Andrew Martin – Stanford ‘13<br />
  • 17. Feedback<br />Professor: “As a teacher I like the feedback [from seeing the student’s takeaways from class]”<br />Student (“The Good”): “Yeah I ended up thinking about lecture 3 times because of it”<br />Student (“The Bad”): “It might have helped me retain information more if you asked for a one sentence summary instead of an insight”<br />Andrew Martin – Stanford ‘13<br />
  • 18. Your Takeaways for Texting Interventions<br />1) Keep it simple for the user throughout all steps of your intervention.<br />2) Let your users see other user’s progress. Have them vote on the best user.<br />3) Make it fun. Make it a competition. <br />Andrew Martin – Stanford ‘13<br />
  • 19. Feedback?<br />Contact me (really)!<br />T | @amartinsu13<br />E | amartin6@stanford.edu<br />Andrew Martin – Stanford ‘13<br />

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