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Design methodologies process book Design methodologies process book Presentation Transcript

  • DESIGN METHODOLOGY Amanda Kern | GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010
  • GRAPHIC DESIGN IS... Though the dictionary may define graphic design as a noun, referring to it as an “art or profession of using design elements”, it’s very apparent that the meaning of graphic design is quite diverse. Graphic design is a way of creating for a variety of mediums in order to visually communicate a message.
  • AT THE BEGINNING OF THE Quarter I DEFINED GRAPHIC DESIGN It’s quite intriguing to hear opinions on what other’s determine to be graphic design. One key theme that was echoed in all the responses is that graphic design involved Ultimately it involves creating projects using a variety of design elements such as visually communicating a message in order to reach an audience. It’s important to photos, illustrations, and typography to convey a message visually. In December recognize that graphic design isn’t just about making pretty pictures or designs but 2007, Veerle Pieters posted on her design blog the article, “What is graphic that communicating the message is essentially one of the most influential aspects design?” In this article we’re able to get a great perspective of the multitude of of design. Designers must refrain from thinking about what they “like” when views on the definition of graphic design. In this article Veerle Pieters requested designing and take into consideration the client’s needs and the target audience. that her readers define graphic design, without referring to a dictionary. There were Successful graphic design visually stimulates the audience in a way which often nearly 200 responses and it’s interesting hearing the honest and straight forward results in the audience taking part in a call to action. Whether the action by the opinions such as: audience be purchasing something, attending an event, or getting involved in an organization, most design visually communicates a message that does evoke a “I think Graphic Design is art used to entice.” response with the audience to do something. “To me, it’s a combination of shape, color and typography, serving a Designers have a variety of ways to achieve their designs. The designs may be specific goal, meeting the need of my customers.” created by hand, as in traditional art, computer generated, or a convergence of both. The most successful graphic design generally follow principles of graphic PRACTICAL EXERCISE 1 “Graphic design is using copy, color, and imagery to communicate an design such as hierarchy, balance, and appropriate use of grid systems, however, idea.” designers are encouraged to understand that with all rules come exceptions to the rules. Ultimately, the way in which designers design must ensure that the client’s “Graphic design is visual communication. The movement and styling of message is visually communicated successfully to the target audience. D E F I N I N G G R A P H I C D E S I G N V I S U A L LY graphics and types to communicate a message to an audience.” For the first practical exercise we were presented with a visual challenge to be solved using hand processes. In this exercise we were to create an image that was “Translating any kind of communication into a clear visual experience” a visual representation of our definition of graphic design. This was a timed exercise that we had only three hours to develop a solution. “Graphic design is orgasms for the eye.” Pieters, Veerle. “What is Graphic Design?” http://veerle.duoh.com/blog/comments/what_is_graphic_design/ Introduction: Graphic Design and Methodology. Course Unit 1. SCAD E-learning curriculum. Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010
  • { I WAS TO FOLLOW THESE Objectives PRACTICAL EXERCISE 1 The following instructions were provided at the beginning of our practical exercise. 1. You may use any non-computer technique(s) to create your visual solution. 2. There are no specific requirements regarding the format of your solution (2-D or 3-D, single or multiple-panel, etcetera). These decisions should evolve naturally from your concept. 3. You may use ONLY images (photographs, illustrations, found images or objects, et cetera) to create your visual solution. Typographic elements may be used only as images or textures. No words are to be included. 4. You have three hours to complete and post your final solution. Work GETTING Inspired not posted during the three-hour time limit will be accepted for critique In the beginning I found myself searching for visual inspiration. purposes but will receive a grade of “0.” I found a lot of interesting ways others visually communicated what they felt graphic design was. Finding inspiration helped Initially, this was a major challenge because coming into this assignment we had me get a broader idea of how others defined graphic design. no idea what we’d be challenged to design in three hours. Instinctively my mind Most concepts all related back to communicating ideas. raced through many ideas but remembered that despite the time constraints, my design process must be followed as well as I could to ensure I ended with a strong solution in the end. So I stepped back and followed my process that I will now share to help you understand my definition of graphic design and my design process a little more clearly. Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010 Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010
  • { I FOUND MYSELF Brainstorming I find with most projects I either identify key words or mind map through my process to help me identify things I need to focus on. Sometimes this helps me in finding my theme. For the first exercise I reread my essay and pulled key words that I felt were relevant and jotted down a few others that came to mind in the initial phases of this assignment. Here are words brainstormed during exercise 1: visual communication entice goal idea message visual “orgasm” client’s needs ROUGH Concepts target audience After getting inspired I began developing rough drafts to help creativity me conceptualize ideas for this exercise. I found this to be a challenge as the time constraints meant I could only spend CONCEPT 1 CONCEPT 2 CONCEPT 3 create minimal time conceptualizing to ensure I left enough time for The first concept I thought of a light bulb The light bulb idea continued through The megaphone was also something action execution of my final idea. with the light lines coming from it. The light concept 2, however, I was very influenced that came to mind as I thought of ways evoke bulb would communicate the “idea” or by my own process and realizing I only had to visually communicate the topic of response “concept” that I discussed in my definition 3 hours to complete this assignment I was “communication”. Again, the streams from light bulb of graphic design. The lines would consist reminded of the importance of deadlines it would consist of text, not necessarily deadline = clock/timer of type, not necessarily legible, but there and how much that impacts projects. I don’t legible but really to help communicate the megaphone to communicate “communication” visually. necessarily think it defines graphic design concept of communciation. but I do feel it influences it. Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010 Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010
  • { TIME TO Create I Found the most interesting idea to be using a lightbulb to help visualize the concept of how graphic design must communicate ideas effectively. In order to pull off this concept I felt the paper mache process combined with watercolor would be the best method of execution. I used ripped pieces of paper from an old book and painted a variety of yellow shades to represent the background. And build layers up until I had an adequate textured surface to work with. I suppose for me the most challenging aspect was that I used a wet media to execute this assignment. I constantly found myself drying the surface and rebuilding layers. This became more of a challenge because I had only three hours total for this exercise. DESIGN Process I began by ripping pages from an old book and painting with watercolor paint onto the ripped pages. I used a flour/water mixture to create a paper mache onto the watercolor paper. The paper was paper mached after it was watercolor painted. The process involved layering the paper The final solution used about 8 layers of I was only able to squeeze this project in mache using 2 shades of yellow and 2 paper mache as I layered the variation in just before my kids bedtime so they were shades of brown. colors to create a seamless blending in the dancing and having fun as I worked, though paper mache. my son climbed on me a number of times as I worked away trying my hardest to beat the deadline to finish this assignment. Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010 Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010
  • { THE FINAL DESIGNS Complete As I completed the final exercise I found myself reflecting on the entire process. After the timed exercise we were to create the concept digitally. I found myself challenged initially with how I would make my first practical exercise more interesting. I personally enjoyed the “hand rendered” and original end result of the first practical exercise. So though more about the purpose and for me the original idea that came to mind was that the light bulb represented an “idea” that in graphic design must be communicated. I felt as though the type was a great way to express the communication visually. For my final digital solution I used the original as a “template” so that they seemed somewhat similar. I used the original to test colors and help emulate the illustrative qualities in digital form. It was tough to replicate the overlaying of colors the same FINAL Solutions as paper mache and realized that the digital solution might look similar but would I began by ripping pages from an old book and painting with be different enough to convey my idea digitally just as successfully, I used a variety watercolor paint onto the ripped pages. I used a flour/water of photoshop brushes in varying colors and opacity to create a similar artistic mixture to create a paper mache onto the watercolor paper. appearance. Unfortunately I felt the brushes in photoshop were so much more The paper was paper mached after it was watercolor painted. limiting and constrainting than actually painting onto paper in a traditional form as I did for the first practical timed exercise. I used the type from my original paper that defined graphic design. I used a photoshop brushe to help me create a more unique “torn” selection area before carrying over the type. I intentionally created a more haphazard style to emulate the style digitally similar to paper mache. Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010 Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010
  • DESIGN METHODOLOGY LET ME EXPLAIN MY DESIGN PROCESS In graphic design, all designers develop their own individual design methodologies during the creation of projects. Rather than jumping right onto the computer and creating a project, it’s important that designers follow a healthy design process which involves research, inspiration, conceptualization and brainstorming, sketching ideas, and designing. Throughout the process it’s wise that designers share ideas with co-workers or clients in order to receive adequate feedback to ensure their project is taking the appropriate direction.
  • AT THE BEGINNING OF THE Quarter I EXPLAINED MY DESIGN METHODOLOGY For me, I always begin a project with the design brief or project description. Many “Sketching is an excellent way to quickly explore concepts. You can After reading Kathy Sierra’s article, “Creativity on speed” it all now makes sense to brainstorm creative projects. The project, titled “The Map to My Mind” involved times this may involve meeting directly or online with a client in order to get a sketch for one or two hours and work out multiple possible solutions why I work best under tight deadlines. a photo of my head surrounded by hundreds of words hand rendered that were good understanding of the project requirements. Once the constraints are defined to the design problem at hand. This is an essential step in the design my own thoughts that pass through my mind on a daily basis. Though this was a I spend time researching the competition and the company to get a better idea of process. It will save you time to work through concepts on paper before Kathy Sierra explains the reason why so many designers work well under deadline personal project, I did follow my own process, some of which I shared publicly on the market I am designing for. I also take time to get inspired in terms of design. For going to the computer.” constraints in her article: my blog. The night of the faculty show I was asked by so many “how” I executed example, if I know I am designing a page layout that will rely heavily on creative use the project so I find sharing this helps others see a sneak peak of my approach to of typography I will refer to inspiring typography design. I often reference creative Once on the computer I usually refine out my top two to three designs before sharing “One of the best ways to be truly creative--breakthrough creative--is to be a design project. projects that have nothing to do with the project I am working with, for example, my work with the client or boss. I find the review process also an imperative part forced to go fast. Really, really, really fast. From the brain’s perspective, if I am designing a brochure I don’t just get inspired by looking at other brochures I of my methodology. Critique helps me learn how I can improve and how I am able it makes sense that extreme speed can unlock creativity. When forced Ultimately a designer’s design methodology is what impacts their approach to also look at posters, web sites, and other media that might help spark my creativity. to meet the clients needs. As Kevin Cornell states in his article “Taking Critique”: to come up with something under extreme time constraints, we’re designing. In order to solve creative problems one must take a project through forced to rely on the more intuitive, subconscious parts of our brain. a design evolution of conceptualization and understand that the first idea that I find the brainstorming process one of the most important in my methodology. “If you’re creating emotional, introspective art with intellectual insight The time pressure can help suppress the logical/rational/critical parts crosses their mind may not be their best. Brainstorming for me often happens in conjunction of doing research and getting into expressionist statements, don’t expect your next-door neighbor of your brain. It helps you EQ up subconscious creativity (so-called “right inspired. At times it begins with jotting down notes but I often create word lists, who came over to borrow your plunger to have criticism as valuable brain”) and EQ down conscious thought (“left brain”).” mind maps, and sketches to help me work out ideas that come to mind. I also try to as your former teacher, or your fellow artists. Find people you trust to veer from the norm and think of ideas not necessarily related so I may take myself give you criticism; and remember that any critique is only an opinion I recently shared my creative process for a project I completed for our faculty art out of my normal working environment or go do something that may make me think — meaning some people just won’t have the background to pick up exhibition. The constraints for our faculty show was to create a self portrait that differently. Some of my best ideas come at the oddest of times - sometimes in the what you’re putting down, because they don’t have the same experiences must be square. I elected to use a mind map format because I use them so much middle of the night I wake up with an idea other times it’s in the shower. Sometimes as yourself.” my best idea come when I go somewhere I’ve never been. I find it intriguing how just going to a new environment can trigger fresh ideas. After I sketch initial idea I For me, I also find that the deadline does impact my creativity. In fact, as much as usually refine these sketches. I try not to just jump right onto the computer because I’d love to workforever on a project, I find I often times more effective and creative I find the sketching process to because as Sean Hodge states in his article about when put under a tight deadline. Deadlines sometimes do inhibit how much I am the role of sketching in the design process: able to follow the design methodology to a perfect process, however, this makes me no less creative but instead more capable to adapt to the needs of a project. Hodge, Sean. “The Role of Sketching in the Design process” http://psd.tutsplus.com/drawing/the-role-of-sketching-in-the-design-process/ Cornell, Kevin. “Taking Critique” http://www.bearskinrug.co.uk/_articles/2007/01/24/taking_critique/ Sierra, Kathy. “Creativity on Speed” http://headrush.typepad.com/creating_passionate_users/2005/12/creativity_on_s.html Kern, Amanda. “The Map to My Mind” http://amandakern.wordpress.com/2009/08/08/the-map-to-my-mind/ Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010 Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010
  • PRACTICAL EXERCISE 2 VISUALIZING MY DESIGN METHODOLOGY For the second practical exercise we were expected to use our essay about our personal design methodology to help us create a visual representation of the content. We were only permitted to use one word for each stage of our methodology. Images and textual content were permitted but were expected to share an equal role in communication. We again were timed and had just three hours to complete this practical exercise.
  • { I WAS TO FOLLOW THESE Objectives PRACTICAL EXERCISE 2 The following instructions were provided at the beginning of our practical exercise. 1. You may use any non-computer technique(s) to create your visual solution. 2. There are no specific requirements regarding the format of your solution (2-D or 3-D, single- or multiple-panel, etcetera). These decisions should evolve naturally from your concept. 3. Images and textual content should share an equal role in communication. 4. You have three hours to complete and post your final solution. Work not posted during the three-hour time limit will be accepted for critique purposes but will receive a grade of “0.” GETTING Inspired In the beginning I found myself searching for visual inspiration. I I was again challenged with the time constraint which caused my mind to race found myself searching for examples that would help inspire me through many ideas. I again stepped back and followed my process that I will now in visually communicating my design process. Examples found share to help you understand my design methodology a little more clearly. illustrate strong ideas that help visualize planning, organization and inspiring styles for this assignment. Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010 Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010
  • { I FOUND MYSELF Brainstorming I again listed key words to help me conceptualize initial ideas for this assignment. This is often times known to help me in finding my theme. For the second exercise I reread my essay and pulled key words that I felt were relevant and jotted down a few others that came to mind in the initial phases of this assignment. Here are words brainstormed during exercise 1: process direction refine research competition share inspiration variety review conceptualization wordlist opinion Concepts brainstorming mind map deadline sketching trigger creative ROUGH ideas explore speed feedback concept In the beginning stages I found myself using a mind map to help me categorize my process a little more clearly. Finding myself I refined my process down to these main sections and brainstormed a few words running out of time I contemplated a few ideas but in the end along the way. found icons would best represent the stages of my design process visually. GOALS - communication RESEARCH - paper, books, data INSPIRATION - excite me! BRAINSTORMING - conceptualization, ideas CREATE = DESIGN REVIEW - approve/disapprove REVISE - iterative process before/after review COMPLETE - implement/target Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010 Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010
  • { TIME TO Create Each graphical representation of my process was then redrawn and painted with watercolor. I began trying to paint the shapes freehand realizing that I was running out of time. As a part of my “review” and “revise” process I found after a few attempts I came closer to what I wanted when I first sketched my ideas and then painted. I found the graphical elements to be intriguing in an almost iconic format where the things that came to mind for each category were enclosed in an almost “button” shape. I love the spontaniety that the watercolor brought to the icons, however, they seemed a little rough still. So again as a part of my “review” and “revise” process I refined the logos further by building more detail with pen & ink and then overlaying the watercolor in some places with a watercolor pencil to give depth to the icons. I found the iconic buttons also gained depth by creating an ink shadow. I then hand DESIGN Process rendered type to go in conjunction with each icon created. Given the time constraints, I found it especially challenging to be “perfect” with these icons. I enjoyed seeing the original end result, however, I was disappointed not to have more time to perfect the shape and consistency in sizing and appearance of the icons created. Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010 Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010
  • { THE FINAL DESIGNS Complete Originally I was excited to be able to take my second practical exercise to the computer. It posed potential for some interesting possibilities. Once I got started I was quickly reminded of how tedious of a process icon development was. I found myself feeling as though I was creating 8 exercises, instead of just one and my ideas I had visualized digitally were more time consuming than I felt was realistically possible with the time I had remaining to complete the course. I used a combination of illustrator and photoshop to execute the icons to give them a more sketchy appearance. For the digital form I also included the type within the icon and it made this addition much more seamless than the varied sizes sketched out in the practical exercise. I found myself especially challenged with this exercise for both the practical and FINAL Solutions digital execution and after completion of both it’s a perfect example of one exercise I liked how the computer allowed me to be able to make the where I am confident with more time, review, and feedback I’d have likely been shapes of the icons in a more consistent manner, however, more successful. keeping the sketchy look proved to be less than what I had hoped for. I had hoped to still give them a “painted” look but with a digital feel. Some sketchy qualities are present but they didnt’ quite turn out how I had envisioned. Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010 Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010
  • PRACTICAL EXERCISE 3 TYPOGRAPHIC REPRESENTATION OF THE WEATHER For our third exercise we were expected to put our design methodology to practice by using the information provided in our local daily newspaper to visually, dynamically, and creatively represent the 36-hour weather forecast. We were permitted to use text or letter forms only for this assignment. Again we had just three hours to complete this assignment.
  • { I WAS TO FOLLOW THESE Objectives PRACTICAL EXERCISE 3 The following instructions were provided at the beginning of our practical exercise. 1. You may use any non-computer technique(s) to create your visual solution. 2. There are no specific requirements regarding the format of your solution (2-D or 3-D, single or multiple-panel, etcetera). These decisions should evolve naturally from your concept. 3. You may use text or letterforms only (no images). 4. You have three hours to complete and post your final solution. Work not posted during the three-hour time limit will be accepted for critique purposes but will receive a grade of “0.” GETTING Inspired I again searched for visual inspiration. The following are a It’s easy to feel challenged in timed assignments, however, by the third timed few examples that I reviewed while researching inspiration. exercise I found myself to be in more of a rhythm with following my process when Examples found illustrate strong ideas that help typography challenged by time. I found myself more excited about exercise three because it communicate an image or message visually. I also found was a little more focused on a topic and involved typography. examples of weather icons useful in getting inspired. Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010 Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010
  • { I FOUND MYSELF Brainstorming Once again I found myself identifying key words that helped me get started with this practical exercise. weather 3-day latest events rain forecast changing cloudy Florida weather watch sunny movement report thunderstorms freeflowing new lightening cold front update news seasonal I created rough drafts for this exercise as part of the brainstroming process. Some of the ideas I came up with involved a visual representation of the forecast with ROUGH Concepts type which included type hand rendered in a way that created the iconic visual for I used the local newspaper to help me identify the three day the forecast. One idea I had was to use words related to the weather to make up weather forecast. It became a huge inspiration for me working the visual. I also considered using the news headlines as the type. I considered on this assignment. In the end I found myself using many of using watercolor first and then the type on top of the watercolor. I felt this process the headlines and type from within the newspaper. A few rough wouldn’t have been wise due to the time constraints. I thought about also cutting ideas helped me get moving towards my final solution. out newspaper to form the weather icons. Also torn paper paper mache was another idea to create the weather icons, however, seeing how that was my approach for the first exercise I strayed away from it for this exercise. Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010 Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010
  • { THE FINAL DESIGNS Complete Practical exercise 3 I had a lot of fun with. I’ve always enjoyed hand rendering type so I have to admit that the hands on portion of this exercise was far more exciting for me. It allowed me to create the letters a little more freely and artistically than on the computer. For the first forecast that was “drier, some sun” I used a similar icon to what I found in the newspaper but the hand rendered type made up the icon. I used headlines and type found in the newspaper to make the icon. For the second forecast I again used headlines to create the iconic representation for a thunderstorm. I focused more heavily on impactful headlines. For the third forecast I found the U.S war statistics an intriguing representation to represent rain. I focused on statistics and impactful war related type. FINAL Solutions As much as I enjoyed the hand rendering of type, I found myself again excited to It was very tedious positioning, resizing, rotating this much type move to the digital development of this exercise, however, after starting I was digitally on the computer. By the time I finished I found myself quickly reminded how tedious the process of using typography in a more creative remembering how much MORE fun I had creating these exercises form could be. I think if I had a lot more time on hand this could have really been by hand than in digital form. This exercise again reminded me exciting to push the type further to a three dimensional digital form. I found it a that creating something digitally doesn’t necessarily make the little tougher to fill the spaces as I did by hand because of the rigidness digital type solution better. can become in layout. It was very tedious positioning, resizing, rotating this much type. By the time I finished I found myself remembering how much MORE fun I had creating these exercises by hand than in digital form. I found it a little tougher to fill the spaces as I did by hand because of the rigidness digital type can become in layout. Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010 Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010
  • PRACTICAL EXERCISE 4 MY VISUAL REPRESENTATION OF A QUOTATION For our fourth exercise we were expected to visually represent a random quote that was presented to us when we began the exercise. The quote I was presented with for this exercise was “More is Less”. I was challenged with how I’d visually represent this both with text and imagery.
  • { I WAS TO FOLLOW THESE Objectives PRACTICAL EXERCISE 4 The following instructions were provided at the beginning of our practical exercise. 1. You may use any non-computer technique(s) to create your visual solution. 2. There are no specific requirements regarding the format of your solution (2-D or 3-D, single or multiple-panel, etcetera). These decisions should evolve naturally from your concept. 3. You must integrate text and image(s) to effectively communicate the content of the text intended by the author. Your typographic and image integration should be well balanced, completing the narrative together. 4. The quote should be included in the final solution. It should not, however, be GETTING Inspired the primary focal point of the final solution. I began by researching a little more about the quote I was assigned. The following notes were taken to help me as I 5. You have three hours to complete and post your final solution. Work conceptualized my solution. An initial search for the origins not posted during the three-hour time limit will be accepted for critique of the quote “More is less” instantly brought up a lot of purposes but will receive a grade of “0.” “minimalist” topics and I learned that the quote was made by artist, Ad Reinhardt. I began getting inpired by looking at Ad Reinhardt’s artwork as well as work of abstract expressionists. Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010 Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010
  • { I FOUND MYSELF Brainstorming I again identified key words that helped me get started with this practical exercise. more is less more) confused ad reinhardt free form disorder chaos color field disarray clutter crowd anarchy paint busy turmoil abstract traffic confusion cup (full) geometric scale (representing noise This assignment was definitely a challenge when I first began. I often times begin the brainstroming and getting inspired part of my process at around the same time. So before I learned that Ad Reinhardt was the originator of this quote I was stumped ROUGH Concepts at how I’d visually execute this one. I instantly thought of a cup overflowing or I created a few rough drafts to help me in the conceptualization crowds. As I learned more about Ad Reinhardt and his efforts in the minimalist process for this assignment. Initially when reading the quote movement I felt it appropriate to create a visual piece that would emulate his style I thought of how the quote “more is less” made me think of and also help relate to the quote itself. size and capacity. I thought of a cup overfilling as well as a scale. Those ideas seemed too typical so after doing my research further about Ad Reinhardt I felt as though it might be interesting to experiment with some of the styles of his abstract work for this assignment. Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010 Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010
  • { THE FINAL DESIGNS Complete Not knowing the expectations beginning this assignment left me unprepared with supplies I really hoped to paint abstractly onto canvas. Unfortunately I only had watercolor paper so the application didn’t quite turn out as I expected. But I painted abtractly and found the contrasts in color to create a sense of “chaos” and “busy” movements that reminded me of what the quote was really intending to mean when read. I added in white acrylic paint for the words. I had hoped for the paint to “drip” to make the text but that too didn’t quite turn out like I expected. It instead was painted on in thick strokes so it doesn’t quite have the appearance that it was “dripped” onto the canvas as many abstract painters are remembered for. However, it does have a bit of a busy feel to it, especially when used against the chaotic background created. For my digital version of this exercise I used the original design and the work of FINAL Solutions Reinhardt as inspiration. I decided to try to emulate paint strokes more freely in In the end the this exercise proved to be fun. The hands photoshop using some of the colors from the original exercise. I layered the paint on portion was tougher to control, especially under a time brushes and attempted to create a chaotic solution that would help me represent constraint and not be prepared with all materials prior to that “more” is really “less” in art and design. I’m hoping when viewed the painting knowing what to expect for this assignment. The digital portion in the background gives a sense of disorder and clutter to help you stay reminded of this assignment was defintely less “messy”, however, I found that adding more to a piece of art or design doesn’t necessarily make it better. it challenging because the process to find, load and use a large variety of brushes can be more time consuming and tedious. To finish the piece I used a script type that would remind the viewer of handwriting. Though I gave it a “painted” appearance, it’s very obvious that By keeping it white it helped add enough contrast to help it stand out against the the paint strokes are digital. They are very clean and perfected art work. A slight drop shadow helped make it a little more legible against the in comparison to the original. painted surface. Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010 Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010
  • A FEW FINAL Reflections Throughout this quarter this course helped me think more in depth to the actual Despite the intense time constraints I was placed under to complete this course, meaning of graphic design. To me this definition ultimately involves not a “cool” I was again reminded of the quote by Kathy Sierra that in included in my original design, nor something that we necessarily enjoy creating. instead, graphic design essay about my design methodology: involves creating something that will communicate an idea and serve a purpose. In the end all design has some type of goal that must be met and it’s our job as “One of the best ways to be truly creative--breakthrough creative--is to be designers to ensure the goals are met. forced to go fast. Really, really, really fast. From the brain’s perspective, it makes sense that extreme speed can unlock creativity. When forced This course also helped me think about paying closer attention to my own design to come up with something under extreme time constraints, we’re process. Creating the exercises this semester were definitely great practice to forced to rely on the more intuitive, subconscious parts of our brain. follow my own methodologies as I created each one. I found I almost always The time pressure can help suppress the logical/rational/critical parts followed a process that involved understanding the goals of a project, conducting of your brain. It helps you EQ up subconscious creativity (so-called “right research, conceptualizing and brainstorming, getting inspired, creating, reviewing, brain”) and EQ down conscious thought (“left brain”).” revising, and completing a process. Often times some of these phases of a project would overlap with one another, especially as time constraints played a factor in And this quarter I was forced to go really fast to complete this course on time. I the design of the assignments. have no doubt that the time constraints heavily influenced my work. So as I now conclude this book defining my design methodology I think the one thing I take One of the greatest influences on my design process was certainly time. Though away from this, and hope others do also, is that you must find it in yourself to time may have limited me somewhat, I found that it did not completely deter me follow your own design process as best as you can, regardless of time. Does time from following my process. I was especially challenged with this course’s time affect the end result of a project? Absolutely. Has time influenced my process this constraints after missing over 75% of the course due to medical problems. After semester? Absolutely. Could I have improved my process or my course work this being granted permission to continue the course after the quarter ended, I still quarter? Absolutely. For me, that’s really the one thing that I really leave this course found myself challenged more than ever before to design under pressure to ensure learning most — that you make the most of the time you have to execute the i met the goals of the course. I have no doubt if I had been able to invest the same design solutions you’ve conceptualized with the realization that there is ALWAYS time as a normal quarter that my solutions may have been far different, and likely room for improvement. improved, from what they are now. Amanda Kern || GRDS-705-OL1 Design Methodology || Professor John De Vylder || Savannah College of Art & Design || February 7, 2010