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First lecture. Introduction to new media as a filed of study within a media industrial landscape.

First lecture. Introduction to new media as a filed of study within a media industrial landscape.

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  • This presentation explores this participatory culture in Youtube and Second Life

Lecture1 nm context Lecture1 nm context Presentation Transcript

  • NEW MEDIA CONTEXT(S) Mpm17 Lecture 1 Alexandra Bal
  • WHAT NEW MEDIA ?
    • New media is not a technology, it is a term that marks a specific moment in the life cycle of an ICT technology
  • TECHNOLOGY LIFE CYCLE
  • NEW MEDIA IS A FRAMEWORK
    • New media is a cultural and social innovation framework that is technology independent.
    • 100 years ago: Film was new media
    • 20 years ago: the internet and digital processes were new media
    • Today: media ecologies are new media
  • THE CURRENT MEDIA LANDSCAPE
  • NEW MEDIA CHARACTERISTICS
    • Communication and Information Technologies that mediate activities (work, personal)
    • Technologies that communicate
      • amongst themselves
      • with humans
      • facilitate human communication
    • In order to extend experiences through virtual, physical and hybrid spaces and alternate time continuum.
    • Some examples ….
  • SOCIAL ROBOTS
    • Nexi
    • Engineering
    • Computer Science
    • Media (audio)
    • HCI
    • Psychology
    • Performance
    • Acting
    • Narrative construction
  • EXAMPLES: ROBOTIC PROSTHETIC
    • An interdisciplinary approach to making
    • Robotic
    • Computer Science
    • HCI, Psychology
    • Sports medicine, Orthopedic
    • Ethics, neurology
    • Robotic
    • Computer Science
    • HCI
    • Psychology
    • biomedical engineering
    • neurology
  • SOCIABLE TECHNOLOGIES
    • Enhance or facilitate social integration for people with disabilities
  • THOUGHT CONTROL DEVICES
    • - Lighting Design
    • Experience Design
    • HCI
    • Computer Science
    • Set design
    • data visualization
  • ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE
    • Milo ad Eddy
    • Computer Science
    • HCI
    • AI
    • 3D modeling, animation
    • Gaming production
    • Simulation, Storytelling
    • - Behaviorial media
  • BIOMEDIA, NANOTECHNOLOGIES
  • IS NEW MEDIA THE SAME AS EMERGING MEDIA?
    • Emerging Media: Another practice that is encompassed within the overall field of New Media, emerging media refers to new emerging technologies and new emerging economic and industrial practices.
  • AUGMENTED REALITY
  • MIXED REALITY
  • VIRTUAL SIMULATION
  • DATA VISUALIZATION
  • CURRENT MASS MEDIA
    • Digital Media : industries that have adopted computational production processes such as film, television, multimedia and web.
      • Social Media: peer to peer technologies that individuals use to be active social participants in the creation of their culture.
  • EVOLUTION OF THINKING ON DIGITAL MEDIA
    • Digital Revolution (80s-90s): New media reshaping experience.
    • Horizontal Integration (mid-90’s): Media companies extend interests across many sectors of the entertainment industry.
    • Technological Convergence (late 90s): Industry mergers and dramatic technological developments create a network environments where primary media, is accessed from a single device.
    • Globalization (late 90s): Emergence of a "global media culture” from the cross-fertilization of national and international cultural traditions, generating new styles and genres of media.
    • Socio-Technological Hybridization (early 00s): Adept consumers/citizens integrate media through their own use through the ability to build their own hybrid social and cultural applications.
    • Media Ecologies (early10s): Ubiquitous computing means that intelligent devices facilitate machine and human networks.
  • PACES OF ADOPTION ARE ACCELERATING Source: http://techcrunch.com/2009/10/21/how-the-iphone-is-blowing-everyone-else-away-in-charts/
  • SOCIAL MEDIA = FOLK CULTURE
      • Folk Culture respond to the need of people to be active social participants in the creation of their culture (Bakan and Nolan, 2009)
      • To share To create (Janick, 2009)
      • To perform (McLuhan, 1967)
      • Their own stories, experiences and knowledge
      • The network is a public sphere
        • Creation and participation to public discourse and culture
  • MEDIA INDUSTRIES ARE CHANGING
    • Media Revolution
  • PARTICIPATORY CULTURE (JENKINS)
    • Peer based production and consumption of media
    • Facilitate users’ participation new tools and technologies enable consumers to archive, annotate, appropriate, and recirculate media content.
    • Mediate human relationships Do It Yourself (DYI) media allows Individuals and groups to participate to conversations.
    • The public has become a performer
    • Collective public performances are accepted
  • SOME FORMS OF INTELLIGENCE HAVE BECOME COLLECTIVE
      • Connective Intelligence ( de Kerckhove )
      • Collective Intelligence (Levy)
      • In both cases:
      • Culture and knowledge results from
        • Conversations between peers
        • Activities between peers
      • Knowledge is the result of
          • Lived experience = expertise
          • Authentic and personal narratives
          • Co-creation by peers
          • Peers interests’
  • NEW, EMERGING AND SOCIAL MEDIA ARE EXPERIENTIAL MEDIA
    • Media that are used not watched.
      • They facilitate and influence activities in real time.
      • They are personalized yet socially embedded.
      • They are networked and therefore facilitate telepresence .
      • They are localized media.
    • Transdisciplinary communities of practice.
      • Practices where social innovation comes from peers.
      • Practices focused on networked cultures.
    • Hybrid technological environments.
      • Ubiquitous interactive environments in which modes of production are developed around real-time simulation, visualization, telepresence and embodiment.
    • Active learning processes.
      • Experiential, practice based, iterative
      • Assessment of outcomes is part of the cycle.
    • Creators of experience goods/services.
      • Value comes from engagement within a process.
      • Holistic approach that focuses on facilitating human experiences. The aim is to build social mediated processes which may incorporate digital objects that enhance experiences.
  • DIGITAL MEDIA: AN OLD NEW MEDIA
  • EVOLUTION OF THINKING IN RELATIONSHIP TO DIGITAL MEDIA
    • The Digital Revolution (80’s and early 90’s) : New media are reshaping contemporary experience, positing issues about work, home, education, politics and community.
    • Horizontal Integration (mid 90’s): Contemporary media companies hold interest across many sectors of the entertainment industry, raising questions about intellectual property, competition, and monopolies. Technological Convergence (late 90’s): Industry mergers and dramatic technological developments create a network environment in which all primary media, from television to telephone, can be accessed via a single device, creating new forms of interaction across and among media. The push is to standardized the use of data.
  • EVOLUTION OF THINKING IN RELATIONSHIP TO DIGITAL MEDIA
    • Globalization (late 90’s): Advanced telecommunications and the worldwide expansion of media markets create an urgent need to understand our emerging "global media culture," the cross-fertilization of national and international cultural traditions, and the new styles and genres developing in this context.
    • Socio-Technological Hybridation (early 00s): We are increasingly adept as consumers and citizens at using one medium in relation to another, choosing which technology is best to receive or transmit a particular form of information, and transforming media content to better express our own ideas. Industries try to adapt to this demand by building modular, adaptable technologies. Giving users the ability to build their own hybrid machines (I.e. the visor). Only the point of connection between content and form can be standardized.
    • media ecologies (mid 00s): networks are connecting all type of information and communication systems. Ubiquitous computing, social computing and virtuality all blend within one system. Users no longer choose devices, intelligent device connect to each other for us. aggregation of content happens automatically. Machine and human networks coexist.
  • WHAT IS THE RELATION TO EDUCATION? A major societal shift is in process. Constant New Media Innovation has given rise to a Maker culture and social media to a peer to peer culture that are becoming cultural capital. New Blooms Taxonomy of learning signal that change:
  • Source: http://pkab.files.wordpress.com/2008/11/blooms_digital_taxonomy_wth_collab.jpg
  • NEW WAYS OF CREATING KNOWLEDGE
    • New media, Emerging, Social and Experiential media facilitate alternate educational models based on informal learning and experience:
    • Learner centered and active learning
    • Peer based social learning
    • Empowering learning
    • Creating learning environnements
    • Delocate learning