An Introduction to  Ontological Modeling Laura Baker, Amanda Goodman, Martha Parker LIS 688 Metadata
“ When we enter metadata we can focus on exactly what we know and not have to try to anticipate every way someone might wa...
What is Ontology? A “vocabulary of  interrelated   terms which  impose a structure   for the domain and  constrain  the po...
What is a Domain?  An area of study or a subject area.
Ontologies Include… <ul><li>Controlled Vocabularies </li></ul><ul><li>Thesauri </li></ul><ul><li>Classification Schemes </...
Four Classes <ul><li>Verbal </li></ul><ul><li>Logic-based </li></ul><ul><li>Structural (object) </li></ul><ul><li>Hybrid <...
Ontologies Express Relationships Temporal. Positional. Causal.
Background <ul><li>Keyword searches are popular but lack precision. </li></ul><ul><li>Metadata terms are disregarded thank...
Literature Review
Ontologies can be Misrepresentative <ul><li>What is left out is as important as what is included. </li></ul><ul><li>The re...
The Umbrella of Knowledge Management <ul><li>Legacy management of knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Different formats </li></ul>...
Knowledge Lens <ul><li>Simplifies ontology  </li></ul><ul><li>Focuses on the essential  </li></ul>
The Importance of Being Contextual What device is being used to access the information?
Ontology Management  Systems <ul><li>The SnoBase system manages ontologies  </li></ul><ul><li>in database tables. </li></u...
Specific Application  CIDOC Conceptual Reference Model
CRM History <ul><li>Developed by the CIDOC Documentations Standards  </li></ul><ul><li>Working Group and CIDOC CRM SIG  </...
Object Association Information Element  Relationships <ul><li>For-actual instance of use </li></ul><ul><li>General use-act...
CRM Constraints: An Example Constraints are intended to maintain a level of focus so that the ontology doesn’t expand inde...
Final Thoughts <ul><li>Positives:   </li></ul><ul><li>Relationships between defined vocabularies </li></ul><ul><li>Potenti...
Image Credits <ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/melodysk/499419404/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/melo...
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An Introduction to Onological Modeling

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  • In more simple terms, an ontology is a set of terms and their definitions. An ontology is generally domain specific in that it defines a shared vocabulary about a specific domain.
  • When stated in our paper: “An ontology is generally domain specific in that it defines a shared vocabulary about a specific domain.”. (area of study or subject area).
  • Verbal ontologies are informal and can include a thesaurus of concepts and relationships or a subject domain glossary of terms. Logic-based ontologies are defined formally and can be designed to encode schema (metadata) and non-schema information. Logic-based models continue to evolve with Semantic web development. Structural ontologies are used for describing images without keywords.  For example terms in a structural ontology can include image descriptors like intensity-(luminance, green-red, blue-yellow), position- (vertical axis-high, middle, low) (horizontal axis-left, middle right), and size (small, medium, and large) and shape (little oblong, moderately oblong, very oblong). Hybrid ontologies are a mix of the other three.
  • Ontologies can express more relationships than hierarchical taxonomies including temporal (A happens before B), positional (A is near B), and causal (A creates B).
  • While evaluating the results of Google searches we have derived that ontologies help make sense of the unstructured nature of information on the Web. Ontological modeling is a recent concept with continual evolution stages from XML usage to exchange data to RDF creation to add metadata info to web documents to web ontology language (OWL) which is the new W3C technology that allows for the construction of significantly more complex relationships . Ontological modeling is a topic that continues to develop as communities create models to support their domains. The power of ontologies comes from the development of relationships between defined vocabularies to aid in the access and description of resources.
  • The literature review of thirteen sources has aid us in better understanding the new concepts within ontological models such as the misrepresentation of ontologies, knowledge management, knowledge lens, the importance of context and ontology management systems. These six concepts will be covered in the following slides.
  • In the journal article, “Knowledge representation with ontologies: Present challenges--Future possibilities” by Brewster and O’Hara, its stated that although ontological models are created with the goal to represent knowledge and the relationships between things and ideas, “ontologies can only display components of relationships which were input into the system. If details are omitted, relationships cannot be generated or displayed”. In other words if the data or relationships are inaccurate or corrupt so does the system.
  • “ KM tackles issues such as how to manage knowledge across different platforms throughout time as the systems are upgraded, realizing that knowledge comes in many different formats, that linguistically people may refer to the same concept with different names, as well as what type of knowledge is being looked at--- “hard facts vs. rough estimations, strict rules vs. fuzzy recommendations, shallow brainstorming vs. validated experience” (Apostolou, Mentzas, &amp; Abecker, 2008-2009)”. Within KM there are related areas worth considering like information sharing, the semantic web, individual knowledge, hierarchical knowledge (organizational), and knowledge object. All these concepts aiming at developing relationships between defined vocabularies to assist in the access and description of resources.
  • The amount of information to create an ontology can be overwhelming but a knowledge lens during the creation of an ontology works as a filter that can be used to strip out the unneeded details and instead focus only on the essential. The knowledge lens simplifies the ontology and delivers expediency and accuracy of information retrieval.
  • Context in this project refers to whether information is being accessed via stationary (i.e. desktop) or mobile computing and understanding the difference. An example could be retrieving data on a desktop in comparison to receiving data through a mobile device. Let say a paramedic needs to know the allergy report of a patient who is in route from the scene of an accident to the operating room.
  • As ontologies grow, they need to be managed.
  • As mentioned previously ontologies are often domain specific with applications in business, cultural institutions and education. Current discussion in the field of library and information science makes connections between ontological models and digital libraries. The CIDOC Conceptual Reference Model (CRM) is an ontological model providing “definitions and a formal structure for describing the implicit and explicit concepts and relationships used in cultural heritage documentation“
  • It has been developed over the past ten years by the CIDOC Documentations Standards Working Group and CIDOC CRM SIG working groups. The project began by creating a Relational Data Model for museums with a focus on information exchange. However, after meeting in 1996, it was decided to create an object-oriented approach that would be able to deal with the “diversity and complexity of data structures in the domain” (CIDOC, 2006). The first edition of the CRM was completed in 1999.
  • The intent behind this model is to provide a “common and extensible framework that any cultural heritage information can be mapped to” (CIDOC, 2006). The CRM document provides a detailed correlation of the CIDOC Information categories and the CIDOC CRM and shows the complexity of the model. For example the Object Association Information element includes relationships of: for-actual instance of use, as general use-activity type, made for-event instance (intended use), and intended for-activity type (intended use). This model allows for interoperability among cultural heritage information published by museums, libraries, and archives.
  • The CRM has a specified a scope definition for the CRM model in order to clarify what is and what is not covered within the ontology. These constraints are intended to maintain a level of focus so that the ontology doesn’t expand indefinitely. The intended scope and practical scope further defines the model. For example, cultural heritage collections are defined as, “all types of materials collected and displayed by museums and related institutions as defined by the International Council of Museums (ICOM).” Included within this definition are: sites and monuments relating to natural history, ethnography, archaeology, historic monuments, as well as collections of fine and applied arts. This model covers detailed description of individual items within collections as well as entire collections. However, information that relates to personnel, accounting, or visitor statistics of cultural heritage institutions falls outside the intended scope (CIDOC, 2006). The CRM model seeks to serve as a guide for good conceptual modeling and, in fact, has served as a model for additional ontologies related to cultural heritage materials.
  • Ontological modeling is a topic that continues to develop as communities create models to support their domains. The power of ontologies comes from the development of relationships between defined vocabularies to aid in the access and description of resources. Currently there is a lack of established methodology on evaluating ontology models and is, therefore, an open research issue that will prompt more discussion and impact future practice. (Pattuelli, 2011). While ontological models have the potential to improve precision for query results, as yet many librarians and information technologists have not made the transition to semantic digital libraries. Lack of resources and knowledge combined with the fact that semantic web tools and standards vary in terms of maturity and performance, are challenges that librarians face. However, the use of ontologies within semantic web allows users to explore content“ in ways that were either not possible or not easy to do with other library systems” (Powell, 2010).
  • An Introduction to Onological Modeling

    1. 1. An Introduction to Ontological Modeling Laura Baker, Amanda Goodman, Martha Parker LIS 688 Metadata
    2. 2. “ When we enter metadata we can focus on exactly what we know and not have to try to anticipate every way someone might want to use the metadata.” -- Brian Lowe
    3. 3. What is Ontology? A “vocabulary of interrelated terms which impose a structure for the domain and constrain the possible interpretation terms.” (Kalinichenko, 2003)
    4. 4. What is a Domain? An area of study or a subject area.
    5. 5. Ontologies Include… <ul><li>Controlled Vocabularies </li></ul><ul><li>Thesauri </li></ul><ul><li>Classification Schemes </li></ul><ul><li>Taxonomies </li></ul><ul><li>Topic maps </li></ul><ul><li>Frame language </li></ul><ul><li>Logical theories </li></ul>
    6. 6. Four Classes <ul><li>Verbal </li></ul><ul><li>Logic-based </li></ul><ul><li>Structural (object) </li></ul><ul><li>Hybrid </li></ul>Different models are used by different communities.
    7. 7. Ontologies Express Relationships Temporal. Positional. Causal.
    8. 8. Background <ul><li>Keyword searches are popular but lack precision. </li></ul><ul><li>Metadata terms are disregarded thanks to spammers. </li></ul><ul><li>Ontology enrich simple search strategies by defining relationships. </li></ul>
    9. 9. Literature Review
    10. 10. Ontologies can be Misrepresentative <ul><li>What is left out is as important as what is included. </li></ul><ul><li>The relationships represented “provides a particular </li></ul><ul><li>perspective on the world” (Brewster & O’Hara, 2007). </li></ul><ul><li>Errors can spread from one ontology to another if combined. </li></ul><ul><li>Ontologies are a surrogate for real world objects and relationships. </li></ul>
    11. 11. The Umbrella of Knowledge Management <ul><li>Legacy management of knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Different formats </li></ul><ul><li>One concept, many names </li></ul><ul><li>Types of knowledge </li></ul>Related Areas <ul><li>Information sharing </li></ul><ul><li>Semantic web </li></ul><ul><li>Individual knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Hierarchical knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge objects </li></ul>
    12. 12. Knowledge Lens <ul><li>Simplifies ontology </li></ul><ul><li>Focuses on the essential </li></ul>
    13. 13. The Importance of Being Contextual What device is being used to access the information?
    14. 14. Ontology Management Systems <ul><li>The SnoBase system manages ontologies </li></ul><ul><li>in database tables. </li></ul><ul><li>Can be searched with simple SQL queries. </li></ul><ul><li>Does not require new equipment </li></ul>
    15. 15. Specific Application CIDOC Conceptual Reference Model
    16. 16. CRM History <ul><li>Developed by the CIDOC Documentations Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Working Group and CIDOC CRM SIG </li></ul><ul><li>Created relational data model for museums </li></ul><ul><li>In 1996 focus changed to an object-oriented approach </li></ul><ul><li>First CRM completed in 1999 </li></ul>
    17. 17. Object Association Information Element Relationships <ul><li>For-actual instance of use </li></ul><ul><li>General use-activity type </li></ul><ul><li>Made for-event </li></ul><ul><li>Intended for-activity type </li></ul>
    18. 18. CRM Constraints: An Example Constraints are intended to maintain a level of focus so that the ontology doesn’t expand indefinitely. Cultural Heritage Collections “ All types of materials collected and displayed by museums and Related institutions as defined by the International Council of Museums.” (CIDOC, 2006).
    19. 19. Final Thoughts <ul><li>Positives: </li></ul><ul><li>Relationships between defined vocabularies </li></ul><ul><li>Potential to improve precision for query results </li></ul><ul><li>Negatives: </li></ul><ul><li>No established evaluation techniques </li></ul><ul><li>Not many digital libraries are semantic </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of resources and knowledge </li></ul>
    20. 20. Image Credits <ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/melodysk/499419404/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/melodysk/499473826/in/photostream / </li></ul><ul><li>http://ecommons.cornell.edu/bitstream/1813/5370/1 </li></ul><ul><li>/ontologies.MWG.20070216.ppt </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/jrguillaumin/3419172904/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/stolidsoul/433082097/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/ken_from_md/4969123149/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/navdeepraj/504596529/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/franklin_hunting/2954700555/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/jim-sf/3391348814/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/julietteculver/4615763263/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/wwworks/4632864373/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/chelseafarmersmarket/4572046793/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnfahertyphotography/2675723448/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/essjay/4361793502 </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/fenoswin/5654091521/ </li></ul>
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