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China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
China final power point edits
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China final power point edits

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  • Radio Channel 3 – Languages in English: News, popular music, information, romance, comedy, reality, sports and education programs. *Mention other radio channels and what they have.
  • Most programming time is similar to the U.S.’s. They run in half hour – one hour increments.
  • Mention feud between China and Google. Social network users are mainly students.
  • Transcript

    1. 1 CHINA Created by: Chynna Greene, Kristina Guerrero, Alaina Leadbeter, Alvin Loi, Hayley Sparre, Mitch Weiss
    2. 2 Chinese Culture: GeographyGEOGRAPHYGEOGRAPHY
    3. 3 Geographic CharacteristicsGeographic Characteristics  China is the 4China is the 4thth largest country in the world with 9,596,961 sq.largest country in the world with 9,596,961 sq. km.km.  Natural Resources include coal, iron ore, petroleum, natural gas,Natural Resources include coal, iron ore, petroleum, natural gas, mercury, tin, tungsten, antimony, manganese, molybdenum andmercury, tin, tungsten, antimony, manganese, molybdenum and rare earth elements.rare earth elements.  The climate is very diverse! It’s tropical in the south andThe climate is very diverse! It’s tropical in the south and subarctic in the north.subarctic in the north. GEOGRAPHYGEOGRAPHY
    4. 4 Important Cities  Capital City: BeijingCapital City: Beijing  Key Cities:Key Cities:  Shanghai: It is China’s most modern andShanghai: It is China’s most modern and populated city and it’s busiest port.populated city and it’s busiest port.  Hong Kong: The British occupied Hong Kong inHong Kong: The British occupied Hong Kong in 1841 for 100 years during the first Opium War.1841 for 100 years during the first Opium War. They gave Hong Kong back to China in JulyThey gave Hong Kong back to China in July 1997. The official language there is Cantonese.1997. The official language there is Cantonese. GEOGRAPHYGEOGRAPHY
    5. 5 Colonial HistoryColonial History  China is the world’s oldest civilization, spanning overChina is the world’s oldest civilization, spanning over some 5,000 years!some 5,000 years!  It was ruled by dynasties. The 1It was ruled by dynasties. The 1stst dynasty was the Xiadynasty was the Xia dynasty, established around 2000 B.C.dynasty, established around 2000 B.C.  Qui Shi Huang became known as the first emperor ofQui Shi Huang became known as the first emperor of China.China.  Some of the Chinese dynasties were formed by nativeSome of the Chinese dynasties were formed by native Han and nomadic northern tribes who were absorbedHan and nomadic northern tribes who were absorbed into Chinese culture.into Chinese culture. HISTORYHISTORY
    6. 6 Colonial History  Under the Qin Shi Huang in the 3Under the Qin Shi Huang in the 3rdrd century B.C.,century B.C., construction of the Great Wall of China began asconstruction of the Great Wall of China began as protection against invasions from their northern andprotection against invasions from their northern and eastern neighbors.eastern neighbors.  It was finished under the Ming Dynasty in the 17It was finished under the Ming Dynasty in the 17thth century A.D.century A.D. HISTORYHISTORY
    7. 7 Colonial HistoryColonial History  The Opium WarsThe Opium Wars  The First War: 1839-1842The First War: 1839-1842  Between China and BritainBetween China and Britain  China lost and forced to give Hong Kong to the UK.China lost and forced to give Hong Kong to the UK.  The Second War: 1856-1860The Second War: 1856-1860  The war was between China, Russia, the U.S, France and Britain.The war was between China, Russia, the U.S, France and Britain. China lost.China lost. HISTORYHISTORY
    8. 8 LanguageLanguage
    9. 9  National Language: MandarinNational Language: Mandarin  The language is spoken by possibly more people thanThe language is spoken by possibly more people than any other language. Over 1.3 billion people speak it!any other language. Over 1.3 billion people speak it!  It’s based of the the Beijing dialect.It’s based of the the Beijing dialect.  Standard Mandarin is considered one of the 6 official UNStandard Mandarin is considered one of the 6 official UN languages.languages. LANGUAGELANGUAGE
    10. 10 History of the LanguageHistory of the Language  The Silk Road had a major influence on the language’s phoneticThe Silk Road had a major influence on the language’s phonetic development with a lot of Mediterranean and Buddhist scripture influences.development with a lot of Mediterranean and Buddhist scripture influences.  Western languages began influencing Chinese language in the 20Western languages began influencing Chinese language in the 20thth century.century.  Some Japanese words are indistinguishable in comparison to traditionalSome Japanese words are indistinguishable in comparison to traditional Chinese. Some even argue the origins of certain words between the twoChinese. Some even argue the origins of certain words between the two countries.countries.  Malcom Moore, writer for The Telegraph, said the Chinese is absorbingMalcom Moore, writer for The Telegraph, said the Chinese is absorbing English words like: okay, bye-bye and guitar!English words like: okay, bye-bye and guitar! LANGUAGELANGUAGE
    11. 11 Secondary LanguagesSecondary Languages  1. Wu: (6.7%) Spoken in Zhejiang and Jiang Su provinces in1. Wu: (6.7%) Spoken in Zhejiang and Jiang Su provinces in Shanghai and Hong Kong.Shanghai and Hong Kong.  2. Yue/Cantonese: (5.2%) Spoken in Guangdong and Guangxi2. Yue/Cantonese: (5.2%) Spoken in Guangdong and Guangxi provinces and Hainan island. Also spoken in Hong Kong, Macau,provinces and Hainan island. Also spoken in Hong Kong, Macau, Singapore and Malaysia.Singapore and Malaysia.  English: Since the 1970’s, teaching English has helped China withEnglish: Since the 1970’s, teaching English has helped China with modernization and has given people more socioeconomicmodernization and has given people more socioeconomic opportunities.opportunities. LANGUAGELANGUAGE
    12. 12 Language InfluencesLanguage Influences  Mandarin is taught in schools around the world.Mandarin is taught in schools around the world.  In 2005, over 100,000 foreign learners took the Chinese ProficiencyIn 2005, over 100,000 foreign learners took the Chinese Proficiency Test!Test!  Chinese is considered one of the most important languages in theChinese is considered one of the most important languages in the world because…world because…  …… of the number of speakers.of the number of speakers.  …… of the documented history.of the documented history.  …… of China’s cultural influence.of China’s cultural influence. PHILOSOPHPHILOSOPH YY
    13. 13 SocietySociety
    14. 14 National PopulationNational Population  China’s Population:China’s Population: 1,343,239,923 people SOCIETYSOCIETY
    15. 15 Regional PopulationsRegional Populations  Beijing: 12.214 millionBeijing: 12.214 million  Shanghai: 16.575 millionShanghai: 16.575 million  Guangzhou: 8.884 millionGuangzhou: 8.884 million  Shenzhen: 9.005 millionShenzhen: 9.005 million  Chongqing: 9.401 millionChongqing: 9.401 million SOCIETYSOCIETY
    16. 16 Economic/Class StructureEconomic/Class Structure  Gross Domestic Product (GDP)Gross Domestic Product (GDP)  $12.38 trillion$12.38 trillion  33rdrd in the world behind the Europe andin the world behind the Europe and the U.S.the U.S.  GDP- Per Capita (PPP)GDP- Per Capita (PPP)  $9,100 (118$9,100 (118thth in the world)in the world)  Population below the poverty line: 9.2%Population below the poverty line: 9.2% SOCIETYSOCIETY
    17. 17 LiteracyLiteracy  Literacy is defined as age 15 and over that can read and write.Literacy is defined as age 15 and over that can read and write.  TOTAL POPULATIONTOTAL POPULATION  92.2%92.2%  Male: 96%Male: 96% Female 88.5%Female 88.5% SOCIETYSOCIETY
    18. 18 Race/Ethnic StrataRace/Ethnic Strata  Main Ethnic Group: HanMain Ethnic Group: Han Chinese (91.5%)Chinese (91.5%)  Other Groups:Other Groups:  ZhuangZhuang HuiHui ManchuManchu DongDong  TibetanTibetan BuyiBuyi MongolMongol KoreanKorean  YiYi YaoYao MiaoMiao TujiaTujia SOCIETYSOCIETY
    19. 19 ReligionReligion  Mainly AtheistMainly Atheist  Other religions include: Taoist, Buddhist, ChristianOther religions include: Taoist, Buddhist, Christian and Muslimand Muslim  31% of the Chinese consider religion somewhat or very31% of the Chinese consider religion somewhat or very important.important.  11% say religion is not important at all.11% say religion is not important at all.  Taoism is the only religion originated in China.Taoism is the only religion originated in China.  Founded by Lao ZiFounded by Lao Zi  The Yin and Yang philosophyThe Yin and Yang philosophy SOCIETYSOCIETY
    20. 20 Everyday Life and ValuesEveryday Life and Values  The Chinese are known for their hospitality andThe Chinese are known for their hospitality and reserve.reserve.  They follow Confucianism which focuses on order inThey follow Confucianism which focuses on order in every way of life.every way of life.  The principle of of Guanxi: “All for one and one forThe principle of of Guanxi: “All for one and one for all.”all.”  They are very proud of their history and achievements.They are very proud of their history and achievements. SOCIETYSOCIETY
    21. 21 Everyday Life and ValuesEveryday Life and Values  The central government emphasizes respect and obedienceThe central government emphasizes respect and obedience to authority.to authority.  They have high values on social respect of elders andThey have high values on social respect of elders and counterparts.counterparts.  Family is most important.Family is most important.  It is considered more important than the individual, and theIt is considered more important than the individual, and the eldest is consulted for the biggest decisions.eldest is consulted for the biggest decisions.  Children receive a lot of attention because of China’s One ChildChildren receive a lot of attention because of China’s One Child Policy.Policy.  Women are powerful as a worker and housewife.Women are powerful as a worker and housewife. SOCIETYSOCIETY
    22. 22 Everyday Life and ValuesEveryday Life and Values  Relationships and MarriageRelationships and Marriage  Intimate displays of affection are discouraged in the country, butIntimate displays of affection are discouraged in the country, but more common in the city.more common in the city.  The minimum age for marriage is 22 for men and 20 for women.The minimum age for marriage is 22 for men and 20 for women.  If couples marry before that, they don’t get benefits.If couples marry before that, they don’t get benefits.  Brides wear red to symbolize happiness and good luck.Brides wear red to symbolize happiness and good luck. SOCIETYSOCIETY
    23. 23 Everyday Life and ValuesEveryday Life and Values  Many Chinese enjoy shopping overseas because brand names areMany Chinese enjoy shopping overseas because brand names are cheaper.cheaper.  Favorite sports include soccer, table tennis, swimming andFavorite sports include soccer, table tennis, swimming and badminton.badminton.  On Chinese New Year Eve, families have large dinners andOn Chinese New Year Eve, families have large dinners and children receive red envelopes with money. Children born withchildren receive red envelopes with money. Children born with the same animal the year celebrates gets a red gift to give themthe same animal the year celebrates gets a red gift to give them good luck!good luck! SOCIETYSOCIETY
    24. 24 Government
    25. 25 Communist Party of ChinaCommunist Party of China  President: Xi JinpingPresident: Xi Jinping  Premier: Li KeqiangPremier: Li Keqiang GOVERNMENGOVERNMEN TT
    26. 26 Communist Party of ChinaCommunist Party of China  The Communist Party of China includes a leading central committee.The Communist Party of China includes a leading central committee.  Members of the central committee are elected by the standing committeeMembers of the central committee are elected by the standing committee and is organized based on the principle of democratic centralism.and is organized based on the principle of democratic centralism.  Head of State includes: The President who appoints the Premier.Head of State includes: The President who appoints the Premier.  Under that is the Vice President, the State Counselors and Ministers and theUnder that is the Vice President, the State Counselors and Ministers and the Secretary of State Counselors.Secretary of State Counselors. GOVERNMENGOVERNMEN TT
    27. 27 State AdministrationState Administration  The Central AdministrationThe Central Administration  They adopt and propose administrative measures.They adopt and propose administrative measures.  They stipulate tasks of commissions and administrations.They stipulate tasks of commissions and administrations.  They draw up and implement economic and social plans (budget plans,They draw up and implement economic and social plans (budget plans, civil affairs, public security and judicial administrations).civil affairs, public security and judicial administrations).  They handle foreign affairs and national defense.They handle foreign affairs and national defense.  The Local AdministrationThe Local Administration  They tend the provinces, cities, counties and townships.They tend the provinces, cities, counties and townships. GOVERNMENGOVERNMEN TT
    28. 28 China: Regulation and FinanceChina: Regulation and Finance Alvin LoiAlvin Loi Mitchell WeissMitchell Weiss Alaina LeadbetterAlaina Leadbetter Hayley SparreHayley Sparre Kristina GuerreroKristina Guerrero Chynna GreeneChynna Greene
    29. 29 Xi JinpingXi Jinping
    30. 30 PHILOSOPHYPHILOSOPHY
    31. 31 Communist Media System:Communist Media System:  EgalitarianismEgalitarianism  No class structureNo class structure  Society needs are greater than the individualSociety needs are greater than the individual  Government owned media structureGovernment owned media structure  No profitable motivesNo profitable motives PHILOSOPHPHILOSOPH YY
    32. 32 Communist Media System:Communist Media System:  Reinforcing Government ViewsReinforcing Government Views  ArtsArts  High cultureHigh culture  Support of Communist DoctrineSupport of Communist Doctrine  Government CensorshipGovernment Censorship  No Deviation or ViolationNo Deviation or Violation  TerminationTermination  ImprisonmentImprisonment PHILOSOPHPHILOSOPH YY
    33. 33 XinhuaXinhua • State News AgencyState News Agency • Considered to be a propaganda toolConsidered to be a propaganda tool by press freedom organizationsby press freedom organizations • Under that is the CentralUnder that is the Central Propaganda Department (CPD).Propaganda Department (CPD). Under that is GeneralUnder that is General Administration of Press andAdministration of Press and Publication (GAPP) and StatePublication (GAPP) and State Administration of Radio, Film andAdministration of Radio, Film and Television (SARFT)Television (SARFT) • The media companies under theseThe media companies under these departments are China Central TVdepartments are China Central TV and People's Daily.and People's Daily. PHILOSOPHPHILOSOPH YY
    34. 34 LET’S HAVE TEALET’S HAVE TEAPHILOSOPHPHILOSOPH YY
    35. 35 RegulationRegulation
    36. 36 Article 35Article 35  Freedom of speech and press by the Chinese ConstitutionFreedom of speech and press by the Chinese Constitution  Strict language requires Chinese citizens must defend:Strict language requires Chinese citizens must defend:  ““the security, honor, and interests of the motherland”the security, honor, and interests of the motherland”  Vague media regulationsVague media regulations  Anything disliked by government can be found harmful to the “motherland”Anything disliked by government can be found harmful to the “motherland” RegulationRegulation
    37. 37 Chain of CommandChain of Command  Chinese Communist PartyChinese Communist Party  Central Propaganda Department(CPD)Central Propaganda Department(CPD)  General Administration of Press and Publication (GAPP)General Administration of Press and Publication (GAPP)  State Administration of Radio, Film, and Television (SARFT)State Administration of Radio, Film, and Television (SARFT)  Media Companies:Media Companies:  Xinhua (government controlled television)Xinhua (government controlled television)  China Central TVChina Central TV  People’s DailyPeople’s Daily RegulationRegulation
    38. 38 Regulation Command BreakupRegulation Command Breakup  Central Propaganda Department (CPD)Central Propaganda Department (CPD)  Led by Lui YunshanLed by Lui Yunshan  Communist counterpart to the government GAPP and SARFTCommunist counterpart to the government GAPP and SARFT  They ensure that nothing is published that is inconsistent with the CommunistThey ensure that nothing is published that is inconsistent with the Communist Party views.Party views.  CPD deal with more monitoring the people while GAPP and SARFT exercise theirCPD deal with more monitoring the people while GAPP and SARFT exercise their censorship power through licensing.censorship power through licensing.  State Supreme Council(aka Central People’s Government)State Supreme Council(aka Central People’s Government)  They are the executive body of the highest organ of state power and the highestThey are the executive body of the highest organ of state power and the highest organ of state powerorgan of state power  They report directly to the National People Congress.They report directly to the National People Congress.  Work in tandem with GAPP and SARFTWork in tandem with GAPP and SARFT  The heads of these organization are all party members.The heads of these organization are all party members.  The members of the organizations are all appointed by their respective leadersThe members of the organizations are all appointed by their respective leaders after proving their loyalty views of the Communist party.after proving their loyalty views of the Communist party. RegulationRegulation http://www.cecc.gov/pages/virtualAcad/exp/expcensors.php, http://al.china-embassy.org/eng/zggk/t514664.htm
    39. 39 Who Regulates What?Who Regulates What? SARFTSARFT  State administration of radio,State administration of radio, film, and televisionfilm, and television  Screen, bans, and shuts downScreen, bans, and shuts down unapproved materialunapproved material  Led by Cai FuchaoLed by Cai Fuchao GAPPGAPP  General Administration of PressGeneral Administration of Press and Publicationand Publication  Regulates newspapers and InternetRegulates newspapers and Internet  Licenses publishersLicenses publishers  Screen written publicationsScreen written publications  Bans and shuts down unapprovedBans and shuts down unapproved materialmaterial  Led by Zhang FuhaiLed by Zhang Fuhai RegulationRegulation As result of their similar responsibilities,As result of their similar responsibilities, the two organizations will merge in 2013 under the new government regime.the two organizations will merge in 2013 under the new government regime. Those who are leaders in these sections of government are appointed by the president.Those who are leaders in these sections of government are appointed by the president.
    40. 40 China Media Control MethodsChina Media Control Methods  Dismissals and demotionDismissals and demotion  LibelLibel  FinesFines  Closing news outletClosing news outlet RegulationRegulation
    41. 41 Content Regulated In ChinaContent Regulated In China  Information deemed as state secretsInformation deemed as state secrets  Intentionally defined vaguely and could cover any information deemed a dangerIntentionally defined vaguely and could cover any information deemed a danger to the countryto the country  Social media websiteSocial media website  Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube are blockedFacebook, Twitter, and YouTube are blocked  However, they do have state friendly equivalent of these sitesHowever, they do have state friendly equivalent of these sites  Limited international media, such as CNN, are allowed, but are closelyLimited international media, such as CNN, are allowed, but are closely monitored by the government.monitored by the government. RegulationRegulation
    42. 42 Content Regulated ContinuedContent Regulated Continued  They regulate all posts that fall under the category ofThey regulate all posts that fall under the category of pornography and criticism of censorshippornography and criticism of censorship  Any material that suggest change in governmental policies orAny material that suggest change in governmental policies or ideologyideology  Criticizing and even making fun of the government is allowed asCriticizing and even making fun of the government is allowed as long as they don’t suggest an actual policy changelong as they don’t suggest an actual policy change RegulationRegulation
    43. 43 Chinese CensorshipChinese Censorship  Keeping foreign sites out is easy for China since access is limitedKeeping foreign sites out is easy for China since access is limited  Three large computer centers in Beijing, Shanghai, and Guangzhou areThree large computer centers in Beijing, Shanghai, and Guangzhou are the only access pointthe only access point  Government computers nicknamed the “Great Firewall” keep a watchfulGovernment computers nicknamed the “Great Firewall” keep a watchful eye on the dataeye on the data  Any suspicious data is intercepted and checked against the ever changingAny suspicious data is intercepted and checked against the ever changing list of forbidden keywords and websiteslist of forbidden keywords and websites RegulationRegulation
    44. 44 Chinese Censorship ContinuedChinese Censorship Continued  In 2010, the government issued the first “white paper” on theIn 2010, the government issued the first “white paper” on the Internet that requires all Internet users to abide by theirInternet that requires all Internet users to abide by their “Internet sovereignty” and follow their rules and regulations“Internet sovereignty” and follow their rules and regulations  The watch group Reporter Without Borders ranked China 174The watch group Reporter Without Borders ranked China 174 out of 179 in its worldwide index of press freedom in 2012out of 179 in its worldwide index of press freedom in 2012 RegulationRegulation
    45. 45 Censorship guidelinesCensorship guidelines  In 2010, the New York Times published a story involving a leakedIn 2010, the New York Times published a story involving a leaked  March 2010 report of China’s secretive censorship guidelinesMarch 2010 report of China’s secretive censorship guidelines  For news on the electoral law during the two meeting (annual session of theFor news on the electoral law during the two meeting (annual session of the National People’s Congress and the Chinese People’s Political ConsultativeNational People’s Congress and the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference), use only articles from Xinhua News Agency and People’s DailyConference), use only articles from Xinhua News Agency and People’s Daily  Do not feature news article on the diary of a bureau director. News must not carryDo not feature news article on the diary of a bureau director. News must not carry photos of related figures or content relating to individuals’ private matters fromphotos of related figures or content relating to individuals’ private matters from human flesh searches and the likehuman flesh searches and the like  No negative news allowed on the front page of newspapers or the headline newsNo negative news allowed on the front page of newspapers or the headline news section of websitessection of websites  Do not report on the cases of detention center inmates dying during sleepDo not report on the cases of detention center inmates dying during sleep RegulationRegulation
    46. 46 Government Control is Calming DownGovernment Control is Calming Down  With the uprising of advertising and their funding of mediaWith the uprising of advertising and their funding of media outlets, government control is starting to slip. New regulationsoutlets, government control is starting to slip. New regulations have yet to be put in place to counter this advertising overhaul,have yet to be put in place to counter this advertising overhaul, resulting in more liberal, though not very liberal,resulting in more liberal, though not very liberal, pieces/advertisements to make their way into the mass media.pieces/advertisements to make their way into the mass media. RegulationRegulation
    47. 47 FINANCFINANC EE
    48. 48 ADVERTISINGADVERTISING  Government is losingGovernment is losing stranglehold on regulating mediastranglehold on regulating media outlets because of alternativeoutlets because of alternative funding sourcesfunding sources  Growing at a rate of 28%Growing at a rate of 28% annually as a source of fundingannually as a source of funding FUNDINGFUNDING  Current split:Current split:  Government: 50%Government: 50%  Private: 16%Private: 16%  The wealthier with aThe wealthier with a political agenda invest.political agenda invest.  Advertising: 34%Advertising: 34% FINANCEFINANCE
    49. 49 Losing Financial ControlLosing Financial Control  Government funding leads to dictatorship of the news which isGovernment funding leads to dictatorship of the news which is broadcast.broadcast.  Advertisements are becoming popular.Advertisements are becoming popular.  Government influence is becoming weaker financially.Government influence is becoming weaker financially. FINANCEFINANCE
    50. 50 In an attempt to regainIn an attempt to regain some control of thesome control of the printed news, theprinted news, the Chinese governmentChinese government attempted to controlattempted to control and limit theand limit the information found oninformation found on Google.Google. Google ultimatelyGoogle ultimately pulled out of China.pulled out of China. FINANCEFINANCE
    51. 51 RADIO, FILM &RADIO, FILM & TVTV  CNY: Chinese National YuanCNY: Chinese National Yuan  2011 accounted for $290 billion CNY2011 accounted for $290 billion CNY  $46.68 billion US$46.68 billion US  Average growth:Average growth:  $50 billion CNY/ year$50 billion CNY/ year  $$8.05 billion US8.05 billion US  Advertising:Advertising:  $215 billion CNY$215 billion CNY FINANCEFINANCE Information Courtesy of SARFT: State Administration of Radio Film and TVInformation Courtesy of SARFT: State Administration of Radio Film and TV
    52. 52 InternetInternet  Revenue stream:Revenue stream:  $42.9 billion CNY$42.9 billion CNY  $ 6.9 billion US$ 6.9 billion US  Online Advertising:Online Advertising:  $14.87 billion CNY$14.87 billion CNY  $2.4 billion US$2.4 billion US FINANCEFINANCE Information Courtesy of SARFT: State Administration of Radio Film and TVInformation Courtesy of SARFT: State Administration of Radio Film and TV
    53. 53 NEWSPAPERNEWSPAPER Revenue stream:Revenue stream:  $37.8 million CNY$37.8 million CNY  $6.08 million US$6.08 million US Due to strict government restriction on media platforms, newspapers are controlled the most andDue to strict government restriction on media platforms, newspapers are controlled the most and therefore have the least amount of financial data available, but the primary form of funding fortherefore have the least amount of financial data available, but the primary form of funding for these newspapers comes from advertising.these newspapers comes from advertising. FINANCEFINANCE Information Courtesy of SARFT: State Administration of Radio Film and TVInformation Courtesy of SARFT: State Administration of Radio Film and TV
    54. 54 Chinese government is in a state ofChinese government is in a state of “schizophrenia”“schizophrenia” about media policy as itabout media policy as it “goes back and forth, testing the line,“goes back and forth, testing the line, knowing they need press freedom—andknowing they need press freedom—and the information it provides—but worriedthe information it provides—but worried about opening the door to the type ofabout opening the door to the type of freedoms that could lead to the regime’sfreedoms that could lead to the regime’s downfall.”downfall.”  Elizabeth C. EconomyElizabeth C. Economy  China Domestic and Foreign Policy Senior Fellow and Director of Asia StudiesChina Domestic and Foreign Policy Senior Fellow and Director of Asia Studies
    55. 55 CHINESE MEDIA ACCESSIBILITY, CONTENT, NEWS
    56. 56 Media Accessibility in China
    57. 57 China Newspapers AccessibilityChina Newspapers Accessibility  Combined circulation: 76.84 papers for every 1,000 Chinese. 70.6Combined circulation: 76.84 papers for every 1,000 Chinese. 70.6 million daily copies.million daily copies.  Top 10 daily newspapersTop 10 daily newspapers Printed DailyPrinted Daily TypeType  1. Reference News1. Reference News (3,250,000)(3,250,000) GeneralGeneral  2. People’s Daily2. People’s Daily (2,520,000)(2,520,000) GeneralGeneral  3. Guagzhou Daily3. Guagzhou Daily (1,850,000)(1,850,000) GeneralGeneral  4. Yangtse Evening News4. Yangtse Evening News (1,740,000)(1,740,000) GeneralGeneral  5. Qilu Evening News5. Qilu Evening News (1,670,000)(1,670,000) GeneralGeneral  6. Information Times6. Information Times (1,570,000)(1,570,000) TabloidTabloid ACCESSIBILITACCESSIBILIT YY
    58. 58 Sample NewspapersACCESSIBILITACCESSIBILIT YY
    59. 59 China Radio Accessibility - PublicChina Radio Accessibility - Public  In 2011 97.06% of China’s population had access to radio.In 2011 97.06% of China’s population had access to radio.  There are 673 radio stations.There are 673 radio stations.  As of 2011, there are 2,590 radio shows.As of 2011, there are 2,590 radio shows.  AM 369, FM 259, shortwave 45AM 369, FM 259, shortwave 45  414 million radio receivers414 million radio receivers  325.2 radios per 1,000 people325.2 radios per 1,000 people  State Administration of Radio Film and Television (S.A.R.F.T)State Administration of Radio Film and Television (S.A.R.F.T)  Originally founded in 1986, and reorganized in 1998.Originally founded in 1986, and reorganized in 1998.  Formats include: news and information, “teen,” finance, comedy,Formats include: news and information, “teen,” finance, comedy, hit music, international news coverage, current affairs,hit music, international news coverage, current affairs, entertainment, music, health, cosmetic trends, jokes and conductsentertainment, music, health, cosmetic trends, jokes and conducts interviews with celebrities.interviews with celebrities. ACCESSIBILITACCESSIBILIT YY
    60. 60 Examples of China Radio StationsExamples of China Radio Stations  PublicPublic broadcasting includes radio, televisionbroadcasting includes radio, television and other electronic mediaand other electronic media outlets whose primary mission is public service. Public broadcastersoutlets whose primary mission is public service. Public broadcasters receive funding from diverse sources including license fees, individualreceive funding from diverse sources including license fees, individual contributions, public financing and commercial financing.contributions, public financing and commercial financing.  AA Private StationPrivate Station a radio transmitting station carrying on a messagea radio transmitting station carrying on a message service for business purposes but not open to the public.service for business purposes but not open to the public.  CommercialCommercial means involving or relating to the buying and selling ofmeans involving or relating to the buying and selling of goods.goods. ACCESSIBILITACCESSIBILIT YY
    61. 61 China Radio Stations …China Radio Stations …  *All METRO stations are private.*All METRO stations are private.  Metro finance (FM 104)Metro finance (FM 104)  Metro Finance started up on 5 February 2001. Metro FinanceMetro Finance started up on 5 February 2001. Metro Finance delivers diverse content relating to investment funds, securities,delivers diverse content relating to investment funds, securities, bonds, insurancebonds, insurance and other information relating to financialand other information relating to financial markets in many places around the world.markets in many places around the world.  Metro Info (FM 99.7)Metro Info (FM 99.7)  Metro Showbiz has started broadcasting the latest entertainmentMetro Showbiz has started broadcasting the latest entertainment news hourly, 24 hours a day since 22 January 2001.news hourly, 24 hours a day since 22 January 2001. ACCESSIBILITACCESSIBILIT YY
    62. 62 China Radio Stations …China Radio Stations …  Public Radio StationsPublic Radio Stations  Central People’s Broadcasting Station (CPBS)Central People’s Broadcasting Station (CPBS)  China’s main radio station.China’s main radio station.  CPBS was founded in 1949 and owned by SARFT.CPBS was founded in 1949 and owned by SARFT.  SARFT is a government organization which indicated governmentSARFT is a government organization which indicated government funding for CPBS.funding for CPBS.  National Radio Station of the People’s Republic of China has 39National Radio Station of the People’s Republic of China has 39 stations and broadcasts in 40 countries.stations and broadcasts in 40 countries. ACCESSIBILITACCESSIBILIT YY
    63. 63 National RadioNational Radio  CNR has ten channels, with 198 hours of dailyCNR has ten channels, with 198 hours of daily broadcasting through satellite.broadcasting through satellite.  China Radio International is broadcast worldwide. FirstChina Radio International is broadcast worldwide. First aired December 3, 1941. China was in civil war.aired December 3, 1941. China was in civil war. ACCESSIBILITACCESSIBILIT YY
    64. 64 China Television AccessibilityChina Television Accessibility  Receivers per capita: 400 million television receivers perReceivers per capita: 400 million television receivers per 1billion people.1billion people.  3,240 Television Broadcast Stations3,240 Television Broadcast Stations  209 are operated by China Central Television, 31 are provincial209 are operated by China Central Television, 31 are provincial television stations, 3,000 are local city.television stations, 3,000 are local city.  On average there is 1 television per 1.5 households.On average there is 1 television per 1.5 households.  Cable penetration: 187 subscribersCable penetration: 187 subscribers  Worlds largest cable user base.Worlds largest cable user base.  Coverage of T.V. network has reached 98%Coverage of T.V. network has reached 98%  Digital signal reached 45%.Digital signal reached 45%.  30 provincial satellite networks in China.30 provincial satellite networks in China.  This is for areas without access to cable.This is for areas without access to cable. ACCESSIBILITACCESSIBILIT YY
    65. 65 China Television …China Television …  Private TelevisionPrivate Television  Systems are audio and visual media distribution systems that haveSystems are audio and visual media distribution systems that have been designed or setup to be used in private facilities such as hotels,been designed or setup to be used in private facilities such as hotels, cruise ships or college campuses.cruise ships or college campuses.  All of the entertainment channels are privately funded.All of the entertainment channels are privately funded.  News channels, which would fall under China Central TelevisionNews channels, which would fall under China Central Television (CCTV), is considered public because it’s ultimately funded by the(CCTV), is considered public because it’s ultimately funded by the government and airs propaganda related material and pro-government and airs propaganda related material and pro- communist party of China material.communist party of China material. ACCESSIBILITACCESSIBILIT YY
    66. 66 China Television …China Television …  Top 12 Channels in China:Top 12 Channels in China:  ChannelChannel RatingRating GenreGenre  1. CCTV 11. CCTV 1 0.660.66 GeneralGeneral  2. CCTV 62. CCTV 6 0.430.43 MoviesMovies  3. CCTV 83. CCTV 8 0.370.37 TVTV SeriesSeries  4. CCTV 34. CCTV 3 0.340.34 Arts &Arts & EntertainmentEntertainment  5. Hunan Satellite TV5. Hunan Satellite TV 0.320.32 GeneralGeneral  6. CCTV 56. CCTV 5 0.290.29 SportsSports  7. Jiangsu Satellite TV7. Jiangsu Satellite TV 0.280.28 EntertainmentEntertainment  8. Zhejiang Satellite TV8. Zhejiang Satellite TV 0.270.27 EntertainmentEntertainment  9. CCTV 139. CCTV 13 0.260.26 NewsNews  10. CCTV 410. CCTV 4 0.230.23 International Chinese NewsInternational Chinese News ACCESSIBILITACCESSIBILIT YY
    67. 67 Array of China TelevisionArray of China TelevisionACCESSIBILITACCESSIBILIT YY
    68. 68 China Internet AccessibilityChina Internet Accessibility  Internet users: 538,000,000Internet users: 538,000,000  Penetration: 40.1%.Penetration: 40.1%.  Facebook users: 633,300.Facebook users: 633,300.  60,000 Internet cafes available in China.60,000 Internet cafes available in China.  Of Internet users 63% have home access, 41% have to use InternetOf Internet users 63% have home access, 41% have to use Internet cafes.cafes.  In 2010, there were 9 million domain names registered underIn 2010, there were 9 million domain names registered under “.cn.”“.cn.”  China surpassed the U.S. as the world’s largest broadband userChina surpassed the U.S. as the world’s largest broadband user with more than 66.46 million residents subscribing to broadbandwith more than 66.46 million residents subscribing to broadband services.services. ACCESSIBILITACCESSIBILIT YY
    69. 69 Media Content in ChinaMedia Content in China
    70. 70 Newspaper ContentNewspaper Content  Reference News is the most widely read newspaperReference News is the most widely read newspaper in China, even among the Chinese that live inin China, even among the Chinese that live in America.America.  Most of the newspapers printed are broadsheets.Most of the newspapers printed are broadsheets.  Could not find a hard copy sample for ReferenceCould not find a hard copy sample for Reference News or any Chinese papers that are not printedNews or any Chinese papers that are not printed internationally.internationally. CONTENTCONTENT
    71. 71 Newspaper Content Proportions ExampleNewspaper Content Proportions Example ……  Paper: People’s DailyPaper: People’s Daily  Format: BroadsheetFormat: Broadsheet  Not an international paper, but they have aNot an international paper, but they have a website that’s translated in English.website that’s translated in English.  Respectability: It’s the National Voice of theRespectability: It’s the National Voice of the Party … draw your own conclusions.Party … draw your own conclusions.  Distinguishing Characteristics: Headlines, likeDistinguishing Characteristics: Headlines, like those of party dailies across the country, arethose of party dailies across the country, are done up in a wide variety of typefaces. Oftendone up in a wide variety of typefaces. Often compressed to the point of illegibility to fit acompressed to the point of illegibility to fit a long declaration over two columns.long declaration over two columns. CONTENTCONTENT
    72. 72 Newspaper Content Proportions  Most general, broadsheet newspapers are organizedMost general, broadsheet newspapers are organized into seven sections:into seven sections:  Prime: Top headlinesPrime: Top headlines  China: Domestic storiesChina: Domestic stories  Focus: Featured storiesFocus: Featured stories  Life: Entertainment, cultural events and soft newsLife: Entertainment, cultural events and soft news  View: Editorials and opinionView: Editorials and opinion  Business: Business NewsBusiness: Business News  Sports: Sports news from around the worldSports: Sports news from around the world CONTENTCONTENT
    73. 73 Public Radio ContentPublic Radio Content  The amount of radio advertising broadcast time is not restricted.The amount of radio advertising broadcast time is not restricted.  Advertising is restricted to certain products such as alcohol andAdvertising is restricted to certain products such as alcohol and tobacco.tobacco. CONTENTCONTENT
    74. 74 Example of Radio Program ScheduleExample of Radio Program Schedule CONTENTCONTENT
    75. 75 Television Content  CCTV is one of China’s main television networks.CCTV is one of China’s main television networks.  Examples of programming:Examples of programming:  Asia TodayAsia Today  4:00 am, 8:00 pm Mon-Sun4:00 am, 8:00 pm Mon-Sun  Biz ChinaBiz China  2:00 am, 6:00 am, 11:00 am, 2:00 pm, 6:00 pm, 9:002:00 am, 6:00 am, 11:00 am, 2:00 pm, 6:00 pm, 9:00 pm Mon-Sunpm Mon-Sun  Chinese CivilizationChinese Civilization  3:55 am, 9:55 am, 3:55 pm Mon-Fri3:55 am, 9:55 am, 3:55 pm Mon-Fri  3:55 am, 9:55 am Sat3:55 am, 9:55 am Sat  http://www.cctv.com/english/tvschedule/index.shtmlhttp://www.cctv.com/english/tvschedule/index.shtml CONTENTCONTENT
    76. 76 Television ContentTelevision Content  Most programming is similar to the United States in that theyMost programming is similar to the United States in that they run 30 – 60 minutes.run 30 – 60 minutes.  The government only allows commercials at the beginning andThe government only allows commercials at the beginning and end of programs and no more than five minutes of advertisingend of programs and no more than five minutes of advertising per hour.per hour.  Advertising involves longer segments with many short ads shownAdvertising involves longer segments with many short ads shown in sequence, some as short as five seconds.in sequence, some as short as five seconds.  Studies showed that when commercials were placed in the middle ofStudies showed that when commercials were placed in the middle of programs, they were ineffective.programs, they were ineffective. CONTENTCONTENT
    77. 77 Internet ContentInternet Content  Top Chinese Websites:Top Chinese Websites:  Internet Content ProvidersInternet Content Providers  Sina.comSina.com  News MediaNews Media  People’s Daily OnlinePeople’s Daily Online  Social NetworkingSocial Networking  XiaoneiXiaonei  Search EngineSearch Engine  BaiduBaidu  Entertainment and SportsEntertainment and Sports  GloballinkGloballink  China’s YouTubeChina’s YouTube  TudouTudou  China’s largest wiki siteChina’s largest wiki site  HudongHudong CONTENTCONTENT
    78. 78 Objectivity and BiasObjectivity and Bias  News organizations in China are funded throughNews organizations in China are funded through advertising as well as government funds. They areadvertising as well as government funds. They are primarily influenced by what the governmentprimarily influenced by what the government wants them to publish.wants them to publish.  Xinhua is the state run news organization that isXinhua is the state run news organization that is used as a propaganda tool for the country. This isused as a propaganda tool for the country. This is headed by the Chinese Communist Party.headed by the Chinese Communist Party. CONTENTCONTENT
    79. 79 Entertainment v. Serious ReportingEntertainment v. Serious Reporting  CCTV produces its own news broadcast. Their media are diverse.CCTV produces its own news broadcast. Their media are diverse.  The broadcast media in China contains diversified content.The broadcast media in China contains diversified content.  CCTV 12 carries most of the hard news stories in China because it coversCCTV 12 carries most of the hard news stories in China because it covers society and law, however, access to the website was denied.society and law, however, access to the website was denied.  The Chinese media is dominated by ordinary people (daily life/culture),The Chinese media is dominated by ordinary people (daily life/culture), scandals and celebrities.scandals and celebrities.  News presented is typically soft news covering politicians politicalNews presented is typically soft news covering politicians political issues (issues (http://www.nytimes.com/http://www.nytimes.com/) It is considered soft news) It is considered soft news because it is not presented with as much detail as it would be in thebecause it is not presented with as much detail as it would be in the U.S.U.S.  Cctv.cntv.cn (example of various channels showing different newsCctv.cntv.cn (example of various channels showing different news coveragecoverage  Media regulations are quite vague. If the government disagrees or wantsMedia regulations are quite vague. If the government disagrees or wants something kept quiet, they invite the journalists to tea.something kept quiet, they invite the journalists to tea.  China’s media is mainly dominated by propaganda. The communist partyChina’s media is mainly dominated by propaganda. The communist party wants the people reading, watching and listening to what the governmentwants the people reading, watching and listening to what the government finds important.finds important. CONTENTCONTENT
    80. 80 Entertainment v. Serious ReportingEntertainment v. Serious Reporting  Based off Xinhua, which is “the official press agency of the People'sBased off Xinhua, which is “the official press agency of the People's Republic of China,” Chinese news varies between hard news, sports,Republic of China,” Chinese news varies between hard news, sports, financefinance,, culture and entertainment.culture and entertainment.  Like an American news website, the option to choose what you wantLike an American news website, the option to choose what you want to read about is available. It can vary between world news about theto read about is available. It can vary between world news about the president meeting with foreign prime ministers or about celebrities,president meeting with foreign prime ministers or about celebrities, but it must be in the best interest of government. The front pagebut it must be in the best interest of government. The front page news does not promote entertainment.news does not promote entertainment.  Culture media stems from art, theater, fashion, movies and lifestyle.Culture media stems from art, theater, fashion, movies and lifestyle. The Chinese take a particular interest in American film. They alsoThe Chinese take a particular interest in American film. They also take interest in foreign entertainment, reviewing the Oscars andtake interest in foreign entertainment, reviewing the Oscars and anticipating celebrity babies like Prince William and Kateanticipating celebrity babies like Prince William and Kate Middleton’s baby. But even then, these aspects of entertainment areMiddleton’s baby. But even then, these aspects of entertainment are not feature stories, but rather side bars for people to glance at whennot feature stories, but rather side bars for people to glance at when they’re done reading the major news.they’re done reading the major news. CONTENTCONTENT
    81. 81 Standards of Depth v. BrevityStandards of Depth v. Brevity  NewspapersNewspapers  China’s general broadsheet format newspapers contain extensive coverage,China’s general broadsheet format newspapers contain extensive coverage, much like the United States. They will also continue news coverage of the topicmuch like the United States. They will also continue news coverage of the topic until it is no longer an issue. For example, the H7N9 Bird Flu is stilluntil it is no longer an issue. For example, the H7N9 Bird Flu is still spreading through China. They use a range of 2,000-3,000 characters perspreading through China. They use a range of 2,000-3,000 characters per story.story.  TelevisionTelevision  When it’s government related, the stories are 1-2 minutes. Non-governmentWhen it’s government related, the stories are 1-2 minutes. Non-government related stories are just under a minute, around 45 seconds. There are aboutrelated stories are just under a minute, around 45 seconds. There are about 5-7 major news stories per 30 minute segment.5-7 major news stories per 30 minute segment.  InternetInternet  Internet is relevant to newspapers. It covers hard news as well asInternet is relevant to newspapers. It covers hard news as well as entertainment. The Internet will cover a story for as long as necessary. As farentertainment. The Internet will cover a story for as long as necessary. As far as length of articles go, it’s hard to tell because each character is essentially anas length of articles go, it’s hard to tell because each character is essentially an “idea” rather than a specific word.“idea” rather than a specific word.  RadioRadio  In 2011, 6.94 million hours of radio was produced.In 2011, 6.94 million hours of radio was produced. CONTENTCONTENT
    82. 82 News Broadcasting Grid CONTENTCONTENT
    83. 83CONTENTCONTENT
    84. 84 CHINESE MEDIA IMPORTS AND EXPORTS
    85. 85 Import/Export Philosophy  China’s import/export philosophy can be defined as worldcentric for:China’s import/export philosophy can be defined as worldcentric for:  TelevisionTelevision  The most popular media format in China which imports from large surroundingThe most popular media format in China which imports from large surrounding Asian countries (Taiwan, South Korea, and Japan) and the US and exports to theAsian countries (Taiwan, South Korea, and Japan) and the US and exports to the countries in which most Chinese emigrate to. Also known as Chinese Diaspora.countries in which most Chinese emigrate to. Also known as Chinese Diaspora.  Diaspora is not a term specific to China, but is a term used to explain where people emigrated to fromDiaspora is not a term specific to China, but is a term used to explain where people emigrated to from their original country.their original country.  RadioRadio  It is rebroadcast online in an English format via satellite and podcast and isIt is rebroadcast online in an English format via satellite and podcast and is imported in news formats from all over the world with the approval of the Chineseimported in news formats from all over the world with the approval of the Chinese government.government.  China’s import/export philosophy can be defined as ethnocentric for:China’s import/export philosophy can be defined as ethnocentric for:  InternetInternet  It can be accessed worldwide but cannot be easily translated. One must understandIt can be accessed worldwide but cannot be easily translated. One must understand Chinese and its dialects. Chinese government regulates the websites which can beChinese and its dialects. Chinese government regulates the websites which can be viewed by the Chinese people, limiting websites such as Facebook, Twitter, Yahoo,viewed by the Chinese people, limiting websites such as Facebook, Twitter, Yahoo, etc.etc.  PrintPrint  There is a much larger ratio of imports over exports in print. Chinese printed mediaThere is a much larger ratio of imports over exports in print. Chinese printed media rarely leaves the country and there are very few publishing houses because they tendrarely leaves the country and there are very few publishing houses because they tend to export their products.to export their products. PHILOSOPHYPHILOSOPHY
    86. 86
    87. 87 Government/Regulatory Factors  No written media imports or exports have specificNo written media imports or exports have specific regulations other than that of Article 35 of theregulations other than that of Article 35 of the Constitution; “to be in the best interest of theConstitution; “to be in the best interest of the Motherland.” China is very protective in allowing theMotherland.” China is very protective in allowing the world to see and interpret their media production inworld to see and interpret their media production in all formats, which leads to minimal legal mediaall formats, which leads to minimal legal media exports. Any media exported by China is done underexports. Any media exported by China is done under very strict government oversight and must reflect thevery strict government oversight and must reflect the views of the “Motherland.”views of the “Motherland.”  Media imports - news and educational programming -Media imports - news and educational programming - support the views of the Communist Party of Chinasupport the views of the Communist Party of China and consist of 20% - 25% of the televisionand consist of 20% - 25% of the television programming in China. Prime-time television isprogramming in China. Prime-time television is beginning to catch on, but is limited to programsbeginning to catch on, but is limited to programs which do not counteract the views of the Communistwhich do not counteract the views of the Communist Party of China.Party of China. REGULATIONSREGULATIONS
    88. 88 China Media Imports - Newspapers  In terms of imported newspaper, China includes:In terms of imported newspaper, China includes:  Straits Times –Asian and international news printed in SingaporeStraits Times –Asian and international news printed in Singapore  Wall Street Journal Asia-published out of Hong KongWall Street Journal Asia-published out of Hong Kong  Printed in Hong Kong, Jakarta, Manila, Singapore, Tokyo, etc.Printed in Hong Kong, Jakarta, Manila, Singapore, Tokyo, etc.  USA Today Asia – published out of Hong KongUSA Today Asia – published out of Hong Kong  These publications are located in news stands in which GAPPThese publications are located in news stands in which GAPP finds appropriate. These include tourist attractions nearfinds appropriate. These include tourist attractions near government facilities.government facilities.  In terms of imported newspaper content, majorIn terms of imported newspaper content, major international newspapers focus on news includinginternational newspapers focus on news including Asian and International news; columns and editorials;Asian and International news; columns and editorials; home sections such as entertainment and sportinghome sections such as entertainment and sporting news; and in some publications, such as Straits Times,news; and in some publications, such as Straits Times, special sections on weekends including science andspecial sections on weekends including science and feature stories.feature stories. IMPORTSIMPORTS
    89. 89 China Media Imports - NewspapersChina Media Imports - Newspapers  When publishing international news reports, Chinese newsWhen publishing international news reports, Chinese news publications use Bloomberg News and other routers, suchpublications use Bloomberg News and other routers, such as the Associated Press, to report international businessas the Associated Press, to report international business news locally.news locally.  Bloomberg news logoBloomberg news logo IMPORTSIMPORTS
    90. 90 China Imports - RadioChina Imports - Radio  As previously illustrated in past sections on contentAs previously illustrated in past sections on content and news, Chinese public radio networks and stationsand news, Chinese public radio networks and stations are primarily focused on news and local culture. Thereare primarily focused on news and local culture. There are music stations which highlight the popular genresare music stations which highlight the popular genres of music such as pop, rock, classical, Top 40, etc.of music such as pop, rock, classical, Top 40, etc.  Much of China’s imported radio shows are listened toMuch of China’s imported radio shows are listened to as an online format.as an online format.  China has no privately owned imported or exportedChina has no privately owned imported or exported radio stations. All radio in China is regulated by theradio stations. All radio in China is regulated by the government and is considered public radio. Chinagovernment and is considered public radio. China imports cultural radio formats such as Metropolitanimports cultural radio formats such as Metropolitan Opera Radio Broadcast (along with 40 otherOpera Radio Broadcast (along with 40 other countries) and has a weekly series broadcastcountries) and has a weekly series broadcast transmitted live each week from the Metropolitan.transmitted live each week from the Metropolitan. IMPORTSIMPORTS
    91. 91 China’s Imports - TelevisionChina’s Imports - Television  Chinese television is primarily imported from Taiwan,Chinese television is primarily imported from Taiwan, U.S., South Korea, and Japan. Consequently these areU.S., South Korea, and Japan. Consequently these are China’s largest countries from which they import inChina’s largest countries from which they import in general.general.  China’s television imports primarily consist of newsChina’s television imports primarily consist of news and educational broadcast such as The Newsroom andand educational broadcast such as The Newsroom and CNN. Chinese government does reserve the right toCNN. Chinese government does reserve the right to pull any imported show at any time if it goes againstpull any imported show at any time if it goes against the views of the Communist Party of China.the views of the Communist Party of China. IMPORTSIMPORTS
    92. 92 China’s Imports - TelevisionChina’s Imports - Television  20%-25% of television programming is imported from20%-25% of television programming is imported from other countries. Prime-time programming fromother countries. Prime-time programming from Online TV company YouKu Tudou adds more licensedOnline TV company YouKu Tudou adds more licensed Hollywood shows, such as Glee and Survivor from theHollywood shows, such as Glee and Survivor from the US and Operation Love, a popular drama from Korea.US and Operation Love, a popular drama from Korea. Imported prime –time television is beginning toImported prime –time television is beginning to become a little more of a popular format.become a little more of a popular format.  China can import whichever genre of show they wishChina can import whichever genre of show they wish from any country or media outlet, regardless of wherefrom any country or media outlet, regardless of where it is from. This is done to bolster Chinese culture. Theit is from. This is done to bolster Chinese culture. The government can also remove any programs just as theygovernment can also remove any programs just as they did with the Korean television show Temptation of andid with the Korean television show Temptation of an Angel from their prime-time line up because of theAngel from their prime-time line up because of the show’s negative influence on Chinese culture.show’s negative influence on Chinese culture. IMPORTSIMPORTS
    93. 93 China Exports - NewspaperChina Exports - Newspaper  In accordance with the ethnocentric philosophy, theIn accordance with the ethnocentric philosophy, the English published China Daily broadsheet, is the onlyEnglish published China Daily broadsheet, is the only exported Chinese newspaper. This includes Chinaexported Chinese newspaper. This includes China Business Daily, which is a segment of the paper. TheBusiness Daily, which is a segment of the paper. The newspaper group is based in Beijing but hasnewspaper group is based in Beijing but has international offices.international offices.  The Americanized version of the paper is publishedThe Americanized version of the paper is published out of their New York and London based offices and isout of their New York and London based offices and is not a full translation of the Chinese version of thenot a full translation of the Chinese version of the paper.paper.  This newspaper is often used as both a teaching tool toThis newspaper is often used as both a teaching tool to learn how to speak English and understand thelearn how to speak English and understand the Chinese culture.Chinese culture.  http://usa.chinadaily.com.cn/http://usa.chinadaily.com.cn/ EXPORTSEXPORTS
    94. 94 China Exports - RadioChina Exports - Radio  China only operates importation and exportation of radioChina only operates importation and exportation of radio publicly through government funding. China exports radiopublicly through government funding. China exports radio shows via the Internet. The most popular radio stations inshows via the Internet. The most popular radio stations in China focus on news and government. Exports include radioChina focus on news and government. Exports include radio stations such as:stations such as:  China Radio InternationalChina Radio International  Business, world news, sports, travel, entertainment news, educationalBusiness, world news, sports, travel, entertainment news, educational broadcast (learn English & learn Chinese), and live broadcastsbroadcast (learn English & learn Chinese), and live broadcasts  China National RadioChina National Radio  The news based broadcasting format– not the information– isThe news based broadcasting format– not the information– is equivalent to that of America’s NPRequivalent to that of America’s NPR  http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=zh-http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=zh- CN&u=http://www.cnr.cn/&prev=/search%3Fq%3DchineseCN&u=http://www.cnr.cn/&prev=/search%3Fq%3Dchinese %2Bnational%2Bradio%26safe%3Dactive%26rlz%2Bnational%2Bradio%26safe%3Dactive%26rlz %3D1T4ADRA_enUS457US457%3D1T4ADRA_enUS457US457 EXPORTSEXPORTS
    95. 95 China Export- RadioChina Export- Radio  Due to the strict media, radio spillage is rare.Due to the strict media, radio spillage is rare.  Any signals that do slip through is irrelevant since the language is notAny signals that do slip through is irrelevant since the language is not understand by the other countries.understand by the other countries.  There is shortwave signals that are for in country.There is shortwave signals that are for in country.  However due to strict regulation, the signal are not accessible for outsideHowever due to strict regulation, the signal are not accessible for outside country.country. EXPORTSEXPORTS
    96. 96 China Exports – TelevisionChina Exports – Television  China is known for its high emphasis on their culture and arts.China is known for its high emphasis on their culture and arts. China primarily exports their drama and prime-timeChina primarily exports their drama and prime-time broadcasting to emphasize their culture to surrounding Asianbroadcasting to emphasize their culture to surrounding Asian countries and Chinese Diaspora (countries with Chinesecountries and Chinese Diaspora (countries with Chinese emigrants).emigrants).  Chinese drama “A beautiful Daughter-In-Law”Chinese drama “A beautiful Daughter-In-Law”  Chinese reality TV in the workplace “Go LaLa Go”Chinese reality TV in the workplace “Go LaLa Go”  Chinese Diaspora: U.S., Canada, Russia, India, Australia,Chinese Diaspora: U.S., Canada, Russia, India, Australia, England, Britain, Italy, Argentina, Chile, Costa Rica, Africa, etc.England, Britain, Italy, Argentina, Chile, Costa Rica, Africa, etc.  CCTV exports their most popular news broadcasting in foreignCCTV exports their most popular news broadcasting in foreign languages:languages:  CCTV Mandarin – Primary target market for Chinese DiasporaCCTV Mandarin – Primary target market for Chinese Diaspora  CCTV EnglishCCTV English  CCTV FrenchCCTV French  CCTV SpanishCCTV Spanish  CCTV ArabicCCTV Arabic EXPORTSEXPORTS
    97. 97 China export- TelevisionChina export- Television  Cable providers and satellite television has access to ChinaCable providers and satellite television has access to China television signals.television signals.  This means that an American audience can access ChineseThis means that an American audience can access Chinese television from their hometelevision from their home EXPORTSEXPORTS
    98. 98
    99. 99 Sources:  Sources:     Image of China Dispora: http://filipspagnoli.files.wordpress.com/2011/11/chinese-diaspora-map.jpg     (Television Export-Import Ratio)  Tunstall, Jeremy. (2006). THE IMPORT-EXPORT RATIO OF TELEVISION PROGRAMMING IN BIG POPULATION COUNTRIES. Intermedia (0309118X), 34(1), 18-22     (Chinese publishing and copy right trade)  Li, P. (2005). Current Situation of Chinese Publishing and Copyright Trade. Publishing Research Quarterly, 21(2), 49- 51     (A CASE STUDY OF ENGLISH-LANGUAGE NEWSPAPERS IN CHINA)  Messner, M., & Garrison B. (2006). News for the World: A Case Study of English0Language Newspapers in China. Conference Papers-- International Communication Association, 1-30.   
    100. 100 Sources  (Television Policy in China)  Tai Y. (2010). From Protectionism to Co-Optation: The Transition of the TV Drama Importation Policy in China- TOP STUDENT PAPER. Conference Papers-- International Communication Association, 1  (ProQuest- Joint ventures for television international companies)  DICKIE, M. (2006, Dec 12). An area where imports outweigh exports MEDIA AND CULTURE: From film to books, the country suffers a trade imbalance that seems entrenched, despite attempts to limit foreign penetration, reports mure dickie. Financial Times. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.library.unlv.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/249972548?accountid=3611  (Governmental Regulations of Foreign Media)  Hong, Junahao. “The Internationalization of Television in China: The Evolution of Ideology, Society, and Media Since the Reform.” Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data. Westport, CT. 1998  Strait Times  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Straits_Times  Metropolitan Opera Radio and Broadcast  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metropolitan_Opera_radio_broadcasts  Imported Television Dramas  http://variety.com/2013/tv/international/chinese-auds-appetite-for-u-s-tv-shows-grows-1200330257/  (Korean TV show imported to China)  http://www.globaltimes.cn/NEWS/tabid/99/ID/696030/Foreign-TV-dramas-restricted-in-China.aspx
    101. 101 Sources  http://factsanddetails.com/china.php  http://programme.rthk.hk/channel/radio/index.php?c=dab33  http://Internetworldstats.com/asia.htm#cn  http://www.danwei.org/media_and_advertising/know_your_chinese_newspapers_t.php  Buke, I., Erevelles, S., Morgan, F., & Nguyen, R. (2002). Advertising Strategy in China: An Analysis of Cultural and Regulatory Factors. Journal of International Consumer Marketing. Vol. 15 (1), pp. 105-106.  http://www.edu.cn/20010101/22272.shtml  http://www.cctv.com/english/tvschedule/index.shtml  http://www.statista.com/statistics/224593/length-of-produce-radio-programs-in- china/
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