Behavior of liquids and gases buoyancy

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Behavior of liquids and gases buoyancy

  1. 1. Behavior of Liquids and Gases: Archimedes’ principle<br />7SCIENCE Wed. April 13<br />
  2. 2. Review: What are some factors that affect the behavior of liquids and gases?<br />Diffusion- mixing of particles <br />Pressure - Pascal’s principle<br />When pressure is applied to a point in a liquid or gas the pressure will travel unchanged through the liquid or gas<br />
  3. 3. Density and Archimedes’ principle<br />Every substance (solid, liquid or gas) has a density<br />Density refers to if particles in a substance are closely packed together<br /> Density (g/mL)= mass (g)<br /> volume (mL)<br />Higher density = particles are packed more closely Lower density = particles are further apart<br />
  4. 4. Density and Archimedes’ principle<br />Why do some objects float and others sink?<br />If an object has a density lower than that of the surrounding liquid or gas, it will float<br />OPPOSITE: If an object has a density higher than that of the liquid or gas, it will sink<br />
  5. 5. Buoyancy and Archimedes’ principle<br />The idea of buoyancy is that objects tend to float or sink in a liquid<br />Buoyancy is a decrease in weight caused by an upward force in a liquid or gas<br />- Objects have a specific buoyancy<br />Ex: floating in a swimming pool or lake <br />Archimedes’ principle states:<br />An object will sink until the volume of liquid displaced equals the weight of the object (then it will float)<br />
  6. 6. Application of Archimedes’ principle<br />“Plimsoll line”<br /><ul><li>Line painted on the side of a ship or boat
  7. 7. If the boat is sitting low and the line is under the water, the ship is overloaded (too heavy)</li>

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