Rethinking Our Jobs       Karen Calhoun       Prepared for Library Staff Day       Duquesne University       January 3, 20...
Overview  The traditional service model for   academic libraries is broken  Change is necessary if the library is to   c...
http://www.educationadvisoryboard.com/pdf/23634-EAB-               Redefining-the-Academic-Library.pdfJanuary 2012        ...
“They come and go and drawThe Well        from the well”                           •The Library as a center               ...
The Way We Worked  Books  Journals  Newspapers  Gov docs  Maps  Scores  AV  Dissertations    Library catalogs  Special  co...
The Way We Worked  Books  Journals  Newspapers  Gov docs  Maps  Scores  AV  Dissertations    Library catalogs  Special  co...
Where Do You Begin a Search forInformation on a Topic? (2005)                                   Starting an Information Se...
Where does search begin? (2009-)      Slide from EAB report p. 11 January 2012                  Duquesne Gumberg Library   8
Print Collections Rarely Used  EAB Report p. 49 January 2012        Duquesne Gumberg Library   9
The Catalog in Context •Online catalogs represent one node in the student’s and scholar’s information universe •As informa...
An Eroding Role for Library-Created Metadata:2003-2009  Schonfeld, Roger C., and Ross Housewright. 2010. Faculty survey 20...
Median Circulation and Reference Transactions in ARLLibraries 1991-2008, With Five Year Forecast 400000 350000 300000 2500...
Circulation and reference trends atDuquesne January 2012     Duquesne Gumberg Library   13
What Did Users Say They Want? (2002)  •Faculty and students do more work  and study away from campus                      ...
Expenditure on E-Resources: 2008ARL Average January 2012   Duquesne Gumberg Library   15
Networked E-Resources at Cornell (2005)   About 10% of the collection   36% of the materials budget (2005)   About 50% ...
Size and Usage of Physical and E-Resources atDuquesne (2007-2011) Volumes         710,571 700,245 715,518 721,569 728,587 ...
Some recent news items: Higher educationfunding declines are long-term issues The Washington Post, December 22, 2011. Gues...
Change is necessary     Less money to support the library     Search starts elsewhere; many substitutes for      what th...
Meanwhile …  People are still doing the jobs called for   by the traditional service model  The service model needs to c...
At the Crossroads                                               Alice:                                               Would...
Net Geners and Library Services: ADisconnect      They like                                           We offer         ...
Michael Habib’s Library 2.0                       “Academic Library 2.0 Concept Model,” p. 35.      http://www.flickr.com/...
A multidimensional framework for academic support: a final report submitted to the       Mellon Foundation from the Univer...
Everywhere, the library: Reaching out withits people AND its data               Library as Place                          ...
Exposing Your Collections Where Your UsersLive and Work on the Web                Find in a library January 2012          ...
Linking systems together to increasediscoverability and use January 2012     Duquesne Gumberg Library   27
A New Kind of Library      Build a vision of a new       kind of library      Be more involved with       research and l...
Changes that have been successfulelsewhere  Library space redesign  Liaison librarian model (the “embedded   librarian”)...
Library Space Redesign EAB report p. 48 January 2012       Duquesne Gumberg Library   30
“Box of books” to “learning commons”    EAB report p. 63 January 2012          Duquesne Gumberg Library   31
Liaison librarian model  EAB report p. 66 January 2012        Duquesne Gumberg Library   32
Position Description Framework            http://www.arl.org/bm~doc/rli-265-williams.pdf January 2012                    D...
EAB report p. 71January 2012       Duquesne Gumberg Library   34
EAB report p. 75January 2012           Duquesne Gumberg Library   35
Streamlining operations EAB report p. 67 January 2012       Duquesne Gumberg Library   36
Some Technical Services WorkflowRedesign Principles      Look at the whole process (e.g., selection to ordering       to ...
Collaboration and ConsolidatingSystems                 Orbis Cascade: 37 academic libraries in                 Oregon, Was...
Cooperatively Managing Print Collections    EAB report p. 59 January 2012          Duquesne Gumberg Library   39
A Process for Enabling Change   Inclusive planning process   Design team   Environmental scan   Stakeholder analysis  ...
What is a design team and what dothey do?  •    A group of people responsible for translating a vision into       operatio...
A process for developing strategicrecommendations  1. Review your long range plan, vision, mission  2. Consider: What are ...
To get started, consider a possiblescenario, for example:  What would you do if the library was   asked to reduce staffin...
Thank You!     Karen Calhoun     AUL Organizational Development and      Strategic Initiatives     ULS, University of P...
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Rethinking Our Jobs: Toward a New Kind of Academic Library

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Invited presentation for Library Staff Day at Duquesne University, 3 January 2012. Makes a case for change in academic libraries; recommends changes and a process for enabling change. Cites a 2011 Education Advisory Board report and other evidence to support new strategies and new types of jobs for librarians and staff.

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Rethinking Our Jobs: Toward a New Kind of Academic Library

  1. 1. Rethinking Our Jobs Karen Calhoun Prepared for Library Staff Day Duquesne University January 3, 2012January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 1
  2. 2. Overview  The traditional service model for academic libraries is broken  Change is necessary if the library is to continue to be relevant and funded  Changes that have been successful at other academic libraries  A process for enabling change in library services and jobsJanuary 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 2
  3. 3. http://www.educationadvisoryboard.com/pdf/23634-EAB- Redefining-the-Academic-Library.pdfJanuary 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 3
  4. 4. “They come and go and drawThe Well from the well” •The Library as a center of collections •The Library as a center of experts and tools to guide users to appropriate resourcesJanuary 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 4
  5. 5. The Way We Worked Books Journals Newspapers Gov docs Maps Scores AV Dissertations Library catalogs Special collections Manuscripts Papers Univ records Special Coll/Archives Journal articles Conference proceedings Etc. Abstracting & Indexing servicesJanuary 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 5
  6. 6. The Way We Worked Books Journals Newspapers Gov docs Maps Scores AV Dissertations Library catalogs Special collections Manuscripts Papers Univ records Special Coll/Archives Journal articles Conference proceedings Etc. Abstracting & Indexing servicesJanuary 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 6
  7. 7. Where Do You Begin a Search forInformation on a Topic? (2005) Starting an Information Search 100 89 80 Percent 60 40 20 2 0 Search engine Library Web site Where Search Begins College Students’ Perceptions of Libraries and Information Resources: a Report to the OCLC Membership: http://www.oclc.org/reports/perceptionscollege.htm January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 7
  8. 8. Where does search begin? (2009-) Slide from EAB report p. 11 January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 8
  9. 9. Print Collections Rarely Used EAB Report p. 49 January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 9
  10. 10. The Catalog in Context •Online catalogs represent one node in the student’s and scholar’s information universe •As information systems, catalogs are hard to use http://www.loc.gov/catdir/calhoun-report-final.pdf Calhoun, Karen. 2006. The changing nature of the catalog and its integration with other discovery tools. January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 10
  11. 11. An Eroding Role for Library-Created Metadata:2003-2009 Schonfeld, Roger C., and Ross Housewright. 2010. Faculty survey 2009 :key strategic insights for libraries, publishers, and societies. [United States]: Ithaka S + R, p. 5 Available: http://www.ithaka.org/ithaka-s-r/research/faculty-surveys-2000-2009/faculty-survey-2009 January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 11
  12. 12. Median Circulation and Reference Transactions in ARLLibraries 1991-2008, With Five Year Forecast 400000 350000 300000 250000 Circulation 200000 Reference Transactions Linear (Circulation) 150000 Linear (Reference Transactions) 100000 50000 0 Data source: ARL Statistics 2007-2008 http://www.arl.org/bm~doc/arlstat08.pdf January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 12
  13. 13. Circulation and reference trends atDuquesne January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 13
  14. 14. What Did Users Say They Want? (2002) •Faculty and students do more work and study away from campus Do you use electronic sources all of the time, most of the time, some of the time, or none of the •Loyal to the library, but library is time? only one element in complex information structure 60% 50% •Print still important, but almost 40% Percent Faculty/Graduate half of undergraduates say they rely 30% Undergrad exclusively or almost exclusively on 20% 10% electronic materials 0% •Seamless linking from one All of the Some of the None of the time/most of time time information object to another is the time expected Responses •Fast forward to 2012: these trends many times stronger! http://www.clir.org/PUBS/reports/pub110/contents.html January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 14
  15. 15. Expenditure on E-Resources: 2008ARL Average January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 15
  16. 16. Networked E-Resources at Cornell (2005)  About 10% of the collection  36% of the materials budget (2005)  About 50% of the use January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 16
  17. 17. Size and Usage of Physical and E-Resources atDuquesne (2007-2011) Volumes 710,571 700,245 715,518 721,569 728,587 Circulation of Materials 84,945 83,077 81,154 77,544 73,265 E-Journal Titles 30,525 30,980 31,060 77,747 87,441 E-Articles Accessed 1,049,728 1,287,560 2,109,457 4,853,275 4,164,211 January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 17
  18. 18. Some recent news items: Higher educationfunding declines are long-term issues The Washington Post, December 22, 2011. Guest post: 8 thoughts on higher education in 2012: “Many of our current challenges are long-term and will, if anything, become more serious”— • Funding cuts • Practical cap on tuition hikes Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, December 17, 2011. “Duquesne University has offered voluntary buyouts to nearly a fifth of its faculty and staff in the face of expected revenue declines from decreasing enrollment.” There is ample reason to expect HE funding shortfalls to affect library budgets unfavorably. January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 18
  19. 19. Change is necessary  Less money to support the library  Search starts elsewhere; many substitutes for what the library offers  Of what does get used:  Seemingly unquenchable demand for e-resources  Physical collections rarely used  Use of traditional collection-based services in decline (the catalog, reference services)  Traditional academic library service model is less relevant every day and has a dim future January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 19
  20. 20. Meanwhile …  People are still doing the jobs called for by the traditional service model  The service model needs to change  The jobs need to changeJanuary 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 20
  21. 21. At the Crossroads Alice: Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?‘ That depends a good deal on where you want to get to, said the Cat. Illustration: John Tenniel, Alice in Wonderland. Public domain. January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 21
  22. 22. Net Geners and Library Services: ADisconnect  They like  We offer  Multimedia  Text-based environments environments  Figuring things out for  Systems that require themselves prior understanding (or  Working in groups librarian help)  Multitasking  Services for individual  Learning directly use related to courses  Focus, logical sequence  Catalogs, databases, Joan Lippincott, Coalition for Networked Information. In subject guides and Educating the Net Generation pathfinders January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 22
  23. 23. Michael Habib’s Library 2.0 “Academic Library 2.0 Concept Model,” p. 35. http://www.flickr.com/photos/habibmi/318027173/in/set-72157594247454511 January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 23
  24. 24. A multidimensional framework for academic support: a final report submitted to the Mellon Foundation from the University of Minnesota Libraries, June 2006, p. 47. http://www.lib.umn.edu/about/mellon/docs.phtmlJanuary 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 24
  25. 25. Everywhere, the library: Reaching out withits people AND its data Library as Place Place as Library Gumberg Library Photo: Public domainJanuary 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 25
  26. 26. Exposing Your Collections Where Your UsersLive and Work on the Web Find in a library January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 26
  27. 27. Linking systems together to increasediscoverability and use January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 27
  28. 28. A New Kind of Library  Build a vision of a new kind of library  Be more involved with research and learning materials and systems  Be more engaged with campus communities  Make library collections and librarians more visible  Move to next generation systems and services Embedding the library in the knowledge community January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 28
  29. 29. Changes that have been successfulelsewhere  Library space redesign  Liaison librarian model (the “embedded librarian”)  Streamlining operations  Combining public service points  Technical services workflow redesign  Collaboration and partnerships January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 29
  30. 30. Library Space Redesign EAB report p. 48 January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 30
  31. 31. “Box of books” to “learning commons” EAB report p. 63 January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 31
  32. 32. Liaison librarian model EAB report p. 66 January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 32
  33. 33. Position Description Framework http://www.arl.org/bm~doc/rli-265-williams.pdf January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 33
  34. 34. EAB report p. 71January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 34
  35. 35. EAB report p. 75January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 35
  36. 36. Streamlining operations EAB report p. 67 January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 36
  37. 37. Some Technical Services WorkflowRedesign Principles  Look at the whole process (e.g., selection to ordering to receipt to cataloging to shelf-ready)  To the greatest extent possible, handle items and records only once  Capture bibliographic data as far upstream as possible (at point of selection/ordering if you can)  Perform work where it makes the most sense  Maximize acquisitions/cataloging collaboration  Maximize use of support staff and students  Wholly manual processes do not scale; integrate automated and manual operations January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 37
  38. 38. Collaboration and ConsolidatingSystems Orbis Cascade: 37 academic libraries in Oregon, Washington and Idaho Strategies: • Combined collections • Shared library system, shared discovery system • Cooperative collection development • Collaborative technical services • Combined digital archives • Shared expertise • Professional development January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 38
  39. 39. Cooperatively Managing Print Collections EAB report p. 59 January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 39
  40. 40. A Process for Enabling Change  Inclusive planning process  Design team  Environmental scan  Stakeholder analysis  Recommendations  Review; build support  Implement January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 40
  41. 41. What is a design team and what dothey do? • A group of people responsible for translating a vision into operational (actionable) terms • They articulate a clear picture of a desired future state – what it is really going to look like – by providing a blueprint for the organization • Members are selected for their expertise, ability to influence and work with others, knowledge of the organization and its processes • Concerned with (1) getting from ideas to actual, specific activities and (2) questions like: • What new services should be delivered? • What will changed processes look like? • What will our new organizational structures look like? • How will technology be used? • What roles or responsibilities with people have? • How will people relate to the communities that we serve? January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 41
  42. 42. A process for developing strategicrecommendations 1. Review your long range plan, vision, mission 2. Consider: What are the most important problems to be solved or barriers to be removed at your library? 3. Conduct environmental scan – what are your peers doing? What is the current professional thinking? What are best practices? 4. Review any local constraints or ‘givens’ 5. Conduct a stakeholder analysis 6. Conduct something like a “Future Search” conference 7. Define an ideal future state by asking (for example):  What new or changed services need to be provided?  What should renovated spaces look like?  What will new or changed organizational structures look like?  What types of key roles or responsibilities will people have?  How will people relate to the communities that the library serves?  What new or changed technologies will be used? 8. Re-evaluate constraints, givens, stakeholder analysis 9. Recommend strategic actions for making progress toward the ideal future state in operational, executable termsThroughout the process: COMMUNICATE COMMUNICATE COMMUNICATE January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 42
  43. 43. To get started, consider a possiblescenario, for example:  What would you do if the library was asked to reduce staffing levels by 20% in two years?  In four years? January 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 43
  44. 44. Thank You!  Karen Calhoun  AUL Organizational Development and Strategic Initiatives  ULS, University of Pittsburgh  ksc34@pitt.eduJanuary 2012 Duquesne Gumberg Library 44
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