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Marmon Glenn
Marmon Glenn
Marmon Glenn
Marmon Glenn
Marmon Glenn
Marmon Glenn
Marmon Glenn
Marmon Glenn
Marmon Glenn
Marmon Glenn
Marmon Glenn
Marmon Glenn
Marmon Glenn
Marmon Glenn
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Marmon Glenn

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Transcript

  • 1. Glenn Marmon Connecticut College ’09 Janardhan Iyengar Visiting Associate Professor Connecticut College
  • 2. Application Layer Transport Layer Network Layer
  • 3.
    • TCP:
      • Is reliable
      • Is connection-based
      • Provides a strictly ordered byte stream
      • Supports secure communication with TLS (SSL).
    • UDP:
      • Is unreliable
      • Is connectionless
      • Provides unordered datagrams
  • 4.
    • Created to adapt SS7 telephony signaling mechanisms to IP.
    • Needed an appropriate transport protocol:
      • Flow and congestion control.
      • Error detection and correction.
      • In-sequence message delivery within one control stream.
      • Resistance to network failure.
    • TCP and UDP were deemed insufficient.
  • 5.
    • Reliable and congestion-controlled.
    • Preserves message boundaries.
    • One-to-many style sockets.
    • Multiple ordered control streams within one association.
    • Can bind to multiple interfaces of an endpoint within one association.
  • 6.
    • How do SIGTRAN’s considerations translate to SIP?
    • Theoretical work: RFC 4168
    • To date, few actual implementations and little practical research.
    • How does a SIP over SCTP implementation compare to SIP over other reliable protocols?
  • 7.
    • SCTP associations automatically span all available interfaces at both endpoints.
    • Very manageable code (syntactically similar to UDP code).
    • Improved process-to-socket interaction compared to TCP.
  • 8. Processes Associations
  • 9. Processes Connected TCP Sockets Connections
  • 10.
    • Use multiple streams to categorize SIP messages.
    • Tie categories/streams to specific processes.
    • Specialize processes for the category of messages they process.
  • 11. Processes SIP Messages (Stream 1) SIP Messages (Stream 0) Associations
  • 12.
    • Open-source allows for free modification
    • Active, feature-friendly development
    • Helpful development team
    • Wealth of online documentation
    • Active mailing list community
    • Code separated into relevant, understandable chunks.
  • 13.  
  • 14.
    • IETF RFC 4960: Stream Control Transmission Protocol
    • IETF TSVWG Internet Draft: SCTP Sockets API (rev. 15)
    • IETF RFC 4168: SCTP as a transport for SIP
    • Iván Arias Rodríguez, “Stream Control Transmission Protocol: The design of a new reliable transport protocol for IP networks”
    • Thomas Pang, “Stream Control Transmission Protocol (SCTP) for Session Initiation Protocol (SIP)”

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