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Kern project3 Kern project3 Presentation Transcript

  • PROJECT 3: Point of Purchase Display Design AMANDA KERN | 3D GRAPHICS STUDIO: GRDS-730-OL PROFESSOR TRUDY ABADIE | MAY 16, 2010
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS PROJECT OBJECTIVES ...................................................3 RESEARCH.................................................................. 4-9 ROUGH DRAFTS ..................................................... 10-14 DISPLAY MOCKUPS ............................................... 15-18 DISPLAY DESIGN IN PROGRESS ............................ 19-22 BASEBALL CARD DESIGN ............................................20 P.O.P. DISPLAY DIE ........................................................23 FINAL P.O.P. DISPLAY DESIGN ............................... 24-28 FINAL THOUGHTS ........................................................29
  • PROJECT 3 OBJECTIVES Objective Process: Part B: Revised Prototype Design and assemble a display for the package you designed for Project 2. This Based on the feedback received, continue working on your prototype. Document display should be used as either a special-promotion display for your product or any changes, and post them to the discussion board to continue to receive as a permanent display for your product. Determine this prior to designing, as it feedback. Post feedback to at least three other postings. will help you decide on the materials. Process: Part C: Prototype with final materials Process: Part A: Research, Sketches & Mockup Continue working on refining your mockup, and develop a prototype using the 1. Spend some time studying the package design you created for Project 2. final materials. Document this piece, and post it to the discussion board to Think about the possibilities to promote this product in a retail environment. receive more feedback. At this point, you don’t need to have all of the products Decide if you would like to create a permanent store fixture for this display or on it. One or two will do. Post feedback to at least three other postings. if you would like to create a promotional display. 2. Research. Go shopping! Take a trip to local retailers of the type that would Process: Part D: Final Design sell your product. Study the retail space as well as existing P-O-P displays. Submit final mockups and your process book via the Submissions link in the Write a short synopsis of your observations. course menu. Post a PDF of the final design, showing multiple angles, to the 3. Brainstorm ideas for the display. Select the ones with the most potential, discussion board. Post feedback to at least three other postings. and move on to the thumbnail stage of your design. You should have at least 5-10 different concepts. 4. Select the design with the most potential, and build a preliminary mockup. Build the mockup at a 1/4-scale size or smaller. You don’t need to use the actual materials for this mockup. 5. Photo-document this piece. 6. Post a multiple-page PDF, containing your design brief (include ideas for materials), your research synopsis, your sketches, and the mockup. 7. Provide feedback on three other postings. Be very specific. Discuss the concepts as well as the execution, and provide suggestions for materials. AMANDA KERN | PROJECT 3 | 3D GRAPHICS STUDIO: GRDS-730-OL | PROFESSOR TRUDY ABADIE | MAY 16, 2010
  • Point of Purchase Examples Attention grabbing displays I took iPhone photos while I was at target of some of the sporting card section at target. I learned that most of the point of purchase displays seem to be generic in style in that regardless of the type of card series design they all have the same look when it comes to structure. There were a few different types but for the most part looking down it wasn’t the point of purchase that stood out so much as the package design. Most card packaging came in opened boxes. There’s a lot of potential to stand out as an original point of purchase. AMANDA KERN | PROJECT 3 | 3D GRAPHICS STUDIO: GRDS-730-OL | PROFESSOR TRUDY ABADIE | MAY 16, 2010
  • Point of Purchase Examples Attention grabbing displays I visited a local walmart and found this display the most memorable. It contained a variety of snacks like capri sun, chips ahoy cookies and more that were branded to the new Dreamworks kids movie “How to Train a Dragon”. The display was very fitting in the shape of a viking styled dragon boat. The boat served as shelving for the products. The Twilight series also had an impactful display. It was relatively basic but the graphics were instantly recognizable to fans and stood out in the store to grab my attention. It contained books and movies. I found the toy section to be very inspiring and filled with lots of displays that grabbed my attention. The first I found was Strawberry shortcake. The design was relatively basic and served as temporary storage that was connected to the original shelving metal elements to hang some of the toys. AMANDA KERN | PROJECT 3 | 3D GRAPHICS STUDIO: GRDS-730-OL | PROFESSOR TRUDY ABADIE | MAY 16, 2010
  • Point of Purchase Examples Attention grabbing displays Walmart’s toy section had many point of purchase displays that commanded attention and leaded customers to the specific toys. I found the toys to be either popular items or of new upcoming toys. I located littlest pet shop, hot wheels, nerf and a display for the new Iron man 2 display. Though all weren’t identical they did share similarities and offered a variety of options for displaying merchandise. AMANDA KERN | PROJECT 3 | 3D GRAPHICS STUDIO: GRDS-730-OL | PROFESSOR TRUDY ABADIE | MAY 16, 2010
  • Point of Purchase Examples Attention grabbing displays I found smaller point of purchase displays throughout the toy section too. These appeared to be connected to existing store metal hanging/feeding display mechanisms. The graphical elements were designed to be displayed on plastic surface that could be attached to the store display mechanisms. It seems to be an easy, quick, and longer lasting display. Some toys had cardboard point of purchase displays for smaller items to ensure multiple items could be displayed. AMANDA KERN | PROJECT 3 | 3D GRAPHICS STUDIO: GRDS-730-OL | PROFESSOR TRUDY ABADIE | MAY 16, 2010
  • Point of Purchase Examples Attention grabbing displays Taylor swift has a new line of greeting cards out and her display caught my attention. It is merely the existing card display with the color of her display integrated behind the cards and above it is a nifty design to catch our attention. Schick Hydro razors won for having the best technology in their display. As I passed it the video caught my attention. The display held the razors. If it weren’t for the technology I wouldn’t have remembered this one at all for the graphics in the display. I found Zyrtec and Claritin to have large displays. Though the displays are likely temporary they seem to be the type that would be used for quite some time due to the necessity of the products for many people. AMANDA KERN | PROJECT 3 | 3D GRAPHICS STUDIO: GRDS-730-OL | PROFESSOR TRUDY ABADIE | MAY 16, 2010
  • Point of Purchase Examples Attention grabbing displays From a distance the Mach3 razors display wasn’t too eye catching but as I got closer I was able to see the detail put into the packaging that held the razors. The nicorette display had a unique way to hold the product. It seemed very easy to set up and for the customers to remove the product from. The Ironman 2 AC DC display caught my attention with the bold colors and large set up. It’s clearly another temporary display that will likely be removed once the newness of the movie wears off. AMANDA KERN | PROJECT 3 | 3D GRAPHICS STUDIO: GRDS-730-OL | PROFESSOR TRUDY ABADIE | MAY 16, 2010
  • Brainstorming ideas Initial Rough Drafts I spent a bit of time considering the structure of the point of purchase display for baseball cards. After seeing examples I instinctively began thinking of practical uses of the point of purchase. Due to the fact that they will change every baseball season the display would be more appropriate to be promotional than permanent. Initially I did consider an open box idea but with a more unique opening and the backside would stand higher. The second idea would need to be either hung on a wall/shelf or be some how attached to a stand to find a way to sit upright but there would be a shelf designed into a background where the shelving would standout somewhat from the background. AMANDA KERN | PROJECT 3 | 3D GRAPHICS STUDIO: GRDS-730-OL | PROFESSOR TRUDY ABADIE | MAY 16, 2010
  • Brainstorming ideas Initial Rough Drafts My third idea I considered a more unique shape for the packaging. It would be shaped into a triangle, possibly with a flattened top. In the center the point of purchase display would lower to leave room for the card packages to be stacked side by side. With each concept I thought of ease of use for customers. AMANDA KERN | PROJECT 3 | 3D GRAPHICS STUDIO: GRDS-730-OL | PROFESSOR TRUDY ABADIE | MAY 16, 2010
  • Brainstorming ideas Initial Rough Drafts I began to think more about how I could use the point of purchase differently then what was already seen during my initial research. Unique shapes and different angles and sizes could help the product get noticed. The fourth concept doesn’t seem as customer friendly after sketching it but the shape could draw customers in. The fifth sketch would enable customers to view cards from more than one perspective to reach and grab the product. Due to the cramped space where I found cards in the store this may be beneficial when multiple customers are shopping for cards. The sixth idea would be more of a floor display that could possibly have two sides to it to display cards. Not sure this large of a display is necessary for such a small product. The seventh display idea was a self feeding card system but due to the thickness of the packaging a longer one in comparison to others seen would be used. Perhaps something uniquely designed, possibly die cut to stand out the sides or top, into the front of this display may help it command attention. AMANDA KERN | PROJECT 3 | 3D GRAPHICS STUDIO: GRDS-730-OL | PROFESSOR TRUDY ABADIE | MAY 16, 2010
  • Brainstorming ideas Initial Rough Drafts My eighth idea would be a display that had a space with open slits for every package cut into the display. There would be a background behind it to match the style of the packaging display. AMANDA KERN | PROJECT 3 | 3D GRAPHICS STUDIO: GRDS-730-OL | PROFESSOR TRUDY ABADIE | MAY 16, 2010
  • Brainstorming ideas Initial Rough Drafts My ninth idea was a staggered display. Rather than the boxes being placed flat in a box they’d display on their sides on two shelves. The final idea I considered a curved front. At first it sounded like a good idea and then giving it more thought the “curve” likely wouldn’t be a great idea because the boxes would lay flat against the front of it. AMANDA KERN | PROJECT 3 | 3D GRAPHICS STUDIO: GRDS-730-OL | PROFESSOR TRUDY ABADIE | MAY 16, 2010
  • Display Mockups Initial Mockups I decided to mock up two different ideas. The first idea is an ideal solution to display and promote the product. It self feeds the package. The front and side of the packaging could work well with the typographic design on the packaging. The lengthy display reminds me of the possibilities of typography in letterpress style design. I have a lot of people ask about my set up for photos. I have a background stand and seamless paper. The paper is unrolled and a-clamps keep it in place. I use all natural light and in this set up the window/door is to the left. I do have shadows appear at times and a reflector usually works well. In this case I did not use a reflector with these photos because I had no one to assist in holding it. AMANDA KERN | PROJECT 3 | 3D GRAPHICS STUDIO: GRDS-730-OL | PROFESSOR TRUDY ABADIE | MAY 16, 2010
  • Display Mockups Initial Mockups I went with another display idea to try. This was inspired by my fifth concept sketched out. This is one side which would hold card boxes. The display is self standing and there would be another side that would be a second side identical in design. AMANDA KERN | PROJECT 3 | 3D GRAPHICS STUDIO: GRDS-730-OL | PROFESSOR TRUDY ABADIE | MAY 16, 2010
  • Display Mockups Initial Mockups This display was tedious to assemble and for the sake of ensuring it was a suitable idea I went ahead and went forward with constructing just one side to see if it would self stand and to see how the display would appear from various angles. I used equal sides for both sides and the back. If I were to use this display I’d likely increase the size of the back side of the display. I also took boxes out to see the inset of the display. I attempted to go two deep with the packaging but I don’t think it’d be functional given the width of the boxes. My biggest concern with this display is that it does seem larger than the typical card displays. Both displays were created at actual size and the products are the mockups to display for size purposes. AMANDA KERN | PROJECT 3 | 3D GRAPHICS STUDIO: GRDS-730-OL | PROFESSOR TRUDY ABADIE | MAY 16, 2010
  • Display Mockup Revision Making a revisions The feedback received on my first two ideas pushed me towards continuing with the first p.o.p. display idea I mocked up. The second idea posted problems with both size and easy of removing the product. This p.o.p. self feeds the card package. I did make changes from the first mockup. Due to the material constraints I assembled this display using two separate paper boards. I was able to modify where the gluing occurred in comparison to the first concept. I also adjusted the top tuck/flap. Originally as I was building my idea I had how the box would be assembled a bit backwards so this version seems more functional. I also added a bit of extra space at the bottom to house the cards if they were pulled outward. I felt this would be more supportive in case they began to slide forward from customers pulling the product out. I jotted down the measurements in the sketch I made as I made the final revisions. AMANDA KERN | PROJECT 3 | 3D GRAPHICS STUDIO: GRDS-730-OL | PROFESSOR TRUDY ABADIE | MAY 16, 2010
  • Display Design in progress Applying the design This is a screenshot in the midst of working on the typographic design on the p.o.p. display. I began by adding the copy from the packaging to the front and increasing the size of the type. My thoughts were to add other inspiring baseball quotes and perhaps “fan” types of thoughts to the package. Before doing so I continued to work with the original type from the package design. I felt it would be wise to stay somewhat similar, but to change it to fit the display. From a distance I think the typographic design could be found to be unique enough in comparison to grab attention. After working on the side of the package I elected to take a step back for feedback. I will likely rework the front sizes and positioning so that it’s larger and the flow of the type works with the size changes. Near the opening on the sides I may include a call out that shouts at the customer to grab some cool collector cards. AMANDA KERN | PROJECT 3 | 3D GRAPHICS STUDIO: GRDS-730-OL | PROFESSOR TRUDY ABADIE | MAY 16, 2010
  • Display Design in progress Baseball card design I thought out a few baseball card ideas. In sketches I thought more in terms of layout and placement of type and imagery. As I began to design on the computer I found imagery was limited. I began to think more typographically but realized the actual focus of the cards needed to be the imagery of baseball players so I tied in the existing branding and typography/elements in a minimalist style to create the cards. With more time the back to the cards would be designed and though the front has some typographic similarities I think seeing both sides would help tie in the design consistency with the packaging seeing how the back is where most typography is featured. AMANDA KERN | PROJECT 3 | 3D GRAPHICS STUDIO: GRDS-730-OL | PROFESSOR TRUDY ABADIE | MAY 16, 2010
  • Display Design in progress Display design revisions Here are the display design revisions. The back of the package is a separate part of the die due to the size considerations. It will be against a wall so no design is necessary on the back. REINSERTION FOR CARD DIE CUT FOR REINSERTION FOR CARD BOX DIE ACETATE SEE THRU BOX DIE AMANDA KERN | PROJECT 3 | 3D GRAPHICS STUDIO: GRDS-730-OL | PROFESSOR TRUDY ABADIE | MAY 16, 2010
  • Display Design in progress Baseball card design During the design process I took screenshots of the direction I was taking as a comparison. I considered making the illusion of packages showing through the acetate window area to potentially save cost but also to be in place if too many packages were removed from the display. I don’t quite think it’s as successful as just the display to remain open or the acetate because I’m not so sure everyone would get the concept of the design. AMANDA KERN | PROJECT 3 | 3D GRAPHICS STUDIO: GRDS-730-OL | PROFESSOR TRUDY ABADIE | MAY 16, 2010
  • P.O.P. Display Die Creating the die 4.3125” After creating the final mockup I digitally created the die that would act as the template for me to work with for the p.o.p. display. .75” .75” 1.5” 1.5” 8.125” 1.5” 1.5” 1.5” 1.5” 4” .75” .75” 1.5” 1.5” 2” 4.375” 5.75” 1.875” 1.875” Front Back 8.125” 1” 1” 8.9375” 8.75” 4.375” 2.375” 3.875” 3.875” 2.75” 2.75” 5” AMANDA KERN | PROJECT 3 | 3D GRAPHICS STUDIO: GRDS-730-OL | PROFESSOR TRUDY ABADIE | MAY 16, 2010
  • Final Display Design Baseball card point of purchase display Here’s the initial point of purchase display constructed. I used acetate to act as a window so that the customer could see the products within the display container. Besides it being a cost issue, I did find that working with acetate was problematic to ensure it had no finger prints and that the glue didn’t cross into the viewable area. This project was printed on the same french paper as my product, however, due to the time constraints it was printed on an larger format ink jet printer. AMANDA KERN | PROJECT 3 | 3D GRAPHICS STUDIO: GRDS-730-OL | PROFESSOR TRUDY ABADIE | MAY 16, 2010
  • Final Display Design Baseball card point of purchase display On both sides I created a reinsertion point for packaging. It’s likely that customers may remove a box, look at it, and if they decide against purchasing the customer has the ability to reinsert the box back into the display. AMANDA KERN | PROJECT 3 | 3D GRAPHICS STUDIO: GRDS-730-OL | PROFESSOR TRUDY ABADIE | MAY 16, 2010
  • Final Display Design Modifying the point of purchase display As I designed the baseball cards to incorporate into the point of purchase display I must admit it felt rushed conceptually and without spending a lot more time to brand the card series I recognized that it might not be wise to force including them into the point of purchase display. I though back to the packaging for companies like Chipotle where a product is rarely incorporated into any advertising and decided to modify the point of purchase display slightly with that in mind. I constructed a few additional packages to include in the display. Each package takes on average 30-45 minutes to fully assemble by hand. AMANDA KERN | PROJECT 3 | 3D GRAPHICS STUDIO: GRDS-730-OL | PROFESSOR TRUDY ABADIE | MAY 16, 2010
  • Final Display Design Modifying the point of purchase display Both sides of the display have reinsertion points and have the same typographic messaging so that if it is viewed from either angle the design could be seen. AMANDA KERN | PROJECT 3 | 3D GRAPHICS STUDIO: GRDS-730-OL | PROFESSOR TRUDY ABADIE | MAY 16, 2010
  • Final Display Design Modifying the point of purchase display As in the first display presented, this also has the reinsertion point and the acetate window. AMANDA KERN | PROJECT 3 | 3D GRAPHICS STUDIO: GRDS-730-OL | PROFESSOR TRUDY ABADIE | MAY 16, 2010
  • Final thoughts Reflecting on my point of purchase display I think the biggest challenge I faced in this project was how to maintain the consistency of the package design. I realized midway through the project that I had wished the actual product had been designed. In comparison to others in class, I choose a product that would be best designed before the packaging. So I found myself reflecting on the last project and realizing that I wished more focus was placed on branding the product and creating actual baseball card designs before focusing on the structure of the package. After spending time researching the baseball card designs of past and present I do think the current card design could potentially work but without tying in the typographic design of the back of the card it may not be as clear. The back of baseball cards typically contain statistical and biographical information, however, the front of cards are filled with My point of purchase display (above) large imagery and minimal type. Common baseball card point of purchase display at store (below) Given the space limitations I think this display concept was the most appropriate of those I conceptualized. I think it varies enough to help it stand out in comparison. As you can see from the competitors - they merely slap on a new sticker onto a generic box/container that holds the cards. Because the project was printed on an ink jet printer I do notice slight color variations, however, due to the time constraints it wasn’t realistic to screenprint. However, with more time, screenprinting is certainly a possibility for this project. AMANDA KERN | PROJECT 3 | 3D GRAPHICS STUDIO: GRDS-730-OL | PROFESSOR TRUDY ABADIE | MAY 16, 2010