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This report provides a demographic and economic snapshot of Boston’s foreign-born population. This recent update contains new data and calculations using the most recent American Community Survey, ...

This report provides a demographic and economic snapshot of Boston’s foreign-born population. This recent update contains new data and calculations using the most recent American Community Survey, a yearly survey by the U.S. Census Bureau to allow communities to see how they are changing in the years between decennial censuses.

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New Bostonians 2012 New Bostonians 2012 Presentation Transcript

  • Mayor’s Office of New Bostonians Cheng Imm Tan, Director New Bostonians 2012Research DivisionAlvaro Lima, Director 1
  • This report was prepared for the Mayor’s Office of NewBostonians by Mark Melnik and BRA Research Divisionstaff, under the direction of Alvaro Lima, Director.Special thanks to Joshua Silverblatt for his invaluablerole in creating this report.The information provided within this report is the bestavailable at the time of its publication. City of Boston Thomas M. Menino, MayorAll or partial use of thedata found withinthis report must be cited.Our preferredcitation is as follows:Boston Redevelopment Boston Redevelopment AuthorityAuthority/Research Peter Meade, DirectorDivision, October 2012. Alvaro Lima, Director of Research 2
  • New Bostonians 2012 Table of Contents Demographics 4 Languages 15 Boston’s Neighborhood Diversity 22 Economic Contributions and Labor Force 31 English Proficiency 37 Educational Attainment 39 Homeownership 41 Citizenship 43 References 45 3
  • New Bostonians 2012 Demographics 4
  • 39.3 Million Immigrants Live in the U.S. (2010)  Immigrants account for more than 1 in 7 residents (12.8%), the highest percentage since 1930 (12%).  83.7% more immigrants live in the United States now than in 1990.  Between 2000 and 2010, immigrants accounted for 50.3% of the nation’s population growth. In 2010, the nation’s largest immigrant groups were Latinos and Asians:  53% are from Latin America;  28% are from Asia;  12% are from Europe;  7% are from other regions in the world including Northern America and Oceania. 5Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey 2008-2010. U.S. Bureau of the Census, 2000 SF1. BRA Research Analysis
  • Massachusetts has the 7th Largest Immigrant Population  As of 2010, the Massachusetts (MA) immigrant population totaled 964,530 or 14.7% of the state’s population.  Between 2000 and 2010, 337,746 new immigrants came to MA. If not for this influx, the population would have decreased.  Between 2000 and 2010, 35.4% of MA immigrants were from Latin America and the Caribbean and 28.6% were from Asia.  China has become the largest source of immigrants in MA. By 2010, 80,737 immigrants in MA were Chinese, followed by Brazilians who total 68,197.Sources: American Fact Finder, American Community Survey 2008-2010. U.S.. Bureau of the Census, 2000 SF1. BRA Research Division Analysis. 6
  • Boston’s Immigrant Population is Growing  Over the last two decades the share of Boston’s foreign-born population has increased at a faster pace than Massachusetts and the U.S.  In 1990, 114,597 immigrants accounted for 20% of the city’s total population.  In 2010, Boston had 617,594 residents, with the foreign born accounting for approximately 27% of the population.  Boston’s foreign-born population comes predominantly from the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Africa and represents more than 100 different countries.  Dominican Republic immigrants make up 23.3% of all immigrants from Latin America.  Immigrants from the Caribbean make up the largest share of Boston’s Immigrant population, totaling 46,444.Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, BRA Research Analysis. American Community Survey, 2008-2010, BRA Research Analysis 7
  • Boston’s Minority Groups Have Become the City’s New “Majority” Latinos (17.5%), Asians (8.9%), and Blacks or African Americans (22.4%) together with other minorities make up 53% of the city’s total population. Since 1990, the Latino population has increased by 74.2% and the Asian population by 85.0%. 2000 1990 2010 0.3% 4.5% 1.6% 2.4% 0.3% 1.0% 7.5% 8.9% 5.2% 0.2% 10.8% 14.4% 49.5% 17.5% 47.0% 23.8% 59.0% 23.8% 22.4% White Black or African American Hispanic or Latino Asian Native American OtherSource: Liming L., Perkins, G., Goetze, R., Vrabel, J., Lewis G., & Consalvo, R., (2001) Boston’s Population – 2000, Changes in Population, Race, Ethnicity in Boston and Boston’s Neighborhoods – 1980 to 2000. Boston: Boston Redevelopment Authority. 8Source: 2010 Census, Research Division Analysis
  • New Bostonians Leading Countries of Origin Top 10 Countries of Origin for the Foreign-Born Population, 2008-2010 Dominican Republic 18,189 China 16,785 Haiti 13,782 Vietnam 7,684 El Salvador 7,575 Colombia 6,703 Cape Verde 6,457 Jamaica 5,637 Brazil 4,823 India 4,203 - 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 9Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey, 2008-2010, BRA Research Division Analysis
  • New Bostonians are a Growing Population  Boston had the 6th highest proportion of foreign-born residents among the 25 largest U.S. cities in 2010.  Half of New Bostonians come from the Americas (49.4%), followed by Asia (25.4%), Europe (14.6%), and Africa (10.5%).  The four largest immigrant groups in Boston in 2010 were from China (10.3%), Haiti (8.5%), Vietnam (4.7%), and El Salvador (4.7%).Note: *Central America includes Mexico. ** Other includes Northern America and Oceania 10Source: American Fact Finder, American Community Survey, 2008-2010. Brookings Institution Living Cities, BRA Research Division Analysis.
  • Boston’s Central, and South American Leading Countries of Origin (2008-2010) Central America South America 1% 3% 6% 12% 3% 6% 16% 5% 33% Brazil Mexican 3% Colombian Costa Rica 2% El Salvador Ecuador Guatemala Guyana Honduras Peru 20% Nicaragua Venezuela Panama Other South America 45% 45% 11Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey, 2008-2010, BRA Research Division Analysis
  • Boston’s European, Asian, and African Leading Countries of Origin (2008-2010) Europe Asia Africa 5.6% 6.7% 2.0% 11.9% 19.6% 3.9% 28.7% 28.5% 4.1% 2.2% 40.6% 5.3% 4.2% 2.8% 18.6% 37.9% 8.3% 9.8% 12.7% 12.7% 5.2% 3.2% 4.1% 10.2% 5.7% 4.5% 3.7% China Japan England Ireland France Germany Ethiopia Kenya Morocco Korea India Greece Italy Albania Poland Vietnam Turkey Cape Verde Ghana Liberia Russia Ukraine Other Nigeria Sierra Leone OtherSource: American Fact Finder, American Community Survey, 2008-2010, BRA Research Division Analysis 12
  • Boston’s Leading Latino Ethnic Groups (2008-2010) Puerto Rican Dominican Mexican Cuban 0.0% 5.0% 10.0% 15.0% 20.0% 25.0% 30.0% 35.0% 40.0% 45.0% 50.0%Note: The Census defines people hailing from US territories as “native-born” . As a result, Puerto Ricans are considered native-born and are not included in ourforeign-born figures. Race reported as Hispanic or Latino (of any race). 13Source: U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey, 2008-2010, BRA Research Division Analysis
  • Boston’s Most Common Ancestries Boston’s Ancestry, 2000 and 2010  Irish and Italian are the first and Ancestry 2000 2010 second leading ancestries. The 1 Irish 76,652 81,735 2 Italian 40,716 38,432 population of those identifying 3 English 15,528 20,402 themselves as “Irish” grew 6.6% 4 Haitian 18,790 19,212 between 2000 and 2010. Those 5 German 13,855 15,345 identifying themselves as “Italian” 6 7 American Cape Verdean 19,387 10,878 10,482 10,324 decreased by 5.6% during the same 8 Polish 9,176 10,094 time period. 9 Russian 8,124 9,202 10 French 5,938 7,234 11 Jamaican 7,804 7,206  Brazilians have witnessed a 31% 12 Scottish 4,777 5,266 13 Brazilian 3,470 4,545 increase between 2000 and 2010 14 French Canadian 4,811 4,382 15 Greek 4,693 4,095 16 Portuguese 3,225 3,799  Albanians, who were not included as 17 Swedish 2,457 2,887 part of the top 20 countries in 2000, 18 Trinidadian and Tobagonian 3,072 2,735 grew by 63.4% over the decade. 19 West Indian 2,860 2,517 20 Albanian 1,339 2,188Note: *American refers to people who identified their ancestry as "American", "United States", as a region such as "Southerner", or as a U.S. state such as "Texan“ (U.S. Census).Sources: U.S. Bureau of the Census, BRA Research Division Analysis. 14American Community Survey, 2008-2010, Public Use Microdata Sample, BRA Research Analysis .
  • New Bostonians 2012 Languages 15
  • New Bostonians Speak Over 140 Languages  In 2008-2010, over 35% of residents spoke a language other than English at home, up from almost 26% in 1990.  Over 15% of residents speak Spanish at home up from 9.5% in 1990.  6.8% speak an Asian language at home, up from 4% in 1990.  Over 11% of residents speak an Indo-European language at home. 16Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Fact Finder, American Community Survey, 2008-2010, BRA Research Division Analysis
  • Leading Languages Spoken in Boston  The most common languages spoken (other than English) include: Spanish, Indo-European, French, Chinese, Vietnamese, and Slavic Languages.  65% of Boston residents over 5 years old speak only English, 35% speak a language other than English. 15.2% 16.0% 14.0% 12.0% 10.0% 8.0% 4.8% 6.0% 3.8% 4.0% 2.0% 1.7% 1.3% 2.0% 0.0% Spanish *French Chinese Portuguese Vietnamese African Languages*French includes French Creole, Patois, and Cajun 17Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey, 2008-2010 Estimates, BRA Research Analysis
  • New Bostonian Youth Speak Many Languages Student Demographics for the Boston Public  24,140 or 42.7% of BPS students Schools (BPS) speak a language other than 2.0% English at home. 13.0%  11,840 or 21% of BPS students are classified as Limited English 9.0% 39.0% Proficient or English Language Learners.  3,260 BPS students are former Limited English Proficient.  Every year, approximately 200- 37.0% 300 high school age immigrants enter Boston Public Schools, Spanish Black Asian White Other usually in 11th or 12th grade. 18Source: Boston Public Schools. (2008). Boston Public Schools at a Glance 2009-2010. Boston: BPS Communication Office
  • Immigrant Youth are Critical to the State’s Future Nativity of Children 0-17 Years of Age in Nativity of Parents for Children 0-17 Years Boston Old in Boston 8.8% Both parents native Child is native born 46.4% born Child is foreign born 53.6% Both parents foreign born 91.2%  While only 8.8% of Boston’s children are foreign-born, more than 46% are the children of immigrants.  This shows that immigration is a critical childhood education issue.Note: Living with native-born parent(s) is defined as either living in a single parent home with a native-born parent or living in a home with two native-born parents. Livingwith foreign-born parent(s) is defined as either living in a single parent home with a foreign-born parent or living in a home with two foreign-born parents 19Source: U.S. Census Bureau,, American Community Survey, 2008-2010 estimates. BRA Research Analysis
  • Boston is a Multilingual and Diverse City Languages Other than English Spoken at Home, 2010  In all Boston neighborhoods 35.5% of the total population speak a language other than English at home.  Planning Districts with the highest share of people speaking a language other than English at home are East Boston (67%), Dorchester (42%), Roslindale (41%), Roxbury (40%), Hyde Park (38%) and the South End (37%)  Spanish is highly represented in East Boston, Roxbury, and Jamaica Plain with 30% of people speaking Spanish at home. 20Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, American Community Survey 2006-2010, BRA Research Division Analysis.
  • Boston’s Adults With English as a Second Language and Literacy Sites by Planning District  4 Planning Districts account for 80% of *intensive English for speakers of other languages (ESOL) programs: Jamaica Plain (29%), Dorchester (22%), Downtown (15%), and South Boston (14%). *intensive programs require 9+ instruction hrs/weeks  From 2000-2010 there was a 34% increase in the adult Hispanic population and a 32% increase in the adult Asian population  In 2010, there were 3,687 students enrolled in a Boston program.Source: Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC). Boston Adult Literacy Initiative, U.S. Census Bureau 2000,Massachusetts Geographic Information System (MassGIS). Massachusetts Department of Education, Adult and 21Community Learning Services.
  • New Bostonians 2012 Boston’s Planning District Diversity 22
  • New Bostonians Mean Diverse Planning Districts Many of Boston’s Planning Districts have experienced an North 2010 2000 Dorchester increase in diversity between Back Bay/ Beacon Hill 0.80 South Dorchester 2000 and 2010. South Boston 0.70 Harbor Islands 0.60 0.50 The Planning Districts that have Mattapan 0.40 Boston experienced the most dramatic 0.30 increases are: 0.20 West Roxbury Charlestown South End  0.10  South Boston 0.00  Back Bay/Beacon Hill West Roxbury Roslindale  Roxbury  Charlestown Central Hyde Park The Planning Districts that have Allston/ witnessed a loss in diversity are: Jamaica Plain Brighton Feneway/  East Boston Kenmore East Boston Roxbury  Jamaica Plain  South EndSource: Liming L., Perkins, G., Goetze, R., Vrabel, J., Lewis G., & Consalvo, R., (2001) Boston’s Population – 2000, Changes in 23 Population, Race, Ethnicity in Boston and Boston’s Neighborhoods – 1980 to 2000. U.S. Census Bureau. Boston Redevelopment Authority.
  • Planning Districts: East Boston and Roslindale  From 2000 to 2010, East Boston’s non-White population grew from 52% to 62%.  As of 2010, Latinos made up 54% of East Boston’s population.  From 2000 to 2010, Roslindale’s White population decreased by 31%.  Roslindale’s population is very mixed, with a large number of Latinos and African American. East Boston (2010) Roslindale (2010)60.0% 60.0%50.0% 50.0%40.0% 40.0%30.0% 30.0%20.0% 20.0%10.0% 10.0% 0.0% 0.0% Hispanic or White Black or Asian Other Hispanic or White Black or Asian Other Latino African Latino African American AmericanU.S. Bureau of the Census 2010, Summary File 1. Selvarajah, E. Vrabel, J. ,Cenusus 2000, Key Neighborhood Characteristics, Comparative Data on Neighborhoods and 24Boston, 15 April 2004. American Community Survey 2006-2010. Boston Redevelopment Authority.
  • Planning Districts: Allston/Brighton and Hyde Park  As of 2010, minorities made up 32% of Allston/Brighton’s population, increasing by 8% since 2000.  Minorities make up nearly three quarters of Hyde Park’s current population (71%), compared to 57% in 2000.  The number of white residents in Hyde Park has decreased by 33% over the decade. Allston/Brighton Hyde Park60,000 16,000 14,00050,000 12,00040,000 10,00030,000 8,00020,000 6,000 4,00010,000 2,000 0 0 Hispanic or White Black or Asian Other Hispanic or White Black or Asian Other Latino African Latino African American American 2010 2000 2010 2000U.S. Bureau of the Census 2010, Summary File 1. Selvarajah, E. Vrabel, J. ,Cenusus 2000, Key Neighborhood Characteristics, Comparative Data on Neighborhoods and 25Boston, 15 April 2004. Boston Redevelopment Authority.
  • Planning Districts: Dorchester  As of 2010, non-Whites made up more than three quarters of Dorchester’s population (77%).  The largest group in this neighborhood is Black/African Americans, increasing by 41% over the decade from 2000 to 2010. Dorchester50.0%45.0%40.0%35.0%30.0%25.0%20.0%15.0%10.0% 5.0% 0.0% Hispanic or Latino White Black or African American Asian Other 2010 2000U.S. Bureau of the Census 2010, Summary File 1. Selvarajah, E. Vrabel, J. ,Cenusus 2000, Key Neighborhood Characteristics, Comparative Data on Neighborhoods and 26Boston, 15 April 2004. Boston Redevelopment Authority.
  • Between 2000 and 2010, All of Boston’s Planning Districts Experienced Changes in the Foreign-Born Population 2000 2010 Changes Percent of Foreign Percent of Foreign Planning Districts Absolute Percent Foreign Born Born in Foreign Born Born in Change Change Neighborhood Neighborhood Boston Total 151,836 26.0% 163,052 26.7% 11,216 6.9% East Boston 16,051 45.0% 20,611 50.3% 4,560 22.1% Mattapan 10,706 31.0% 12,115 33.3% 1,409 11.6% Dorchester 29,492 32.0% 26,278 31.8% -3,214 -12.2% Allston/Brighton 22,016 33.0% 20,831 30.6% -1,185 -5.7% Hyde Park 8,246 28.0% 9,685 29.9% 1,439 14.9% Roslindale 9,048 28.0% 9,442 28.7% 394 4.2% Roxbury 12,501 24.0% 15,811 25.9% 3,310 20.9% Central 6,480 26.0% 8,085 24.8% 1,605 19.9% South End 6,201 23.0% 7,334 24.5% 1,133 15.4% Fenway/Kenmore 7,974 23.0% 9,073 21.8% 1,099 12.1% West Roxbury 4,929 18.0% 6,168 21.1% 1,239 20.1% Jamaica Plain 9,157 25.0% 8,749 21.0% -408 -4.7% Charlestown 2,111 15.0% 2,313 13.9% 202 8.7% South Boston 3,717 13.0% 3,723 11.6% 6 0.2% Back Bay/Beacon Hill 3,155 12.0% 3,197 9.8% 42 1.3% 27Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, American Community Survey 2006-2010 estimates. BRA Research Division Analysis.
  • Planning Districts with a Share of Foreign-Born Higher than the City Average  East Boston has the highest share of the foreign-born population, accounting for 50% of the population and increasing by 22% over the last decade.  Salvadorans make up the largest proportion of foreign-born residents in East Boston.  Mattapan is the neighborhood with the second largest share of foreign-born residents (33%). Haitians make up the largest foreign-born group in this neighborhood, at 29%. Top Countries of Origin Top Countries of Origin East Boston Mattapan El Salvador Haiti Colombia Jamaica Brazil Cape Verde Mexico Dominican Republic Italy Trinidad and Tobago 0.0% 5.0% 10.0% 15.0% 20.0% 25.0% 30.0% 0.0% 5.0% 10.0% 15.0% 20.0% 25.0% 30.0% 28Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, American Community Survey 2006-2010 estimates. BRA Research Division Analysis.
  • Planning Districts with a Share of Foreign-Born Higher than the City Average  Dorchester is home to the third largest share of foreign-born residents among the city’s neighborhoods.  Cape Verdeans make up the largest population of foreign-born residents in Dorchester.  Allston/Brighton has the fourth largest share of foreign-born residents. Chinese, who are Boston’s second largest foreign-born population are the largest in Allston/Brighton as well. Top Countries of Origin Top Countries of Origin Dorchester Allston/Brighton Cape Verde China Vietnam Brazil Haiti Russia Dominican Republic El Salvador Jamaica Ukraine 0.0% 5.0% 10.0% 15.0% 20.0% 0.0% 5.0% 10.0% 15.0% 20.0% 29Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, American Community Survey 2006-2010 estimates. BRA Research Division Analysis.
  • Planning Districts with a Share of Foreign-Born Higher than the City Average  Hyde Park has the fifth largest share of the foreign-born population. Haitians make up the largest group in this neighborhood, 23% more than the next largest.  30% of Hyde Park and 29% Roslindale are foreign-born. Dominicans make up the largest foreign-born population here. The proportion of the Dominican population in Roslindale is double that of Hyde Park. Top Countries of Origin Top Countries of Origin Hyde Park Roslindale Haiti Dominican Republic Dominican Republic Haiti Jamaica Albania Nigeria Guatemale Guatemale Ireland 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 0.0% 5.0% 10.0% 15.0% 20.0% 30Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, American Community Survey 2006-2010 estimates. BRA Research Division Analysis.
  • New Bostonians 2012Economic Contributions & LaborForce 31
  • Immigrants are Significant Economic Contributors  Immigrants in Boston spend, from their after tax earnings, just over $4.0 billion annually. These annual expenditures generate a regional product of $4.0 billion and $1.3 billion in state and federal taxes.  Annual expenditures generate over 25,800 additional jobs in the local economy.  Immigrants further contribute to Boston’s economy through entrepreneurship.  They own more than 8,800* small businesses in the greater Boston area in different industry sectors.  Combined, these businesses represent almost $3.7 billion in annual sales and employ close to 18,500 people.  They contribute about $3.6 billion to the regional product, $293 million in state and federal taxes and they create an additional 16,900 jobs.Note: * Included individual proprieties and self-employed contractors. Data based on the 2007 Economic Census and includes all Hispanic and Asian owned businesses 32Source: Regional Economic Model, Inc. (REMI), BRA Research Division Analysis
  • Immigrants are Critical Contributors to the Labor Force  67.9% of the nation’s immigrants were a part of the labor force in 2010, compared to 64.1% of the native-born.  Immigrants help to fill both the high-skill and low-skill jobs in the labor market statewide.  From 2000 to 2010, without immigrants, the state’s labor force would have shrunk. By 2010, immigrants accounted for 17.1% of the state’s workforce, a sharp increase from 1980 when immigrants were only at 8.8%.  Immigrants are much more likely to be between 25 and 44 years old than the natives. This group can potentially play a pivotal role in replacing the soon to retire baby boomers in the labor force.  Immigrants will be critical to filling future labor gaps; 76 million baby boomers will retire by 2030, while only 46 million native-born workers will have entered the workforce.U.S. Bureau of the Census, Public Use Micro Sample Data (PUMS) 2008-2010. The Changing Workforce: Immigrants and the New Economy in Massachusetts. Boston.;Clayton-Matthews, A,, Wantanabe, P, and Karp, F. The Immigrant Learning Center (2009). Massachusetts Immigrants by the Numbers: Demographic Characteristics and 33Economic Footprint. Malden, MA.; http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/forbrn.pdf
  • New Bostonians are Employed in Many Industries  11.6% of both naturalized and non-naturalized immigrants work in blue collar industries including construction and extraction, production, transportation, instillation and maintenance occupations.  45% of naturalized immigrants in the labor force, compared to just under 42% non-naturalized immigrants in the labor force, work in "knowledge-based" industries including finance, professional services, health services, management, business and education.  28% of non-naturalized immigrants work in retail, administration support, personal care, protective, accommodation and food service industries compared to 31% of naturalized citizens.Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, Public Use Microdata (5%) Sample 2008-2010 American Community Survey (PUMS), BRA Research Division Analysis. 34
  • New Bostonian’s Leading Industries Healthcare/Social Services Professional Services Accomidation/Food Education Retail Trade Other Services Manufacturing Construction Arts & Entertainment Administrative Finance/InsuranceTransportation & Warehousing Wholesale Trade Real Estate Information Public Administration Agriculture Mining Utilities Management 0.0% 2.0% 4.0% 6.0% 8.0% 10.0% 12.0% 14.0% 16.0% 18.0% 20.0%Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, Public Use Microdata Sample 2008-2010 (PUMS), BRA Research Division Analysis 35
  • New Bostonian’s Leading Occupations Services Managerial & ProfessionalTechnical, Sales and Administrative Support Construction, Extraction & Transportation Production Arts, Entertainment & Media Community and Social Services Other 0.0% 5.0% 10.0% 15.0% 20.0% 25.0% 30.0%Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, Public Use Microdata Sample 2008-2010 (PUMS), BRA Research Division Analysis 36
  • New Bostonians 2012 English Proficiency 37
  • New Bostonians and English Proficiency Since 1980, the overall share of immigrants in MA who speak only English has decreased from 35% to 18.7%, while the share with Limited English Proficiency increased from 17.5% to 23.2% in 2010. In 2010, 55,085* or 9.5% of all Boston residents lacked English proficiency compared to 6% in 1990.  Almost one-third of all Spanish speakers are Limited English Proficient (29%).  Of all Asian language speakers**, just over one-third are Limited English Proficient (38%). Nearly 23,000 households in Boston are linguistically isolated, in which no person aged 14 years and over is English Proficient. In 2010, almost one half of all adult immigrants in Boston (47.9%) either lack a high school diploma or have Limited English Proficiency.•Note: The Limited English Proficient includes immigrant adults who do not speak English at all or who do not speak it well. The English Proficient includes immigrant adults who speak only English,speak it very well or speak it well.•** Asian Languages include Hindi, Bengali, Panjabi, Marathi, Gujarathi, Urdu, Nepali, Chinese, Cantonese, Mandarin, Thai, Japanese, Korean, Laotian, Cambodian, Vietnamese , Indonesian and others.Consalvo, R. (2002). Demographic Changes 1990-2000. Boston: Boston Redevelopment Authority, presented at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston’s Banking on the Community Conference, October8, 2002. 38U.S. Bureau of Census, Public Use Microdata Sample 2008-2010 (PUMS), BRA Research Division Analysis.
  • New Bostonians 2012 Educational Attainment 39
  • Educational Attainment For residents 25 years and older, in Boston:  Nearly 1 out of 3 immigrants (30.4%) has a bachelors degree or higher, compared to the city average of 43.7%.  28.8% have not completed high school, compared to the city’s 15.7%. Educational Attainment, 2010 Doctorate degree Professional degree Masters degree Bachelors degree Associate degreeOne + yrs college, no degree Some college, under 1 year High school graduate Foreign-Born 12th grade, no diploma 11th grade Native-Born 10th grade 9th grade 7th/8th grade 5th/6th gradeNursery school to 4th grade No schooling completed 0.0% 5.0% 10.0% 15.0% 20.0% 25.0%Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, Public Use Microdata Sample 2008-2010 (PUMS), BRA Research Division Analysis. 40
  • New Bostonians 2012 Homeownership 41
  • Half of New Bostonian Householders Own Their Home  Just over half of foreign-born householders own a home in Boston, compared to 67.8% of native-headed households.  In Massachusetts, the total value of immigrant owned homes was $81.3 billion in 2007.  The average home value of immigrant and native homeowners was very similar ($421,000 for immigrants versus $415,000 for natives)  Approximately 49% of immigrant headed households rent a home in Boston. The gross rent paid was $2.3 billion or an average of $1,039 per month per rental unit.Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, Public Use Microdata Sample 2008-2010 (PUMS), BRA Research Division Analysis ; Clayton-Matthews, A,, Wantanabe, P, and Karp, F. The 42Immigrant Learning Center (2009). Massachusetts Immigrants by the Numbers: Demographic Characteristics and Economic Footprint. Malden, MA
  • New Bostonians 2012 Citizenship 43
  • Many New Bostonians are Becoming U.S. Citizens  1 in 8 Boston residents is a naturalized citizen, up from 1 in 14 in 1990. Citizenship Status for the Foreign-born Population in Boston, 2010 Naturalized U.S. Non-Naturalized Citizen Citizen 45% 55%Source: Consalvo, R. (2002). Demographic Changes 1990-2000. Boston: Boston Redevelopment Authority, presented at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston’s Banking on the Community Conference, October 8, 2002; American Community Survey, 2008-2010, American Fact Finder, BRA Research Analysis . 44
  • ReferencesBoston Public Schools. (2008). Boston Public Schools at a Glance 2009-2010. Boston: BPS Communication Office.Brookings Institution Center on Urban and Metropolitan Policy & Living Cities: The National Community Development Initiative. (2003). Boston in Focus: A Profile from Census 2000. Washington DC.Camarota, S, A., (2001). Immigrants in the United States - 2000: A snapshot of Americas Foreign-born population. Center for Immigration Studies: Washington DC.Consalvo, R. (2002). Demographic Changes 1990-2000. Boston: Boston Redevelopment Authority. Presented at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston’s Banking on the Community Conference, October 8, 2002.Clayton-Matthews, A,, Wantanabe, P, and Karp, F. The Immigrant Learning Center (2009). Massachusetts Immigrants by the Numbers: Demographic Characteristics and Economic Footprint. Malden, MA 45
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