Communication & the art of delivering presentation

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  • Presentation is a form of communication.But it is far from being simple communication, and frequently require additional skills of persuasion and influence.Presentation is a structured communication based on the actual audience’s needs in order to achieve a certain purpose within a given timeframe, where the overall goals are providing information and promoting ideas.
  • Communication starts with a sender and a receiver. The sender formulates ideas into a message intended to draw out a response from the receiver. In this stage, called encoding, the sender puts the message into a format that the receiver can recognize and understand. In other words, the sender encodes the message using language, words, pictures, actions, symbols, and events that are meaningful to the receiver. In interpersonal communications, the message can take the form of written, verbal, and nonverbal communication. In marketing communications, the encoded message can take also the form of brand messages, advertisements, press releases, signage, and sales scripts. Noise. Unfortunately, the information sent is not necessarily the information received. All communication takes place in environments containing distractions that hinder successful communications. This “noise” can severely hinder successful communication if not addressed and minimized. In interpersonal communications, common sources of noise include other conversations, ringing telephones, blasting boom boxes, traffic, and crying children. Feedback : By soliciting and properly decoding feedback, a sender can understand whether and how the message was received, and to what degree it was effective. This allows the sender an opportunity to adjust the message to better match the receiver’s needs.Source : http://www.elliemae.com/newsletter/february2006/sub_communication.html
  • Know your audience and understand its perspective. Whether your goal is persuasion, or simply to inform, you need to understand your audience, its level of expertise and how your message will resonate. Crafting a presentation for a group of high school interns would be very different compared to an executive report to management, pitching a sales idea, or addressing a hostile audience about why the company needs to cut benefits. 2Research thoroughly. You absolutely must be an expert on the subject. Okay, you don’t have to be the world’s leading authority, but you have to know the critical facts as well as much of the little-known information. Just talking about things everybody already knows is a recipe for boredom. It’s not at all unusual to spend weeks, or months, getting the facts, alternate opinions and comments from reputable sources as well as what the general community may think. 3Document your sources. Where you get your information is as important as the information itself. Without solid, peer-reviewed data, you’re just a person with an opinion. The audience, in this exercise, is expecting facts and projections. Your personal opinion may very well be important but it must not be the only thing you present. You won’t be listing the sources ad nauseum (you will bore them silly) but you do want to be able to give citations when asked. 4Write your speech. Off-the-cuff talks are fine if you’re on a soap box in a park. In a large room with hundreds of attendees, you just can’t afford that. You might not exactly "read" the speech, but that’s certainly not uncommon, especially if you’re going to be using a teleprompter. Print the speech in large print so you can easily see it at a glance without appearing to read from it. You want to give the appearance of talking to the audience instead of reading to them, but you also want the words and phrases to be precise and predetermined. 5Prepare the slide show. If you're going to use a slide show, the visuals you will show to the audience need to be designed to support what you’re saying. Avoid showing a slide that has an inordinate amount of detail – the visuals are for impact. A spreadsheet with dozens of rows and columns will be basically meaningless. Titles on the slide should reflect the content of the slide and support what you’re saying. Do not read the slide! Assume the audience can read. The visuals should support your words, not duplicate them. There are very few things you can do that will have a worse impact than reading what the audience can read on their own. If all you’re going to do is put up slides and repeat what’s on them, then they don’t need you. PowerPoint slides, overhead projectors, blackboards, and whiteboards are "visual aids" and should be treated as such. First, they should be visual, focusing on graphics, illustrations and plots rather than text. If your slides contain large blocks of text--or even a few sentences in bullet points--your audience will spend their time reading instead of focusing on you and the points you want to draw attention to. Second, they should be aids--don't rely on the slides to make the presentation for you. Your speech should have more content than the slides. Don't pack slides too densely. If you put too much information up at once, the audience will lose focus. Have your bullet points have around ten words or less. This is a PowerPoint, not a PowerEssay. Don't use too many flashy graphics and animations. They distract attention from the information content of the slides--and they will distract attention away from you, the speaker, and what you are saying. Time your presentation to fit the information. If there is a time limit, be sure you stick to it including time for questions, if that is planned. It is better to pare down the material rather than to rush through it more quickly. Time your visuals to coincide with your speech. Avoid unnecessary or redundant slides such as outlines that describe the presentation to follow. If you have more material than you can fit in the time limit, push that material onto "extra" slides after the end of your presentation. Those slides might come in handy if, during Q&A, someone asks you for more detail. Then, you will look extra-well-prepared! Make sure the color schemes of slides are appropriate for the presentation venue. In some situations, dark text on a light background looks best, while sometimes light text on a dark background is easier to read. You might even prepare a version of your presentation in both formats just in case.
  • Don't memorizeRehearsing is one thing, committing the presentation to memory and performing it by heart, is not the way to go. You need to present, not to recite. But use your notes very sparingly.Too much time spent reading notes may convince your audience that you are unprepared. Dress for success.Some say you can never overdress for a presentation. Others will disagree. Our own belief is that other factors come in to play, particularly how you handle yourself in the situation. Humor and how formal your presentation is will impact whether you are "over" presented. But everyone agrees you should never underdress. How to determine what is appropriate? Worst case: Ask people. It's all part of doing it right. Pace yourself - don't go too fast, or too slow.A general rule, every "slide" deserves at least 10 seconds, and none rate more than 100. If you find yourself spending several minutes on one slide, consider breaking it up! (We're not suggesting this as a firm rule, but a good guideline. Obviously, some charts or graphics may take several minutes to properly present.) Then again, perhaps they could be better as multiple "slides." If you are done with a "slide" - lose it. Don't leave an image up for your audience once you move on to other points. KISS - Keep It Simple StupidThere are numerous ways to apply this ancient adage. The bottom line is that the more complicated you let things get, the more trouble you can expect: New technology is wonderful, but don't break in new equipment 15 minutes before the presentation starts.Keep your presentation focused on the message, don't get carried away with special effects and razzle-dazzle.Whatever you do, don't have rented equipment scheduled to arrive 10 minutes before you speak.Check out everything in advance. Then check it again.
  • FEED BACK-- Find out what they thought of you, what they learned, what they were hoping to learn but didn't, how you can improve your presentation, how to improve your communication skills.
  • Know your audience and understand its perspective. Whether your goal is persuasion, or simply to inform, you need to understand your audience, its level of expertise and how your message will resonate. Crafting a presentation for a group of high school interns would be very different compared to an executive report to management, pitching a sales idea, or addressing a hostile audience about why the company needs to cut benefits. 2Research thoroughly. You absolutely must be an expert on the subject. Okay, you don’t have to be the world’s leading authority, but you have to know the critical facts as well as much of the little-known information. Just talking about things everybody already knows is a recipe for boredom. It’s not at all unusual to spend weeks, or months, getting the facts, alternate opinions and comments from reputable sources as well as what the general community may think. 3Document your sources. Where you get your information is as important as the information itself. Without solid, peer-reviewed data, you’re just a person with an opinion. The audience, in this exercise, is expecting facts and projections. Your personal opinion may very well be important but it must not be the only thing you present. You won’t be listing the sources ad nauseum (you will bore them silly) but you do want to be able to give citations when asked. 4Write your speech. Off-the-cuff talks are fine if you’re on a soap box in a park. In a large room with hundreds of attendees, you just can’t afford that. You might not exactly "read" the speech, but that’s certainly not uncommon, especially if you’re going to be using a teleprompter. Print the speech in large print so you can easily see it at a glance without appearing to read from it. You want to give the appearance of talking to the audience instead of reading to them, but you also want the words and phrases to be precise and predetermined. 5Prepare the slide show. If you're going to use a slide show, the visuals you will show to the audience need to be designed to support what you’re saying. Avoid showing a slide that has an inordinate amount of detail – the visuals are for impact. A spreadsheet with dozens of rows and columns will be basically meaningless. Titles on the slide should reflect the content of the slide and support what you’re saying. Do not read the slide! Assume the audience can read. The visuals should support your words, not duplicate them. There are very few things you can do that will have a worse impact than reading what the audience can read on their own. If all you’re going to do is put up slides and repeat what’s on them, then they don’t need you. PowerPoint slides, overhead projectors, blackboards, and whiteboards are "visual aids" and should be treated as such. First, they should be visual, focusing on graphics, illustrations and plots rather than text. If your slides contain large blocks of text--or even a few sentences in bullet points--your audience will spend their time reading instead of focusing on you and the points you want to draw attention to. Second, they should be aids--don't rely on the slides to make the presentation for you. Your speech should have more content than the slides. Don't pack slides too densely. If you put too much information up at once, the audience will lose focus. Have your bullet points have around ten words or less. This is a PowerPoint, not a PowerEssay. Don't use too many flashy graphics and animations. They distract attention from the information content of the slides--and they will distract attention away from you, the speaker, and what you are saying. Time your presentation to fit the information. If there is a time limit, be sure you stick to it including time for questions, if that is planned. It is better to pare down the material rather than to rush through it more quickly. Time your visuals to coincide with your speech. Avoid unnecessary or redundant slides such as outlines that describe the presentation to follow. If you have more material than you can fit in the time limit, push that material onto "extra" slides after the end of your presentation. Those slides might come in handy if, during Q&A, someone asks you for more detail. Then, you will look extra-well-prepared! Make sure the color schemes of slides are appropriate for the presentation venue. In some situations, dark text on a light background looks best, while sometimes light text on a dark background is easier to read. You might even prepare a version of your presentation in both formats just in case.
  • Communication & the art of delivering presentation

    1. 1.
    2. 2. Communication & the Art of Delivering Presentation<br />Presented by:<br />Amaan Hussain<br />JasimSaud<br />Zain Taj<br />Saad Ahmed<br />
    3. 3. Wewilldiscuss….<br />Common Mistakes in Presentation<br />Communication<br />Communication Process<br />Presentation as communication<br />PrePresentation techniques<br />Effective skillsduringPresentation<br />Post Presentation Techniques<br />Conclusion<br />
    4. 4.
    5. 5.
    6. 6.
    7. 7. Some Common Mistakes in Presentation<br />
    8. 8. 1. People tend to put every word they are going to say on their PowerPoint slides. Although this eliminates the need to memorize your talk, ultimately this makes your slides crowded, wordy, and boring. You will lose your audience’s attention before you even reach the bottom of your …<br />
    9. 9. 1. Continued) … First slide.<br />
    10. 10. 2. Many people do not runspellcheekbefore the presentation – BIG MISTAKK!!! <br />Nothingmakesyoulokstupderthenspelingerors.<br />
    11. 11. 3. Too many bullet point levels.<br />
    12. 12. 4. Bad color schemes.<br />
    13. 13. Presentation as Communication<br />
    14. 14. Communicationis sending or receiving ideas , thoughts or feelings from one person to one or more persons in such a way that , the person receiving it understands in the same way as sender wants him/her to understand.<br />
    15. 15.
    16. 16. Pre-PresentationTechniques<br />Know your audience<br />Research thoroughly<br />Rehearse your speech<br />Plan, experience, control the environment<br />Document your sources<br />
    17. 17. Know your Audience<br />
    18. 18. Research Thoroughly<br />
    19. 19. Rehearse your speech<br />
    20. 20. Get used to the surroundings<br />
    21. 21. Effective SkillsDuringPresenation<br />Change this reaction<br /> to this reaction<br />
    22. 22. Effective SkillsDuringPresenation<br />The Rule of Tell'em<br />Don't memorize<br />Pace yourself - don't go too fast, or too slow<br />Sense of Humour Helps<br />Keep It Simple<br />Maintain Eye Contact<br />Tone of Voice<br />
    23. 23. The Rule of Tell ‘ Em<br />
    24. 24. Dont Memorize<br />
    25. 25. Pace Yourself !<br />
    26. 26. Sense of humor is important !<br />
    27. 27. Keep it Simple…<br />
    28. 28. Use your voice effectively.<br />
    29. 29. Maintain Eye Contact<br />
    30. 30. Post <br />Thank them! <br />Make materials available <br />Make yourself available <br />Provide them with a method of reaching you <br />Get feedback<br />Presentation<br />
    31. 31. Whatwelearned….<br /><ul><li>Be Prepared
    32. 32. Be Yourself
    33. 33. Think out of the Box
    34. 34. Be in Control
    35. 35. You know best !
    36. 36. Be Courteous.</li></li></ul><li>
    37. 37. Sources<br />http://www.wikihow.com/Deliver-Effective-Presentations<br />http://www.presentation-pointers.com/showarticle/articleid/64/<br />http://www.slideshare.net/eduardo.delafuente/the-art-of-presentation-following-the-zen-path-why<br />Images courtesy Google Images.<br />

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