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Science is a moving target
 

Science is a moving target

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This presentation will be structured around the research cycle, beginning with experimental hypothesis, moving to data collection, analysis/writing, publication and finishing with scientific ...

This presentation will be structured around the research cycle, beginning with experimental hypothesis, moving to data collection, analysis/writing, publication and finishing with scientific networking and collaboration. As we walk through the cycle, we will introduce and discuss many of the concepts that shape modern research. From big data, small data, curation and ontologies to open laboratory notebooks and team science initiatives, participants will come away with a working knowledge of the key issues surrounding eScience.

Jackie Wirz, PhD, Biomedical Research Specialist & Assistant Professor, Oregon Health & Science University
Amanda Whitmire, PhD, Data Management Specialist & Assistant Professor, Oregon State University

Please note: We used non-standard fonts and several large image files: the result is that this presentation does not look great in Slideshare. If you would like high quality slides, please let us know! Also, the notes are minimal: Jackie will go back and annotate her slides in the future.

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  • AW – We are two Ph.D. trained scientists-turned-librarians who are here to share insight on the research process.As we talk with you today, think about how your skills and interests may overlap with that of non-library researchers, and how you are probably in a great position to provide research support without a huge amount of “up-skilling,” training, or professional development. Purpose of the talk: getting librarians and researchers on the same page. Common skill sets and interests. Image modified from Roche.com
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  • AW - One nugget that we want to impress upon you, and maybe it’s something that you already know or suspect, is that the ideal “research cycle” does NOT match with reality. It’s useful as a framework, but doesn’t convey the reality of science and research as it really happens at universities. In reality, we are doing all of these things all the time… just like in the library.
  • AW – So, here we go. Let’s talk research!
  • AW – the conceptual version of the research cycle, nice and tidy.
  • AW – a common view of how time is more likely spent during the research cycle: mostly thinking, doing research, and getting famous.
  • AW –In fact, professors leading research groups spend an inordinate amount of time trying to keep themselves and their lab employed. Consider this: in 2012, the funding rate at NSF was about 25% (+/- 10%), or about a 1 in 4 chance of your proposal being funded. Many PIs are only supported by their institution for 4 – 6 months. A 9 month position is generous. A 12 month position is almost unheard of. It’s an unwritten rule that PI’s can’t fund themselves any more than 1-2 months on one project. So, if you have to fund yourself for 6 months, you need at least, at LEAST 3 projects funded on a regular basis. At a 25% funding rate, your writing 12 proposals a year, or about one per month. Maintaining funding support is a constant effort for investigators.
  • AW – The reality of life in academia is that you are constantly working in funding. Because you have to have so many projects going to fund yourself, you are also constantly involved in research for one project or another, with bursts of compiling and sharing that usually occur around conference or agency report due dates.
  • AW – perception: science is cutting edge and sexy.Tony Stark Image from http://hellotailor.blogspot.com/2012/05/costumes-and-characters-of-avengers_10.htmlBruce Banner Image from http://comicsbeat.com/everything-you-ever-wanted-to-know-about-the-avengers-movie/
  • AW – reality: it’s a lot of talking shop around the lunch or dinner table, with creativity and inspiration drawn from imbibing alcohol.Avengers eating Shawarma Image from http://imgur.com/bLBBu
  • This is a little bit of a tangent, but as scientists, this is something that Jackie and I have strong feelings about and feel uniquely qualified to discuss. Has anyone here aver been confused by the use of the words eScience or eResearch? Like, what is the difference between the two? Yes. We were too. So, let’s get it cleared up.
  • Basically, it’s data so big that it has to be processed on gridded machines. It’s not a scientific discipline; it’s a methodology. Are academic libraries involved in eScience? Maybe a little bit. True eScience is a very small chunk of a much larger research portfolio at universities.ARL definition of eScience: “E-science is defined broadly to include all of the natural and physical sciences, related applied and technological disciplines, as well as biomedicine and social sciences sharing research approaches with the natural sciences.” Why is it important to understand this? Because you have to be able to communicate clearly with scientists and researchers. Unless they are doing BIG stuff, it’s not eScience and they won’t know WTF you’re talking about. https://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Photo/Public/2005/0511013/0511013_02/0511013_02-A4-at-144-dpi.jpg
  • From ESI: “E-Research projects often make use of grid computing or other advanced technologies, and are usually data intensive, but the concept also includes research performed digitally at any scale.”Basically refers to all of modern research, regardless of discipline. A definition so vague that it’s useless at least, and confusing at worst. “eResearch” is a distraction from the important question: how can libraries better integrate with, and better support [scientific] research? What should you be saying? DATA-DRIVEN or DATA-INTENSIVE work really well.
  • AW - Spend a minute talking about data & metadata – they are DIVERSE.
  • AW – Perhaps it’s not surprise that data and metadata are as diverse as the researchers creating them. Even a single dataset can be viewed or used differently by different scientists. http://rachaelherbert.blogspot.com/2010/07/you-say-tomatoe.html
  • AW – data are diverse – no surprise. You don’t have to be familiar with every aspect of the data to help researchers improve their data and information management, tohelp them publish or cite data, to help them find a repository with data that they could use. Don’t be intimidated by data – dive in!
  • AW- Metadata, holy smokes! Metadata is just as crazy as data.Librarians have many types of metadata, which can be as confusing to scientists as data can be to librarians. There is actually a tremendous amount of overlap between the two, but the lack of common understanding is what we believe to be one of the major disconnects between libraries and researchers. At OSU, we have a whole librarian just for this. Pretty awesome.
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  • JWImage from the Society for Neuroscience
  • JWImage from mindfirst.com
  • JWImage from Flikr Creative Commons
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  • JWwww.motivationals.org
  • JWCTSAconnect VIVOhttp://www.cs.vu.nl/~frankh/clouds/Facebook-Network-Feb-2011-zoom.jpg
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  • JWImage modified from http://putdowntheurinalcake.com
  • JWImage from http://www.agilepmsolutions.net/grant-writing-solutions
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  • JWData collected from the eagle-i Network
  • JWImage modified from http://putdowntheurinalcake.com
  • AW – what is the role of libraries in supporting data management? First, librarians have to familiarize themselves with data and research process (which motivates this talk). Many institutions/data librarians have conducted interviews with faculty, and not surprisingly, they discovered a huge diversity of data, as large a diversity of needs, and almost universal inadequacy in researcher data management practices. Role of library: web content, workshops, consultations, formal education (grad level), and maybe, curation of data. Which leads to next slide…
  • AW -"Open-source Project for a Network Data Access Protocol”is a data transport architecture and protocol.Shared: maybe on a web site. Someone might find it.Discoverable: People/Google WILL find it.OPeNDAP: they can find it, and extract only what they want/need.MODIS – orbits the Earth and collects a global snapshot every 1-2 days. Data products are available at multiple stages of processing, from radiances to derived products, at 2 grid scales (4 km and 9 km), and binned time composites ranging from daily, 3 days, 8 days, to monthly, seasonal, annual. Talk about data management! And yet, you can go to NASA’s ocean color page, search for a lat/lon range, a time range, and which products you are interested in, and download only those data. How? OPeNDAP. There is your model for data curation in an eScience age. So, if you’re thinking about a data repository, think about how you can make it work as flexibly and efficiently as possible.
  • AW – one of the biggest challenges that researchers face is organizing their data and tracking changes through processing steps. Solutions are as variable as the researchers themselves.
  • AW – naming conventions go a long way toward organizing data and making it easy to find. Librarians are well-versed in the organization or information, e.g. cataloging. Apply that experience to data organization – no problemo! Think Dewey Decimal Classification or Library of Congress Classification.Hat tip to BrianWestra for this exampleImage from Jorge Cham, www.phdcomics.com
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  • JWImage from circos.ca
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  • JWModified from the most excellent xkcd.com
  • JWImage from Johan Bollen et. Al. Clickstream Data Yields High-Resolution Maps of Science, PLoS One 2009http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0004803
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  • AW – So, let’s review.
  • AWImage modified from the most excellent xkcd.com
  • AW – All librarians can be more integrated than we realize, and many of our skills directly translate. Think about the things we’ve talked about today - metadata, locating or depositing data in databases, dissemination of research results, instruction, creating web resources, visualization, impact metrics, ontologies, and others. So, use an awareness of the realities of the research cycle to find ways to GET OUT THERE!
  • AW – find opportunities! They are out there!
  • Pretty Pictures
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Science is a moving target Science is a moving target Presentation Transcript

  • SCIENCE IS A MOVIN eScience, Team Science the Data Deluge and More
  • Hello there!
  • 1 | Research 101 2 | The Cycle 3 | +Library
  • Jackie…
  • Amanda…
  • Research Rocks
  • 1 | Research 101
  • The Research Cycle
  • The Research Cycle
  • The Research Cycle 1. Brilliant Idea! 2. Build Idea 3. Fund Idea 4. Research 5. Compile 6. Share & Store 7. Fame, Fortune
  • The Research Cycle: What people think 1. Brilliant Idea! 2. Build Idea 3. Fund Idea 4. Research 5. Compile 6. Share & Store 7. Fame, Fortune (cure cancer)
  • The Research Cycle: What Really Happens 1. Brilliant Idea! 2. Build Idea 3. Fund Id 4. Research 5. Compile 6. Share & Store 7. Fame, Fortune
  • The Research Cycle: What Really Happens 1. Idea! 2. Build Idea 3.FUND IDEA4.Research 5. Compile 6. Share & Stor 1. Idea #2 2. Try #2 0. Failure!! 1. Idea #896 0. Try Beer 2. Build #896
  • The Research Cycle: What People Think
  • The Research Cycle: What Really Happens
  • escience + eresearch = ewhat?
  • escience: What Is it?
  • eresearch: What Is it?
  • you say tomato…
  • tomaytoe tomahto Solanum lycopersicum PANTONE 1795 C tdTomato 554ex 581em $64
  • Data comes in many flavors
  • MetaData comes in many flavors
  • 2 | The Cycle
  • The Research Cycle 1. Brilliant Idea! 2. Build Idea 3. Fund Idea 4. Research 5. Compile 6. Share & Store 7. Fame, Fortune
  • Where do good ideas come from?
  • Hypothesis |incremental |data
  • Literature
  • conferences
  • Thinking (really hard)
  • Group Drinking Thinking
  • The Research Cycle 1. Brilliant Idea! 2. Build Idea 3. Fund Idea 4. Research 5. Compile 6. Share & Store 7. Fame, Fortune
  • Existing data | literature | Databases
  • Existing data | literature | Databases
  • Colleagues  Team Science
  • OHSU Schools Resources Shared Research Resources Research Centers Advanced Imaging Research Center Casey Eye Institute Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction Center for Ethics in Health Care Center for Evidence-Based Policy Center for Policy & Research in Emergency Medicine Center for Research on Occupational Environmental Toxicology Child Development and Rehabilitation Center Dotter Interventional Institute Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center Heart Research Center Jungers Center for Neurosciences Research Knight Cancer Institute Layton Aging and Alzheimer's Disease Center Methamphetamine Abuse Research Center OHSU Epilepsy Center One Sky Center Oregon Brain Institute Oregon Center for Aging and Technology Oregon Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine in Neurological Disorders Oregon Clinical and Translational Research Institute Oregon Evidence Based Practice Institute Oregon Health Policy Institute Oregon Hearing Research Center Oregon National Primate Research Center Oregon Stem Cell Center Oregon Stroke Center Parkinson Center of Oregon Portland Alcohol Research Center Research Center for Gender-Based Medicine Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute Vollum Institute Advanced Computing Advanced Light Microscopy Affymetrix Microarray Illumina Microarray Bioanalytical/Pharmacokinetics Biostatistics DNA Services Electronics and Instrumentation Design Flow Cytometry Histopathology Proteomics Transgenic Mouse Models School of Medicine Behavioral Neuroscience Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Cell and Developmental Biology Molecular and Medical Genetics Molecular Microbiology and Immunology Physiology and Pharmacology Science and Engineering Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine Dermatology Diagnostic Radiology Emergency Medicine Family Medicine Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology Medicine Neurological Surgery Neurology Obstetrics & Gynecology Ophthalmology Orthopaedics & Rehabilitation Otolaryngology & Head & Neck Surgery Pathology Pediatrics Psychiatry Public Health & Preventive Medicine Radiation Medicine Surgery Research Pharmacy Departmental Cores Other Resources Clinical Science Dental Clinical Research Center School of Dentistry Hartford Center for Geriatric Nursing Excellence School of Nursing Basic Science School of Pharmacy Cores OHSU Library Science Education and Outreach Center for Diversity and Multicultural Affairs Medical Photography Educational Communications
  • OHSU Schools Resources Shared Research Resources Research Centers Advanced Imaging Research Center Casey Eye Institute Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction Center for Ethics in Health Care Center for Evidence-Based Policy Center for Policy & Research in Emergency Medicine Center for Research on Occupational Environmental Toxicology Child Development and Rehabilitation Center Dotter Interventional Institute Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center Heart Research Center Jungers Center for Neurosciences Research Knight Cancer Institute Layton Aging and Alzheimer's Disease Center Methamphetamine Abuse Research Center OHSU Epilepsy Center One Sky Center Oregon Brain Institute Oregon Center for Aging and Technology Oregon Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine in Neurological Disorders Oregon Clinical and Translational Research Institute Oregon Evidence Based Practice Institute Oregon Health Policy Institute Oregon Hearing Research Center Oregon National Primate Research Center Oregon Stem Cell Center Oregon Stroke Center Parkinson Center of Oregon Portland Alcohol Research Center Research Center for Gender-Based Medicine Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute Vollum Institute Advanced Computing Advanced Light Microscopy Affymetrix Microarray Illumina Microarray Bioanalytical/Pharmacokinetics Biostatistics DNA Services Electronics and Instrumentation Design Flow Cytometry Histopathology Proteomics Transgenic Mouse Models School of Medicine Behavioral Neuroscience Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Cell and Developmental Biology Molecular and Medical Genetics Molecular Microbiology and Immunology Physiology and Pharmacology Science and Engineering Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine Dermatology Diagnostic Radiology Emergency Medicine Family Medicine Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology Medicine Neurological Surgery Neurology Obstetrics & Gynecology Ophthalmology Orthopaedics & Rehabilitation Otolaryngology & Head & Neck Surgery Pathology Pediatrics Psychiatry Public Health & Preventive Medicine Radiation Medicine Surgery Research Pharmacy Departmental Cores Other Resources Clinical Science Dental Clinical Research Center School of Dentistry Hartford Center for Geriatric Nursing Excellence School of Nursing Basic Science School of Pharmacy Cores OHSU Library Science Education and Outreach CeDMA Medical Photography Educational Communications
  • OHSU Schools + Shared Research Resources Research Centers Advanced Imaging Research Center Casey Eye Institute Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction Center for Ethics in Health Care Center for Evidence-Based Policy Center for Policy & Research in Emergency Medicine Center for Research on Occupational Environmental Toxicology Child Development and Rehabilitation Center Dotter Interventional Institute Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center Heart Research Center Jungers Center for Neurosciences Research Knight Cancer Institute Layton Aging and Alzheimer's Disease Center Methamphetamine Abuse Research Center OHSU Epilepsy Center One Sky Center Oregon Brain Institute Oregon Center for Aging and Technology Oregon Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine in Neurological Disorders Oregon Clinical and Translational Research Institute Oregon Evidence Based Practice Institute Oregon Health Policy Institute Oregon Hearing Research Center Oregon National Primate Research Center Oregon Stem Cell Center Oregon Stroke Center Parkinson Center of Oregon Portland Alcohol Research Center Research Center for Gender-Based Medicine Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute Vollum Institute Advanced Computing Advanced Light Microscopy Affymetrix Microarray Illumina Microarray Bioanalytical/Pharmacokinetics Biostatistics DNA Services Electronics and Instrumentation Design Flow Cytometry Histopathology Proteomics Transgenic Mouse Models School of Medicine Behavioral Neuroscience Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Cell and Developmental Biology Molecular and Medical Genetics Molecular Microbiology and Immunology Physiology and Pharmacology Science and Engineering Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine Dermatology Diagnostic Radiology Emergency Medicine Family Medicine Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology Medicine Neurological Surgery Neurology Obstetrics & Gynecology Ophthalmology Orthopaedics & Rehabilitation Otolaryngology & Head & Neck Surgery Pathology Pediatrics Psychiatry Public Health & Preventive Medicine Radiation Medicine Surgery Research Pharmacy Departmental Cores Other Resources Clinical Science Dental Clinical Research Center School of Dentistry Hartford Center for Geriatric Nursing Excellence School of Nursing Basic Science School of Pharmacy Cores OHSU Library Science Education and Outreach CeDMA Medical Photography Educational Communications
  • OHSU Schools + Shared Research Resources Research Centers School of Medicine Other Resources Clinical Science School of Dentistry School of Nursing Basic Science School of Pharmacy Cores OHSU Library
  • Colleagues  Team Science
  • The Research Cycle 1. Brilliant Idea! 2. Build Idea 3. Fund Idea 4. Research 5. Compile 6. Share & Store 7. Fame, Fortune
  • Money, money, money
  • Where Money Trees Grow
  • How We can Help….
  • How We can Help….
  • The Research Cycle 1. Brilliant Idea! 2. Build Idea 3. Fund Idea 4. Research 5. Compile 6. Share & Store 7. Fame, Fortune
  • Lab Notebooks 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 Number of labs with inventory Total number of labs
  • Lab Notebooks: Next Generation
  • Data management 1. Online resourc 2. workshops 3. consultations 4. coursework 5. Collaboration 6. Data curation
  • Shared vs discoverable vs OPeNDAP
  • Data Tracking | version control
  • Naming conventions Project_instrument_location_YYYYMMDDhhm mss_extra.ext Index/grant conditions Leading zero! s/n, variable Retain order
  • The Research Cycle 1. Brilliant Idea! 2. Build Idea 3. Fund Idea 4. Research 5. Compile 6. Share & Store 7. Fame, Fortune
  • Data does not speak for itself…
  • Scientists speak for their data
  • Casual |conference |paper |funding
  • Casual |conference |paper |funding VISUALIZATION
  • Casual |conference |paper |funding Posters / Talks
  • Casual |conference |paper |funding Papers
  • The Research Cycle 1. Brilliant Idea! 2. Build Idea 3. Fund Idea 4. Research 5. Compile 6. Share & Store 7. Fame, Fortune
  • LIBRARY
  • Metrics and altmetrics
  • Torture numbers, and they'll confess to anything. ~Gregg Easterbrook
  • Statistics can be made to prove anything - even the truth. ~Author Unknown
  • Curation & Ontologies
  • The Research Cycle 1. Brilliant Idea! 2. Build Idea 3. Fund Idea 4. Research 5. Compile 6. Share & Store 7. Fame, Fortune
  • Yeah, right.
  • 3 | +Libraries
  • Hello there! how can we best Integrate With the Research Cycle?
  • LIBRARIAN STEROTYPE Don’t think like this…
  • [Jackie][Geeks] [ONTOLOGY] [DATA Curation] [Scholarly Communication] [MLIS] LIBRARIAN STEROTYPE We Already Do! [Amanda]
  • Just as writers read to sculpt their skill, visualizers look…Look around you. Jessica Hagy You are looking at opportunity.
  • Thank You
  • Contact us! wirzj@ohsu.edu amanda.whitmire@oregonstate. edu
  • Shameless PlugS! Knowledgeomics: The Art and Science of Scholarship and Research March 15th, 2013 @ OHSU, UW, U Utah
  • questions?
  • SCIENCE IS A MOVIN eScience, Team Science the Data Deluge and More
  • 1 | Research 101 2 | The Cycle 3 | +Library