A. Rose by any other name A new approach to name authority Amanda Hill @mandahill JISC Conference, 2010
The Names Project <ul><li>‘ From the Annals of the Onomastic Society’ </li></ul><ul><li>Ian Watson (1990) </li></ul>JISC C...
Rhyming couples JISC Conference, 2010
JISC Conference, 2010
 
JISC Conference, 2010 http://www.pryers-solicitors.co.uk/blog/clinical-negligence-news/mix-up-leads-to-surgeons-operating-...
Academic impact <ul><li>Immunologist </li></ul><ul><li>Alexandra Nicole Rose  </li></ul>JISC Conference, 2010 http://www.f...
Forms of name <ul><li>Rose, A. N. </li></ul><ul><li>Alexandra Rose </li></ul><ul><li>A. N. Rose </li></ul><ul><li>Alexandr...
http://separatedbyacommonlanguage.blogspot.com/2009/08/initials-and-names.html
Background <ul><li>Repositories Programme </li></ul><ul><li>People depositing copies of their papers, learning materials, ...
What? <ul><li>Names of people involved in creating materials </li></ul><ul><li>Names of institutions and (perhaps) departm...
Retrieval <ul><li>Users/administrators/funders may want to find all articles by a particular individual </li></ul><ul><ul>...
Disambiguation <ul><li>Need to retrieve  only  those materials deposited by that particular individual </li></ul><ul><li>W...
What is the Names Project? <ul><li>A JISC-funded Mimas project in collaboration with the British Library </li></ul><ul><li...
JISC Conference, 2010 Mimas British Library Millions of names of active researchers   Only initials, not full forenames  
Process <ul><li>Use Zetoc to pre-populate the Names system </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify unique individuals and assign id...
Names Phase One Activities <ul><li>Establish requirements </li></ul><ul><li>Determine data structure </li></ul><ul><li>Map...
Current phase <ul><li>Testing matching algorithms </li></ul><ul><li>Reviewing data structure </li></ul><ul><li>Updating da...
Demo <ul><li>http://names.mimas.ac.uk/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://names.mimas.ac.uk/script-test-two/   </li></ul>JISC Confer...
JISC Conference, 2010
RDF version of record JISC Conference, 2010
JISC Conference, 2010
Longer term <ul><li>Allow researchers to edit their own information (e.g. to specify a preferred form of name) </li></ul><...
Broader context <ul><li>Lots of activity in this area right now </li></ul><ul><ul><li>ORCID (Open Researcher Contributor I...
Names matter… <ul><li>In 2000 there were seven people in the USA with the name Robert Pattinson.  howmanyofme.com </li></u...
Project updates <ul><li>Names website:  http://names.mimas.ac.uk </li></ul><ul><li>Project blog: </li></ul><ul><li>http://...
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A. Rose by any other name

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The Names Project, as presented at Internet Librarian International, 15 October 2010.

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  • Mr Chang whose interest is in collecting surnames from the members of the present day Onomastic Society. It transpires that Mr Chang is a time-traveller, who has come back from a point a quarter of a million years in the future, where everyone has the same surname. I think my friend wanted me to call the project the Chang project. But I decided that it might take a bit too much explaining, so I went for the rather more boring and descriptive name that you see here. Having said that, I must say that I don’t find names boring at all. They are a fascinating aspect of our identity and people nearly always have stories relating to them. For example, My family used to go in for rhyming couples – my parents were Bill and Jill and we had a set of elderly cousins called Horace and Doris.
  • In my family, we seemed to go in for rhyming couples – on the left we have Doris and Horace and on the right are my parents, Bill and Jill. You may be relieved to learn that they do not share my surname. So, names can be entertaining - they can also be problematic. I explained to my dad about Amazon wish lists one year and sent him the link to mine so that he could order me a book for my birthday. With the confidence only a novice Internet user will show, he ignored my link and did a search on Amazon for wish lists under my name. When he found an Amanda Hill who lived in Sale, Cheshire, he was sure that he’d got the right one. I’m sure you know where this story is going. I received three mildly interesting books which weren’t on my list. A quick look at Amazon’s wish list today shows the extent of the problem with my name:
  • 38 hits for Amanda Hill. I had a look to see what I might receive if my father made the same mistake today…
  • Name mix-up – a little inconvenient for me, in that I ended up with three books I didn’t really want. More inconvenient still for the other Amanda Hill who lived in Sale – her books had been removed from her wish list as purchased, but I had no way of explaining to her what had happened. I still worry that she’s sitting up there in Sale, wondering who bought her books for her and whether she’s ever going to get them.
  • In this case, sharing a name with someone else is really a life or death issue. In the Names project, our main area of concern is with the reputations of UK researchers and research institutions. Perhaps not quite life or death, but maybe sink or swim, especially in these straitened times.
  • She’s never written a book, so there isn’t a traditional library authority file for her. She might also be known as Lexie to the clients she visited while funding her way through her PhD. But we don’t need to go into that here.
  • Linked data principles Use uniform resource identifiers as names for things Use HTTP URIs so people can look them up Provide useful information at the URI Include links to other URIs so they can discover more things
  • Mimas/BL – collaboration might make you think of a successful mimas service – the Zetoc table of contents service, which holds data about articles in thousands of journals. And, as a consequence, the names of active researchers.
  • Other sources of data – e.g. RAE 2008 data now available on web.
  • A still from one of a series of video sketches by a group called ‘The Great Samaritans’. I saw it on the home page of the Twitpic service a few weeks ago and immediately went to howmanyofme.com to see how many Robert Pattinsons there might be in the US. Only seven.
  • A. Rose by any other name

    1. 1. A. Rose by any other name A new approach to name authority Amanda Hill @mandahill JISC Conference, 2010
    2. 2. The Names Project <ul><li>‘ From the Annals of the Onomastic Society’ </li></ul><ul><li>Ian Watson (1990) </li></ul>JISC Conference, 2010
    3. 3. Rhyming couples JISC Conference, 2010
    4. 4. JISC Conference, 2010
    5. 6. JISC Conference, 2010 http://www.pryers-solicitors.co.uk/blog/clinical-negligence-news/mix-up-leads-to-surgeons-operating-on-wrong-patient/
    6. 7. Academic impact <ul><li>Immunologist </li></ul><ul><li>Alexandra Nicole Rose </li></ul>JISC Conference, 2010 http://www.flickr.com/photos/nitsrejk/42284247/
    7. 8. Forms of name <ul><li>Rose, A. N. </li></ul><ul><li>Alexandra Rose </li></ul><ul><li>A. N. Rose </li></ul><ul><li>Alexandra N. Rose </li></ul><ul><li>Rose, Alexandra N. </li></ul><ul><li>Rose, Alexandra Nicole </li></ul><ul><li>Rose, Alexandra </li></ul><ul><li>Alexandra Nicole Rose </li></ul>JISC Conference, 2010 And these are all spelt correctly!
    8. 9. http://separatedbyacommonlanguage.blogspot.com/2009/08/initials-and-names.html
    9. 10. Background <ul><li>Repositories Programme </li></ul><ul><li>People depositing copies of their papers, learning materials, slides in institutional and subject-based digital repositories </li></ul><ul><li>Need to add name (and other) data to the digital object for information retrieval </li></ul>JISC Conference, 2010
    10. 11. What? <ul><li>Names of people involved in creating materials </li></ul><ul><li>Names of institutions and (perhaps) departments </li></ul>JISC Conference, 2010
    11. 12. Retrieval <ul><li>Users/administrators/funders may want to find all articles by a particular individual </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Difficult if the name has been entered in a variety of ways </li></ul></ul>JISC Conference, 2010
    12. 13. Disambiguation <ul><li>Need to retrieve only those materials deposited by that particular individual </li></ul><ul><li>With common names, there will be many matches – loss of precision </li></ul><ul><li>Need to be able to uniquely identify individuals </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ideally using principles of Linked Data </li></ul></ul>JISC Conference, 2010
    13. 14. What is the Names Project? <ul><li>A JISC-funded Mimas project in collaboration with the British Library </li></ul><ul><li>Phase 1 (July 2007 – February 2009): </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Investigated the potential and requirements for a Name Authority Service </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A prototype was developed with test set of data </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Phase 2: (March 2009 – February 2011): </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Expand prototype into pilot system </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Look at future options as a service </li></ul></ul>JISC Conference, 2010
    14. 15. JISC Conference, 2010 Mimas British Library Millions of names of active researchers  Only initials, not full forenames 
    15. 16. Process <ul><li>Use Zetoc to pre-populate the Names system </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify unique individuals and assign identifiers </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Enhance data with information from other sources </li></ul><ul><ul><li>e.g. UKPMC grantees database </li></ul></ul>JISC Conference, 2010
    16. 17. Names Phase One Activities <ul><li>Establish requirements </li></ul><ul><li>Determine data structure </li></ul><ul><li>Map to existing name-related standards (e.g. MARC, EAC-CPF, CERIF, FOAF) </li></ul>JISC Conference, 2010
    17. 18. Current phase <ul><li>Testing matching algorithms </li></ul><ul><li>Reviewing data structure </li></ul><ul><li>Updating data mappings for revised and new standards </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborating with potential data providers and Names users </li></ul>JISC Conference, 2010
    18. 19. Demo <ul><li>http://names.mimas.ac.uk/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://names.mimas.ac.uk/script-test-two/ </li></ul>JISC Conference, 2010
    19. 20. JISC Conference, 2010
    20. 21. RDF version of record JISC Conference, 2010
    21. 22. JISC Conference, 2010
    22. 23. Longer term <ul><li>Allow researchers to edit their own information (e.g. to specify a preferred form of name) </li></ul><ul><li>Arrange for upload of information from </li></ul><ul><ul><li>universities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>repositories </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>funding bodies </li></ul></ul>JISC Conference, 2010
    23. 24. Broader context <ul><li>Lots of activity in this area right now </li></ul><ul><ul><li>ORCID (Open Researcher Contributor Identifier) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>VIAF & WorldCat Identities(OCLC) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ISNI (International Standard Name Identifier) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Various national initiatives in other countries </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Netherlands </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Norway </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Australia </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>New Zealand </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Poland/Spain (under consideration) </li></ul></ul></ul>JISC Conference, 2010
    24. 25. Names matter… <ul><li>In 2000 there were seven people in the USA with the name Robert Pattinson. howmanyofme.com </li></ul>JISC Conference, 2010 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=23A0qzm374g
    25. 26. Project updates <ul><li>Names website: http://names.mimas.ac.uk </li></ul><ul><li>Project blog: </li></ul><ul><li>http://namesproject.wordpress.com </li></ul><ul><li>Twitter: @NamesProject </li></ul>JISC Conference, 2010

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