Analytics with Purpose Data Visualization Gallery

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Analytics with Purpose Data Visualization Gallery

  1. 1. John Nelson John Nelson IDV Solutions john.nelson@idvsolutions.com @JohnNelsonIDV Major Fires Since 2001 Each dot represents a moment of pretty extreme heat; down to the one square kilometer level (creator only retained fires greater than 100KW MW and of those only fires that the system was more than 50% confident of). Theyve been colored and scaled by "units" of the typical American nuclear power plants summertime capacity to provide some sort of baseline of the fires magnitude. There are a couple temporal charts in there, too. The seasonal curve the creator would expect, but the overall upwards trend was interesting.
  2. 2. Bloomberg Visual DataJohn Nelson
  3. 3. John Nelson John Nelson IDV Solutions john.nelson@idvsolutions.com @JohnNelsonIDV Earthquakes since 1898 The creator has been looking at general sources of existential risk and visualizing them via the kitchen sink school of thematic mapping. So the earthquakes map was just a matter of time. Here, data from NCEDC.org and the USGS and UC Berkeley have been sliced out into veneers based on magnitude, then glued onto and image that began its life at NASAs Visual Earth and wrung into the Times projection (centered at the interesting bits). The result looks an awful lot like a fleet of Nickelodeon tankers spilled the worlds supply of floam.
  4. 4. Bloomberg Visual Data John Nelson
  5. 5. Weber Schandwick Weber Shandwick go@gobieta.com 612.723.7424 Gerardo Obieta - ART DIRECTION AND DESIGN - Weber Shandwick Funeral costs are going up, as are other expenses related to death. This infographic shows the increase in rates and overall costs.
  6. 6. Bloomberg Visual Data Weber Schandwick
  7. 7. Bloomberg Visual Data Weber Schandwick
  8. 8. Bloomberg Visual Data Weber Schandwick
  9. 9. Weber Schandwick Weber Shandwick go@gobieta.com 612.723.7424 • Gerardo Obieta - ART DIRECTION AND DESIGN - Weber Shandwick • Anna Evenson - PROJECT MANAGER - Weber Shandwick • Angela Role - ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE - Weber Shandwick • Doug Hamlin - SOCIAL MEDIA STRATEGIST - Weber Shandwick This infographic displays the impact social media reports the U.S. Army and its Army Strong Stories program is generating. ArmyStrongStories.com is the Armys premier community for Soldiers of all ranks and Army careers as well as Army supporters to share their meanings of Army Strong.
  10. 10. Bloomberg Visual Data Weber Schandwick
  11. 11. Bloomberg Visual Data Weber Schandwick
  12. 12. Bloomberg Visual Data Weber Schandwick
  13. 13. Weber Schandwick Weber Shandwick go@gobieta.com 612.723.7424 Gerardo Obieta - ART DIRECTION AND DESIGN - Weber Shandwick This infographic shows how credit card companies make money and how they manage to stay in business.
  14. 14. Bloomberg Visual Data Weber Schandwick
  15. 15. Bloomberg Visual Data Weber Schandwick
  16. 16. Arthur Buxton Vogue magazine covers are the ideal barometer for measuring color trends in popular culture. Within each piece the small bar charts show the five most prominent colors, proportionally, in an individual Vogue cover. Each column is a year starting with September and working down to October at the bottom. The columns run from 1981 on the right working across to 2011 on the left. After viewing the work one becomes increasingly a where of the differences in overall national color palettes. The most striking trend is the recent preference for paler colors, which is evident on all three charts. Seasonal trends are more subtle. Gaps occur where covers are unavailable. Aside from seasonality and longer term changes in color trends, other, more quantitative data is evidenced. By looking at ‘Paris Vogue Covers 1981 - 2011’ we can see a sudden change in tones which occurs in late 1987. Colombe Pringle became the magazines editor- in-chief in December 1987. The colours undergo a sudden change again in 1994 when Joan Juliet Buck, an American, was named Pringles successor’. More at arthurbuxton.com, including how to purchase limited edition art prints of Arthurs work
  17. 17. Arthur Buxton Color Trend VisualizationTimelines
  18. 18. Arthur Buxton Color Trend VisualizationTimelines
  19. 19. Arthur Buxton Color Trend VisualizationTimelines
  20. 20. Arthur Buxton Color Trend VisualizationTimelines
  21. 21. Bill Rankin Bill Rankin Radical Cartography bill@radicalcartography.net Tropical Cyclones, 1945–2006. Data from the Joint Typhoon Warning Center and the U.S. National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration.
  22. 22. Bill RankinBill Rankin, Radical Cartography
  23. 23. Bill Rankin Bill Rankin Radical Cartography bill@radicalcartography.net Frequency of lightning strikes throughout the world, based on data from NASA.
  24. 24. Bill RankinBill Rankin, Radical Cartography
  25. 25. Background Stories Background Stories www.backgrountstories.com Arlene Birt, Visual Storyteller arlene@arlenebirt.com or 612.246.4234 Bicycling Counts Inspired to celebrate the savings of bicycling, this traveling installation visualizes each passing cyclist in terms of individual and collective environmental benefits.
  26. 26. Bill RankinBackground Stories
  27. 27. Bill RankinBackground Stories
  28. 28. Bill RankinBackground Stories
  29. 29. Bill RankinBackground Stories
  30. 30. Bloomberg Visual Data Bloomberg bloomberg.com/billionaires Visual Data Team Contributors: • Lisa Strausfeld, Global Head of Data Visualization • Hilla Katki, Design Director Chris Cannon, Senior Designer • Kenton Powell, Designer - kenton@kentonpowell.com • Jeremy Diamond, Interaction Designer • Zach Schwartz, User Experience Prototyper • Alia Shafir, Project Manager • Illustrations by Lina Chen The Bloomberg Billionaires Index is a daily ranking of the worlds richest people. In calculating net worth, Bloomberg News strives to provide the most transparent calculations available. Each Bloomberg Billionaires profile contains a detailed analysis of how that persons fortune has been tallied.
  31. 31. Bloomberg Visual Data Bloomberg Visual Data
  32. 32. Bloomberg Visual Data Bloomberg Visual Data
  33. 33. Bloomberg Visual Data Bloomberg Visual Data
  34. 34. Chris Harrison & Christoph Römhild Chris Harrison & Christoph Römhild chris.harrison@cs.cmu.edu The bar graph that runs along the bottom represents all of the chapters in the Bible. Books alternate in color between white and light gray. The length of each bar denotes the number of verses in the chapter. Each of the 63,779 cross references found in the Bible is depicted by a single arc - the color corresponds to the distance between the two chapters, creating a rainbow-like effect.
  35. 35. Bloomberg Visual Data Chris Harrison & Christoph Römhild
  36. 36. Hyperakt Hyperakt deroy@hyperakt.com 718-855-4250 Deroy Peraza, Principal + Creative Director Google: Evolution To visually represent the interaction between web technologies and browsers, which power the web apps that we use daily. Hyperakt Credits: Deroy Peraza, Eric Fensterheim, Margaux Le Pierres
  37. 37. Bloomberg Visual Data Hyperakt
  38. 38. Bloomberg Visual Data Hyperakt
  39. 39. Bloomberg Visual Data Hyperakt
  40. 40. Bloomberg Visual Data Hyperakt
  41. 41. Jessica Draws Jessica Draws http://jessicadraws.com Jessica@jessicadraws.com 07540282420 A commission from http://chinablueprint-online.com/ to advertise the benefits of using Chinese social media for Australian Businesses.
  42. 42. Bloomberg Visual Data + = Jessica Draws
  43. 43. Mintz Group Mintz Group www.mintzgroup.com James Mintz, President jmintz@mintzgroup.com 212.489.7100 This map pinpoints the location of bribes paid to foreign government officials that led to U.S. government penalties. The darker red that a country appears, the larger the total penalties assessed for Foreign Corrupt Practices Act violations in that country. An interactive version is available online at www.fcpamap.com.
  44. 44. Bloomberg Visual DataMintz Group
  45. 45. Bloomberg Visual DataMintz Group
  46. 46. Periscopic Periscopic www.periscopic.com kim@periscopic.com 503-295-7946 Contributors: Kim Rees, Dino Citraro, Mark Hintz, Katie Hill, Emma Alterman, Brett Johnson, Jacob O’Brien, Earl Swigert U.S. Gun Killings in 2010 We wanted to show the huge loss of potential when guns are used in violence in America.
  47. 47. Bloomberg Visual DataPeriscopic
  48. 48. Bloomberg Visual DataPeriscopic
  49. 49. Bloomberg Visual DataPeriscopic
  50. 50. Bloomberg Visual DataPeriscopic
  51. 51. Bloomberg Visual DataPeriscopic
  52. 52. Rolando Salazar Rolando Salazar, Art Director / Motion Designer rolando36@gmail.com 201-937-8588 The client, Netmining, wanted to visualize the website categories that showed significant traffic increase after Hurricane Sandy. Client: Netmining, Lynda Liu, Marketing Manager http://www.netmining.com/
  53. 53. Bloomberg Visual DataRolando Salazar
  54. 54. Zoe Fraade-BlanarZoe Fraade-BlanarFraade@gmail.com410-419-8183Names of all contributors: Zoe Fraade-Blanar, Kevin Webb, AaronGlazer, John Keefe, Lev SteshenkoHey TaxiVolume of taxi rides in Manhattan on an average Tuesday at4PM, during March 2009. Data is based on a record of GPS-taggedtaxi rides.
  55. 55. Bloomberg Visual DataZoe Fraade-Blanar
  56. 56. goGeogoGeoAdam Cohen, President, Cartifactadam@cartifact-union.comDan Deloronzo, Product Manager, Union LLCGraham Marrott, Cartifact-UniongoGeo combs the universe of live financial data to produce the firstdynamic global mapping system geared towards market makers.• Live performance updates for every economy with a stock market in a unique choropleth map visualization• Advance intelligence on upcoming earnings reports and data releases• News heat tracking of more than 2,500 of the world’s most important companies
  57. 57. Bloomberg Visual DatagoGeo
  58. 58. Bloomberg Visual DatagoGeo
  59. 59. Bloomberg Visual DatagoGeo
  60. 60. Bloomberg Visual DatagoGeo
  61. 61. Bloomberg Visual DatagoGeo
  62. 62. THE LUXURY OF PROTESTTHE LUXURY OF PROTESTPeter Crnokrakinfo@theluxuryofprotest.comhttp://theluxuryofprotest.comNEVER FOREVER NEVER FOR NOWThis is a quantitative visualization of the transient nature of empire. The visualization graphsall known empires, colonies and territorial occupations from 2334 BCE to the present day.Each empire occupies a slice of the pie graph with a known start (+) and end (×) date. Eachslice is assigned a transparency value of 10% allowing for concurrent empires to bevisualized – the more empires that occupy the same period of time in history, the whiter thegraph. As history progresses, humankind’s competition for wealth, resources and therelentless drive toward conquest and occupation can be clearly seen in the graph.The data shows an accelerating trend toward greater and greater conquest of territory andgreater and greater competition amongst imperial powers. The graph starts relatively light(top right portion of graph) as early cultures maintain territory that can be consideredindigenous. With time, cultures encroach upon one another as shown in the heavy whiteareas to the left of the graph (representing 900 CE to 1900 CE).
  63. 63. Bloomberg Visual DataTHE LUXURY OF PROTEST
  64. 64. Bloomberg Visual DataTHE LUXURY OF PROTEST
  65. 65. Bloomberg Visual DataTHE LUXURY OF PROTEST
  66. 66. Bloomberg Visual DataTHE LUXURY OF PROTEST
  67. 67. THE LUXURY OF PROTESTTHE LUXURY OF PROTESTPeter Crnokrakinfo@theluxuryofprotest.comhttp://theluxuryofprotest.comEVERYONE EVER IN THE WORLDEveryone Ever in the World is a visual representation of the number of people tohave lived versus been killed in wars, massacres and genocide during the recordedhistory of humankind. The visualization uses existing paper area and paper loss(die cut circle) to represent the concepts of life and death respectively. The totalnumber of people to have lived was estimated through exponential regressioncalculations based on historical census data.The sequence of dots to the top left of the graph shows the dramatic increase inthe number of conflicts over the past 5 millennia (left to right : 3000 BCE to 2000CE) with the most recent 1000 years being the most violent. The large dot belowthe graph represents the 1000 years to come: a predicted startling increase in thefrequency of human conflict.
  68. 68. Bloomberg Visual DataTHE LUXURY OF PROTEST
  69. 69. THE LUXURY OF PROTESTTHE LUXURY OF PROTESTPeter Crnokrakinfo@theluxuryofprotest.comhttp://theluxuryofprotest.comEVERYONE EVER IN THE WORLDEveryone Ever in the World is a visual representation of the number of people to have livedversus been killed in wars, massacres and genocide during the recorded history ofhumankind. The visualization uses existing paper area and paper loss (die cut circle) torepresent the concepts of life and death respectively. The total number of people to havelived was estimated through exponential regression calculations based on historical censusdata.The commemorative Science edition – the 3rd and final print of “Everyone Ever...” – isentirely laser engraved and laser cut in heavy cotton paper. Laser engraving produces adistinctive burn pattern with subtle smoke-like wisps that are particularly pronounced onwhite paper. Being a subtractive process, engraving is a perfect process to convey the notionof loss. The burn patterns also convey the concept of inferno which is in and ofitself, inextricably linked to destruction and death.
  70. 70. Bloomberg Visual DataTHE LUXURY OF PROTEST
  71. 71. Bloomberg Visual DataTHE LUXURY OF PROTEST
  72. 72. THE LUXURY OF PROTESTTHE LUXURY OF PROTESTPeter Crnokrakinfo@theluxuryofprotest.comhttp://theluxuryofprotest.comEVERYONE EVER IN THE WORLDEveryone Ever in the World is a visual representation of the number of people to have livedversus been killed in wars, massacres and genocide during the recorded history ofhumankind. The visualization uses existing paper area and paper loss (die cut circle) torepresent the concepts of life and death respectively. The total number of people to havelived was estimated through exponential regression calculations based on historical censusdata.As a contrast to the heaviness of the first “black” edition (which in itself has a directsymbolic relationship to the void of death), the second edition printed on frosted semi-clearplastic takes on a ghost-like transparency to express the same concept, but usingdiametrically opposite language. The fundamental relationship of poster area to die cut arearemains, but the lightness of the milk-white ink on semi-clear plastic to a nod to the fleetingnature of existence and the symbolism of loss – that life disappears as easily as it is created.
  73. 73. Bloomberg Visual DataTHE LUXURY OF PROTEST

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