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Introduction to solutions (chapter 5)
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Introduction to solutions (chapter 5)

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  • 1. Introduction to Solutions (Chapter 5)
    7 SCIENCE
  • 2. How do solutions relate to matter?
    Atoms make up all matter on earth; therefore solutions are made from atoms
    When atoms combine they are called chemical compounds
    Ex: What atoms make up the chemical compound water?
    These chemical compounds cannot be separated by physical processes like squeezing, filtering etc
    If a substance can be broken down by physical processes it is called a mixture
  • 3. Mixtures
    A mixture is a combination of substances that can be separated by physical means
    Ex: boiling saltwater to separate the salt from the water
    Two types of mixtures:
    Heterogeneous
    Homogeneous
  • 4. Heterogeneous Mixtures
    Hetero = different
    The substances in a heterogeneous mixture are not mixed evenly, so different parts have different compositions
    Different parts of the mixture are easy to see
    Ex: watermelon and seeds
    Ex: oil in water
  • 5. Homogeneous Mixtures
    Homo = same
    Made up of 2 or more substances and one appears to ‘disappear’ into the other
    Not easy to see the different parts
    Ex: Saltwater – you cannot see the salt as different than the water
    Ex: Nestea powder into water cannot see the powder is different
    Also called a solution
  • 6. Solutions
    When you mix 2 or more substances together, the substance that seems to disappear (dissolves), is called the solute
    The substance that dissolves the solute is called the solvent
    Ex: Sugar and coffee
    Which is the solute? Solvent?
  • 7. Mixtures activity
    Instructions:You will travel to each mixture station and be responsible for creating a mixture with your group, record observations and answer questions individually
    1) Read and follow the instructions from Ms.Young and create a hypothesis for each substance.
    2) Test your hypothesis by creating a mixture at each station with 100mL of water and half a teaspoon of each substance.
    3) Stir until there is no change in the mixture.
    4) Record observations for each substance.
    5) Please answer the following questions on the back of your observation paper:
    Which substances dissolved into the water when you stirred?
    For the substance(s) that dissolved, how do you know that it is still there? How could you figure this out?
    Do you think the ability of water to dissolve many substances is useful in our lives? Explain why/why not.