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Sale of Goods Act, 1930                Pradeep                Singha                DSBS
History    • Sale of goods act was enacted in 1930.     Borrowed from the English act.     Came into force in July, 1930.2
Definition Sec 4(1) of the Indian Sale of Goods Act, 1930  defines the contract of he sale of goods in the  following man...
The term ―Contract of sale of goods‘ is a generic term and it includes:  a. Sale and  b. An agreement to sell  where the s...
Definitions     ‗Buyer‘ -- a person who buys or agrees to buy     goods     ‗Delivery‘ – voluntary transfer of possessio...
Contd/-     ‗Fault‘ -- means wrongful act or default     ‗Future goods‘ -- means goods to be     manufactured or produce...
Contd/-    • A person is said to be "insolvent" who has ceased     to pay his debts in the ordinary course of     business...
Contd/-    • ―Property" means the general property in     goods, and not merely a special property    • ―Quality of goods"...
Contd/-    • Expressions used but not defined in this Act and     defined in the Indian Contract Act, 1872, have the     m...
ESSENTAILS OF A CONTRACT OFSALEIn a contract of sale, there should be:  a.   A contract  b.   Between the two parties (i.e...
FORMATION OF THE CONTRACT
CONTRACT OF SALE    Sale and agreement to sell :• Its is a contract whereby the seller transfers or agrees to transfer    ...
CONTRACT OF SALE (Contd) An agreement to sell becomes a sale  when the time elapses or the conditions  are fulfilled subj...
Formalities of ContractContract of sale made A contract of sale is made by an offer to buy or sell goods for   a price an...
Subject-matter of ContractExisting or future goods:•   The goods which form the subject of a contract of sale may be    ei...
Goods perishing before making of contract: Where there is a contract-for the sale of specific goods, it‘s void if the good...
The PriceAscertainment of price:•   The price in a contract of sale may be fixed by the contract or    may be left to be f...
Relevant Case  Ganganagar Sugar Mills Ltd. Vs. Rameshwar Das Tara   Chand AIR 1992 Raj 14     Sugar in specific quantity ...
Agreement to sell at valuation:•   Where there is an agreement to sell goods on the terms that    the price is to be fixed...
CONDITIONS AND WARRANTIES
CONDITIONS A condition is a basic and important part of the contract. If one party breaches a condition then the other p...
WARRANTIES On the other hand, a warranty is not vital to the contract. If one party breaches a warranty then the other p...
IMPLIED UNDERTAKING              RIGHT TO TITLE(section 14) Seller has the right to sell. The buyer shall have and enjoy...
Relevant CaseUnited India Insurance vs. Kanchan Bai. AIR 1981 MP 225 A truck involved in an accident was sold   to anothe...
Sale by description• Impose obligation on seller and manufacturer where  sale made in course of business.• Where the purch...
Description with examination• Where goods are bought by description from a seller who deals in goods of that description (...
Implied conditions                        Section 16 Implied conditions as to fitness for purpose   – goods must be reaso...
SALE BY SAMPLEIn the case of a contract for sale by sample there is an  implied condition—  • (a) that the bulk shall corr...
Remedies for breach of contract ofsale For unpaid seller   has not received full payment     has rights against goods, ...
Remedies for breach of contract ofsale For buyer   purchaser of goods from seller   has rights against seller where sel...
Buyer beware CAVEAT EMPTOR- a buyer buys at his own risk. Now we have consumer protection act (1986)
EFFECTS OF CONTRACT
Transfer of Property between Buyerand Seller1.       Goods must be ascertained-         No property in the goods is transf...
Relevant Case•   Abdul Aziz vs. Jogendra Krishna Roy,(1917)    ILR 44 Cal 98       The sale had taken place, but still th...
3.Specific goods in a deliverable state   In such a case, property passes to the buyer when   contract is made, irrespect...
5.Sale of unascertained goods & appropriation  Where there is sale of unascertained goods and goods   of that description...
6.Goods sent on approval or ―on sale or return‖In such cases, property passes to the buyer –    When he signifies approva...
Risk prima facie passes withproperty When property in the goods is transferred to the buyer, the goods are at the buyer‘s ...
Relevant CaseDigambar Pershad Kirti Prasad vs. State of UP,(1996) All LJ 158 Auction of a forest knocked down to highest ...
Transfer of title1.Sale by person not the owner  In case a person, who is not the owner of the  goods, sells them thereof ...
Relevant CaseState of M.P vs. G.L Patel & Co. AIR 1997 MP 74   Auction of forest produce to be sanctioned for final   app...
2.Sale by one of joint owners   If one of several joint owners of goods has sole   possession of them by permission of the...
3.Sale by person in possession of goods under voidable  contract     When the seller has obtained possession under a contr...
• Also where a person, having bought or agreed to buy goods, obtains possession of the goods or documents of title, and su...
Performance of the contract
Seller and Buyer Duty of seller to deliver the goods Duty of buyer to accept and pay for them
Delivery Payment and delivery are concurrent conditions   Seller willing to give possession of the goods to the buyer in...
Effects of Part Delivery A delivery of part of goods, in progress of the  delivery of the whole, has the same effect, for...
Buyer to apply for delivery Apart from any express contract, the seller of goods is not bound to deliver them until the b...
Rules as to delivery(1)Question depending in each case on the  contract, express or implied, between the parties.  Apart f...
(2) Where under the contract of sale the seller is   bound to send the goods to the buyer, but no   time for sending them ...
Rules as to Delivery Contd…(4) Demand or tender of delivery may be treated as  ineffectual unless made at a reasonable hou...
Delivery of wrong quantity Short Delivery - Where the seller delivers to the buyer a lesser quantity of goods, the buyer ...
 Delivery of Mixed Goods - Where the seller delivers to the buyer the goods he contracted to sell mixed with goods of a d...
Delivery to carrier Where, in pursuance of a contract of sale the seller is   authorized or required to send the goods to...
 Unless otherwise agreed, where goods are sent by the seller to the buyer by a route involving sea transit, in circumstan...
Buyer‘s Right   Mayank Rai   Roll No. 381
Buyers right of examining the goods Where goods are delivered to the buyer which he has not previously examined, he is no...
Acceptance The buyer is deemed to have accepted the goods when he intimates to the seller that he has accepted them, or w...
Rejection of GoodsBuyer not bound to return rejected goods Unless otherwise agreed, where goods are delivered to the  buy...
Relevant Case   National Small Industries Corporation Limited vs.  Ramchandra Raghunath Joshi, (1995) ALHC  400(Bom): (199...
Rights of the Unpaid Seller           Mohit Jain          Roll No. 326
RIGHTS OF THE UNPAID SELLER AGAINST THE                GOODSDEFINITION: UNPAID SELLERa)   when the whole of the price has ...
SELLERThe term "seller" includes any person who is inthe position of a seller, as, for instance, an agentof the seller to ...
Unpaid sellers rights a lien on the goods for the price while he is in  possession of them in case of the insolvency of ...
Unpaid sellers lien Sellers lien. Part delivery. Termination of lien.             Stoppage in transit• Right of stoppag...
Transfer by buyer and seller Effect of sub-sale or pledge by buyer Sale not generally rescinded by lien or stoppage in t...
SUITS FOR BREACH OF THE       CONTRACT    Mandeep Singh Grover        Roll No. 317
Suits for Breach of the Contract Seller‘s Remedies Against Buyer   Suit for Price   Damages for non-acceptance Buyer‘s...
Suit for price•   Where under a contract of sale the property in the goods has passed    to the buyer and the buyer wrongf...
Damages for non-acceptance Where the buyer wrongfully neglects or refuses  to accept and pay for the goods, the seller ma...
Damages for non-delivery Where the seller wrongfully neglects or refuses  to deliver the goods to the buyer, the buyer ma...
Specific performance•    Subject to the provisions of Chapter II of the Specific Relief    Act, 1877 (1 of 1877), in any s...
Remedy for breach of warranty•    Where there is a breach of warranty by the seller, or where    the buyer elects or is co...
Repudiation of contract before duedate Where either party to a contract of sale repudiates  the contract before the date ...
Interest by way of damages andspecial damages Nothing in this act shall affect the right of the  seller or the buyer to r...
Special Damages &  Miscellaneous    Saurabh Natu    Roll No. 343
Interest by way of damages and special    damages•     Nothing in this Act shall affect the right of the seller or the buy...
Miscellaneous Exclusion of Implied Terms and Conditions   By Express Contract   Course of Dealing   Trade Usage Reaso...
Miscellaneous Auction Sale   Right to Impose Conditions   Formation of Ring or Knock Out   Bidder‘s right to withdraw ...
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  1. 1. Sale of Goods Act, 1930 Pradeep Singha DSBS
  2. 2. History • Sale of goods act was enacted in 1930.  Borrowed from the English act.  Came into force in July, 1930.2
  3. 3. Definition Sec 4(1) of the Indian Sale of Goods Act, 1930 defines the contract of he sale of goods in the following manner: ― A contract of sale of goods is a contract whereby the seller transfers or agrees to transfer the property in goods to the buyer for a price”.
  4. 4. The term ―Contract of sale of goods‘ is a generic term and it includes: a. Sale and b. An agreement to sell where the seller transfers the ownership rights to the buyer immediately on making the contract, it is the contract of sale, but where the ownership rights are to pass on some future date upon the fulfillment of certain conditions then it is called an agreement to sell.
  5. 5. Definitions  ‗Buyer‘ -- a person who buys or agrees to buy goods  ‗Delivery‘ – voluntary transfer of possession from one person to the other  Goods are said to be in ‗deliverable state‘ when the buyer under the contract is bound to take their delivery  Caveat emptor i.e let the buyer beware is universally applicable as far as quality is5 concerned.
  6. 6. Contd/-  ‗Fault‘ -- means wrongful act or default  ‗Future goods‘ -- means goods to be manufactured or produced or acquired by the seller after the making of the contract of sale  ‗Goods‘ -- means every kind of movable property other than actionable claims and money; and includes stock and shares, growing crops, grass, and things attached to or forming part of the land which are agreed to be severed before sale or under the contract of sale6
  7. 7. Contd/- • A person is said to be "insolvent" who has ceased to pay his debts in the ordinary course of business, or cannot pay his debts as they become due, whether he has committed an act of insolvency or not • ―Mercantile agent" means a mercantile agent having in the customary course of business as such agent authority either to sell goods, or to consign goods for the purposes of sale, or to buy goods, or to raise money on the security of goods7 • ―Price" means the money consideration for a sale
  8. 8. Contd/- • ―Property" means the general property in goods, and not merely a special property • ―Quality of goods" includes their state or condition • ―Seller" means a person who sells or agrees to sell goods • ―Specific goods" means goods identified and8 agreed upon at the time a contract of sale is
  9. 9. Contd/- • Expressions used but not defined in this Act and defined in the Indian Contract Act, 1872, have the meanings assigned to them in that Act. Application of provisions of Act 9 of 1872. • The unrepealed provisions of the Indian Contract Act, 1872, save in so far as they are inconsistent with the express provisions of this Act, shall continue to apply to contracts for the sale of goods.9
  10. 10. ESSENTAILS OF A CONTRACT OFSALEIn a contract of sale, there should be: a. A contract b. Between the two parties (i.e. the buyer and the seller) c. To transfer or agree to transfer, d. The property in goods e. From the seller to the buyer, f. for a price (i.e money in consideration)
  11. 11. FORMATION OF THE CONTRACT
  12. 12. CONTRACT OF SALE Sale and agreement to sell :• Its is a contract whereby the seller transfers or agrees to transfer the property in goods to the buyer for a price.• There may be a contract of sale between one part-owner and another.• Contract is consensual and bilateral• A contract of sale may be absolute or conditional.• Where under a contract of sale the property in the goods is transferred from the seller to the buyer, it‘s a sale, but where the transfer is to take place at a future time or subject to some condition thereafter to be fulfilled, the contract is called an agreement to sell.
  13. 13. CONTRACT OF SALE (Contd) An agreement to sell becomes a sale when the time elapses or the conditions are fulfilled subject to which the property in the goods is to be transferred Money Consideration Default and damage cases
  14. 14. Formalities of ContractContract of sale made A contract of sale is made by an offer to buy or sell goods for a price and the acceptance of such offer. It may provide for the immediate delivery of the goods or immediate payment of the price or both, or for the delivery or payment by installments, or that the delivery or payment or both shall be postponed. Subject to the provisions of any law for the time being in force, a contract of sale may be made in writing or by word of mouth, or partly in writing and partly by word of mouth or may be implied from the conduct of the parties.
  15. 15. Subject-matter of ContractExisting or future goods:• The goods which form the subject of a contract of sale may be either existing goods, owned or possessed by the seller, or future goods.• There may be a contract for the sale of goods the acquisition of which by the seller depends upon a contingency which may or may not happen.• Where by a contract of sale the seller purports to effect a present sale of future goods, the contract operates as an agreement to sell the goods.
  16. 16. Goods perishing before making of contract: Where there is a contract-for the sale of specific goods, it‘s void if the goods without the knowledge of the seller have perished or become so damaged as no longer to answer to their description in the contract, at the time when the contract was madeGoods perishing before sale but after agreement to sell: Where there is an agreement to sell specific goods, and subsequently the goods without any fault on the part of the seller or buyer perish or become so damaged as no longer to answer to their description in the agreement before the risk passes to the buyer, the agreement is thereby avoided.
  17. 17. The PriceAscertainment of price:• The price in a contract of sale may be fixed by the contract or may be left to be fixed in manner thereby agreed or may be determined by the course of dealing between the parties.• Where the price is not determined in accordance with the foregoing provisions, the buyer shall pay the seller a reasonable price.• What is a reason-able price is a question of fact dependent on the circumstances of each particular case
  18. 18. Relevant Case Ganganagar Sugar Mills Ltd. Vs. Rameshwar Das Tara Chand AIR 1992 Raj 14  Sugar in specific quantity and of the given lot and in deliverable state was knocked down to a bidder at an auction. It was deemed property passed at the very moment.  Subsequent imposition of price control did not make the contract unlawful and hence bid price was recoverable.
  19. 19. Agreement to sell at valuation:• Where there is an agreement to sell goods on the terms that the price is to be fixed by the valuation of a third party and such third party cannot or does not make such valuation, the agreement is thereby avoided, Provided that, if the goods or any part thereof have been delivered to, and appropriated by, the buyer, he shall pay a reasonable price therefore• Where such third party is prevented from making the valuation by the fault of the seller or buyer, the party not in fault may maintain a suit for damages against the party in fault.
  20. 20. CONDITIONS AND WARRANTIES
  21. 21. CONDITIONS A condition is a basic and important part of the contract. If one party breaches a condition then the other party may  End the contract  Refuse to perform their part of the contract  Continue with the contract but then sue for damages
  22. 22. WARRANTIES On the other hand, a warranty is not vital to the contract. If one party breaches a warranty then the other party can only continue with the contract and then sue for damages
  23. 23. IMPLIED UNDERTAKING RIGHT TO TITLE(section 14) Seller has the right to sell. The buyer shall have and enjoy quiet possession of the goods. Goods shall be free from any charge or encumbrance in favour of any third party not declared or known to the buyer before or at the time when the contract is made.
  24. 24. Relevant CaseUnited India Insurance vs. Kanchan Bai. AIR 1981 MP 225 A truck involved in an accident was sold to another party, while not fulfilling the requirements of the Motor Vehicle Act, relating to delivery and payment of full consideration. The owner was held responsible for the accident and its consequences.
  25. 25. Sale by description• Impose obligation on seller and manufacturer where sale made in course of business.• Where the purchaser has not seen the good and relies on the description alone, the buyer must get what has been described.• Provided that, in the case of a contract for the sale of a specified article under its patent or other trade name, there is no implied condition as to its fitness for any particular purpose
  26. 26. Description with examination• Where goods are bought by description from a seller who deals in goods of that description (whether he is the manufacturer or producer or not), there is an implied condition that the goods shall be of merchantable quality, Provided that, if the buyer has examined the goods, there shall be no implied condition as regards defects which such examination ought to have revealed.
  27. 27. Implied conditions Section 16 Implied conditions as to fitness for purpose – goods must be reasonably fit for the purpose for which they were bought Implied conditions as to merchantable quality – goods are capable of function they are made to perform or function reasonably expected by buyer
  28. 28. SALE BY SAMPLEIn the case of a contract for sale by sample there is an implied condition— • (a) that the bulk shall correspond with the sample in quality ; • (b) that the buyer shall have a reasonable opportunity of comparing the bulk with the sample; • (c) that the goods shall be free from any defect, rendering them unmerchantable, which would not be apparent on reasonable examination of the sample.
  29. 29. Remedies for breach of contract ofsale For unpaid seller  has not received full payment  has rights against goods, but differ depending on whether goods have already passed to buyer  has rights against buyer where buyer refuses or neglects to accept delivery
  30. 30. Remedies for breach of contract ofsale For buyer  purchaser of goods from seller  has rights against seller where seller has not delivered goods or goods have defect  claim damages  specific performance  buyer may rescind from contract
  31. 31. Buyer beware CAVEAT EMPTOR- a buyer buys at his own risk. Now we have consumer protection act (1986)
  32. 32. EFFECTS OF CONTRACT
  33. 33. Transfer of Property between Buyerand Seller1. Goods must be ascertained- No property in the goods is transferred to the buyer until they are ascertained.2. Property passes when intended to pass  For the purpose of ascertaining intention, terms of contract, conduct of parties & circumstances of case to be considered.  Sections 20 to 24 to be considered to ascertain intention of parties.
  34. 34. Relevant Case• Abdul Aziz vs. Jogendra Krishna Roy,(1917) ILR 44 Cal 98  The sale had taken place, but still the goods were not passed as the custom of the trade was that the goods should be selected, tested and weighed by the buyer.  Even if the sale is unconditional, the court can rule not in favour of the seller.
  35. 35. 3.Specific goods in a deliverable state  In such a case, property passes to the buyer when contract is made, irrespective of the time of payment of price or delivery of goods.4.Specific goods to be put in deliverable state  When seller is bound to do something, property passes only when such thing is done and buyer takes notice thereof.
  36. 36. 5.Sale of unascertained goods & appropriation  Where there is sale of unascertained goods and goods of that description are unconditionally appropriated to the contract, the property thereupon passes to the buyer.  Where seller transfers the goods to bailee or carrier for transmission to buyer, he is deemed to have unconditionally appropriated the goods to the contract.
  37. 37. 6.Goods sent on approval or ―on sale or return‖In such cases, property passes to the buyer –  When he signifies approval or acceptance to the seller;  When he does not signify acceptance, but retains the goods without giving notice of rejection,
  38. 38. Risk prima facie passes withproperty When property in the goods is transferred to the buyer, the goods are at the buyer‘s risk whether delivery has been made or not.  Provided that, where delivery has been delayed through the fault of either buyer or seller, the goods are at the risk of the party in fault.
  39. 39. Relevant CaseDigambar Pershad Kirti Prasad vs. State of UP,(1996) All LJ 158 Auction of a forest knocked down to highest bidder, approved by conservator of forests. Purchaser commenced felling and collecting at a central point for transport. The forest was destroyed by fire. Purchaser liable to pay full bid money and not merely the price of forest harvested. The contract was unconditional, the goods were specific and in deliverable state. The property passed as the contract was made.
  40. 40. Transfer of title1.Sale by person not the owner In case a person, who is not the owner of the goods, sells them thereof without the authority or the consent of the seller, the buyer acquires no better title than what the seller had. Exception: where a mercantile agent is, with the consent of the owner, in possession of the goods, any sale made by him, shall be valid, provided that the buyer has acted in good faith and was not aware, at the time of purchase that seller has no authority to sell.
  41. 41. Relevant CaseState of M.P vs. G.L Patel & Co. AIR 1997 MP 74  Auction of forest produce to be sanctioned for final approval by Conservator of Forests.  Acceptance of the bid by Divisional Forest officer had no binding efficacy, sale incomplete, so was cancelled by the state govt.
  42. 42. 2.Sale by one of joint owners If one of several joint owners of goods has sole possession of them by permission of the co-owners, the property transfers to the buyer who buys the goods from such joint owner, provided he bought the goods in good faith and had not noticed at the time of purchase that the seller has no authority to sell.
  43. 43. 3.Sale by person in possession of goods under voidable contract When the seller has obtained possession under a contract voidable under section 19 or 19A,but the contract has not been rescinded at the time of contract, the buyer acquires a good title to the goods, provided he acted in good faith.4. Seller or buyer in possession after sale • If a person, having sold goods, continue to be in possession of such goods, and sells them to some other person, in that case the subsequent buyer acquires a good title to such goods, provided he acted in good faith and without notice of the previous sale.
  44. 44. • Also where a person, having bought or agreed to buy goods, obtains possession of the goods or documents of title, and subsequently sells them to some other person, who receives them in good faith and without notice of any lien or other right of the original seller, shall have effect as if such lien or right did not exist.
  45. 45. Performance of the contract
  46. 46. Seller and Buyer Duty of seller to deliver the goods Duty of buyer to accept and pay for them
  47. 47. Delivery Payment and delivery are concurrent conditions  Seller willing to give possession of the goods to the buyer in exchange for the price  Buyer shall be willing to pay the price in exchange for possession of the goods.  doing anything which the parties agree shall be treated as delivery  putting the goods in the possession of the buyer or of any person authorized to hold them on his behalf
  48. 48. Effects of Part Delivery A delivery of part of goods, in progress of the delivery of the whole, has the same effect, for the purpose of passing the property in such goods, as a delivery of the whole; but a delivery of part of the goods, with an intention of severing it from the whole, does not operate as a delivery of the remainder.
  49. 49. Buyer to apply for delivery Apart from any express contract, the seller of goods is not bound to deliver them until the buyer applies for delivery.
  50. 50. Rules as to delivery(1)Question depending in each case on the contract, express or implied, between the parties. Apart from any such contract, goods sold are to be delivered at the place at which they are at the time of the sale, and goods agreed to be sold are to be delivered at the place at which they are at the time of the agreement to sell, or, if not then in existence, at the place at which they are manufactured or produced.
  51. 51. (2) Where under the contract of sale the seller is bound to send the goods to the buyer, but no time for sending them is fixed, the seller is bound to send them within a reasonable time.(3) Where the goods at the time of sale are in the possession of a third person, there is no delivery by seller to buyer unless and until such third person acknowledges to the buyer that he holds the goods on his behalf:
  52. 52. Rules as to Delivery Contd…(4) Demand or tender of delivery may be treated as ineffectual unless made at a reasonable hour. What is a reasonable hour is a question of fact.(5) Unless otherwise agreed, the expenses of and incidental to putting the goods into a deliverable state shall be borne by the seller.
  53. 53. Delivery of wrong quantity Short Delivery - Where the seller delivers to the buyer a lesser quantity of goods, the buyer may reject them, but if the buyer accepts the goods so delivered he shall pay for them at the contract rate. Excess Delivery - Where the seller delivers to the buyer a greater quantity of goods, the buyer may accept the goods included in the contract and reject the rest, or he may reject the whole. If the buyer accepts the whole of the goods so delivered, he shall pay for them at the contract rate.
  54. 54.  Delivery of Mixed Goods - Where the seller delivers to the buyer the goods he contracted to sell mixed with goods of a different description not included in the contract, the buyer may accept the goods which are in accordance with the contract and reject the rest, or may reject the whole. The provisions of this section are subject to any usage of trade, special agreement or course of dealing between the parties.
  55. 55. Delivery to carrier Where, in pursuance of a contract of sale the seller is authorized or required to send the goods to the buyer, delivery of the goods to a carrier, whether named by the buyer or not, for the purpose of transmission to the buyer, or delivery of the goods to a wharfinger for safe custody, is prima facie deemed to be a delivery of the goods to the buyer. Unless otherwise authorized by the buyer, the seller shall make such contract with the carrier on behalf of the buyer as may be reasonable having regard to the nature of the goods. If the seller omits so to do, and the goods are lost or damaged in course of transit, the buyer may decline to treat the delivery to the carrier as a delivery to himself.
  56. 56.  Unless otherwise agreed, where goods are sent by the seller to the buyer by a route involving sea transit, in circumstances in which it is usual to insure, the seller shall give such notice to the buyer as may enable him to insure them during their sea transit, and if the seller fails so to do, the goods shall be deemed to be at his risk during such sea transit.
  57. 57. Buyer‘s Right Mayank Rai Roll No. 381
  58. 58. Buyers right of examining the goods Where goods are delivered to the buyer which he has not previously examined, he is not deemed to have accepted them unless and until he has had a reasonable opportunity of examining them for the purpose of ascertain-ing whether they are in conformity with the contract. Unless otherwise agreed, when the seller tenders delivery of goods to the buyer, he is bound, on request, to afford the buyer a reasonable opportunity of examining the goods for the purpose of ascertaining whether they are in conformity with the contract.
  59. 59. Acceptance The buyer is deemed to have accepted the goods when he intimates to the seller that he has accepted them, or when the goods have been delivered to him and he does any act in relation to them which is inconsistent with the ownership of the seller, or when, after the lapse of a reasonable time, he retains the goods without intimating to the seller that he has rejected them.
  60. 60. Rejection of GoodsBuyer not bound to return rejected goods Unless otherwise agreed, where goods are delivered to the buyer and he refuses to accept them, having the right so to do, he is not bound to return them to the seller, but it is sufficient if he intimates to the seller that he refuses to accept them.Liability of buyer for neglecting or refusing delivery of goods When the seller is ready and willing to deliver the goods and requests the buyer to take delivery, and the buyer does not within a reasonable time after such request take delivery of the goods, he is liable to the seller for any loss occasioned by his neglect or refusal to take delivery, and also for a reasonable charge for the care and custody of the goods
  61. 61. Relevant Case National Small Industries Corporation Limited vs. Ramchandra Raghunath Joshi, (1995) ALHC 400(Bom): (1994)4 Bom LR 598 The buyer refused to take delivery of goods. Seller resold the goods. The difference between the contract price and resale price was allowed by way of damages. The buyer‘s neglect does not entitle the seller to put an end to the contract.
  62. 62. Rights of the Unpaid Seller Mohit Jain Roll No. 326
  63. 63. RIGHTS OF THE UNPAID SELLER AGAINST THE GOODSDEFINITION: UNPAID SELLERa) when the whole of the price has not been paid or tenderedb) when a bill of exchange or other negotiable instrument has been received as conditional payment, and the condition on which it was received has not been fulfilled by reason of the dishonour of the instrument or otherwise
  64. 64. SELLERThe term "seller" includes any person who is inthe position of a seller, as, for instance, an agentof the seller to whom the bill of lading has beenendorsed, or a consignor or agent who hashimself paid, or is directly responsible for, theprice.
  65. 65. Unpaid sellers rights a lien on the goods for the price while he is in possession of them in case of the insolvency of the buyer a right of stopping the goods in transit after he has parted with the possession of them a right of re-sale as limited by this Act
  66. 66. Unpaid sellers lien Sellers lien. Part delivery. Termination of lien. Stoppage in transit• Right of stoppage in transit.• Duration of transit.• How stoppage in transit is effected.
  67. 67. Transfer by buyer and seller Effect of sub-sale or pledge by buyer Sale not generally rescinded by lien or stoppage in transit.
  68. 68. SUITS FOR BREACH OF THE CONTRACT Mandeep Singh Grover Roll No. 317
  69. 69. Suits for Breach of the Contract Seller‘s Remedies Against Buyer  Suit for Price  Damages for non-acceptance Buyer‘s Remedies Against Seller  Damages for non-delivery  Specific Performance  Remedy for Breach of Warranty  Repudiation of contract before due date  Interest by way of damages and special damages
  70. 70. Suit for price• Where under a contract of sale the property in the goods has passed to the buyer and the buyer wrongfully neglects or refuses to pay for the goods according to the terms of the contract, the seller may sue him for the price of the goods.• Where under a contract of sale the price is payable on a day certain irrespective of delivery and the buyer wrongfully neglects or refuses to pay such price, the seller may sue him for the price although the property in the goods has not passed and the goods have not been appropriated to the contract.• Price in Foreign Currency• Case : Khusalbhai Vs Mohmad Hussain
  71. 71. Damages for non-acceptance Where the buyer wrongfully neglects or refuses to accept and pay for the goods, the seller may sue the buyer for damages for non-acceptance. Damages Assessed acc. to Sections 73 & 74 of contract act Duty of Mitigation : Losses to be calculated on the day of the breach Case: Jamal V Moola Dawood Sons Co.
  72. 72. Damages for non-delivery Where the seller wrongfully neglects or refuses to deliver the goods to the buyer, the buyer may sue the seller for damages for non-delivery. Duty of Mitigation: Losses to be calculated on the day of the breach Case: Patrick Vs. Russo British Grain Export Co.
  73. 73. Specific performance• Subject to the provisions of Chapter II of the Specific Relief Act, 1877 (1 of 1877), in any suit for breach of contract to deliver specific or ascertained goods, the Court may, if it thinks fit, on the application of the plaintiff, by its decree direct that the contract shall be performed specifically, without giving the defendant the option of retaining the goods on payment of damages.• The decree may be unconditional, or upon such terms and conditions as to damages, payment of the price or otherwise, as the Court may deem just, and the application of the plaintiff may be made at any time before the decree.
  74. 74. Remedy for breach of warranty• Where there is a breach of warranty by the seller, or where the buyer elects or is compelled to treat any breach of a condition on the part of the seller as a breach of warranty, the buyer is not by reason only of such breach of warranty entitled to reject the goods; but he may—(a) set up against the seller the breach of warranty in diminution or extinction of the price; or(b) sue the seller for damages for breach of warrantyThe fact that a buyer has set up a breach of warranty in diminution or extinction of the price does not prevent him from suing for the same breach of warranty if he has suffered further damage.Case: Mason Vs. Burningham
  75. 75. Repudiation of contract before duedate Where either party to a contract of sale repudiates the contract before the date of delivery, the other may either treat the contract as subsisting and wait till the date of delivery, or he may treat the contract as rescinded and sue for damages for the breach. Damages to be assessed on the day stipulated for delivery Case: Hochester V. De La Tour
  76. 76. Interest by way of damages andspecial damages Nothing in this act shall affect the right of the seller or the buyer to recover interest or special damages may be recoverable, or to recover the money paid where the consideration for the payment of it has failed In the absence of a contract to the contrary, court may award interest at such rate it thinks fit on the amount of the price.
  77. 77. Special Damages & Miscellaneous Saurabh Natu Roll No. 343
  78. 78. Interest by way of damages and special damages• Nothing in this Act shall affect the right of the seller or the buyer to recover interest or special damages in any case where by law interest or special damages may be recoverable, or to recover the money paid where the consideration for the payment of it has failed.• In the absence of a contract to the contrary, the Court may award interest at such rate as it thinks fit on the amount of the price—(a) to the seller in a suit by him for the amount of the price—from the date of the tender of the goods or from the date on which the price was payable;(a) to the buyer in a suit by him for the refund of the price in a case of a breach of the contract on the part of the seller—from the date on which the payment was made
  79. 79. Miscellaneous Exclusion of Implied Terms and Conditions  By Express Contract  Course of Dealing  Trade Usage Reasonable Time
  80. 80. Miscellaneous Auction Sale  Right to Impose Conditions  Formation of Ring or Knock Out  Bidder‘s right to withdraw bid  Auctioneer‘s right not to accept any bid  Acceptance by Proper Authority Incidence of Taxation Repeal and Savings
  81. 81. Thank you
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