PRINCIPLES OF MAMAGEMENT    Summary Of Management Basics                          Ashraf Alsinglawi                       ...
Introduction- Managers in The    Workforce       The role of a manager in organizations is complex.       While managers...
Management in Organizations: Top,    Middle & Low Level Managers       Top-Level Managers: Top management is made up of s...
Management in Organizations: Top,    Middle & Low Level Managers       Middle-Level Management: this level of managers re...
Management in Organizations: Top,    Middle & Low Level Managers       Low-Level Management: Low-level managers work most...
Summary       Management is the use of people and resources to accomplish organizational        objectives. Managers can ...
Managerial Skills: How Good Managers        Promote Productivity     Managerial Skill Sets: are what the manager    uses ...
Managerial Skills: How Good Managers    Promote Productivity       Technical Skills: are those skills needed to        ac...
Managerial Skills: How Good Managers    Promote Productivity       Human Skills: are what a manager will use to work     ...
Managerial Skills: How Good Managers     Promote Productivity        Conceptual Skills: The level of analytical ability t...
Summary        Managerial skills are necessary for a manager to perform their job         successfully. There are three d...
Henry Mintzberg’s Managerial Roles        At any given moment a manager might have to be a coach, a         strategic pla...
Henry Mintzberg’s Managerial Roles        Interpersonal Roles: These roles involve the behaviors associated         with ...
Henry Mintzberg’s Managerial Roles        Informational Roles: Include those roles in which a manager         must genera...
Henry Mintzberg’s Managerial Roles        Decisional Roles: All of these roles involve the process of using         infor...
Henry Mintzberg’s Managerial Roles      Mintzbergs  Managerial Roles Today:      Managers of all levels perform the role...
Summary        There are many roles a manager has within an         organization. Henry Mintzberg described ten specific ...
Four Functions of Management: Planning,     Organizing, Leading & Controlling      Planning:   In this step the manager  ...
Four Functions of Management: Planning,     Organizing, Leading & Controlling    Organizing: to determine how manager wil...
Four Functions of Management: Planning,     Organizing, Leading & Controlling        Leading: manager spends time connect...
Four Functions of Management: Planning,         Organizing, Leading & Controlling        Controlling: the manager evaluat...
Four Functions of Management: Planning,     Organizing, Leading & Controlling        The Fifth Function: Staffing is the ...
Summary        There are four functions of management that span across all industries. They         include: planning, or...
Hearing is a gift, Listening is a skill                               alsinglawi@gmail.com                               0...
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Principles of management

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summary of management basics

  1. 1. PRINCIPLES OF MAMAGEMENT Summary Of Management Basics Ashraf Alsinglawi B.Sc. Pharmacy, MBA1 02/03/2013 Ashraf Alsinglawi
  2. 2. Introduction- Managers in The Workforce  The role of a manager in organizations is complex.  While managers can come in different shapes and sizes they all share the task of utilizing people and resources to achieve organizational goals.  The general goal is to achieve the competitive advantage by setting goals, making plans, motivating & mobilizing people, gathering & distributing resources and monitoring & assessing objectives.  The roles and responsibilities of a particular manager has correlates to their position in the organization.  He or she provides the necessary support from the bottom up, and also provides oversight to all of the parts in between.2 02/03/2013 Ashraf Alsinglawi
  3. 3. Management in Organizations: Top, Middle & Low Level Managers  Top-Level Managers: Top management is made up of senior- level executives of an organization, or those positions that hold the most responsibility.  Jobs titles such as Chief Operating Officer (COO), Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Chief Financial Officer (CFO), President, or Vice President.  responsible for setting the overall direction of a company and making sure that major organizational objectives are achieved. Their leadership role can extend over the entire organization or for specific divisions such as finance, marketing, human resources, or operations.3 02/03/2013 Ashraf Alsinglawi
  4. 4. Management in Organizations: Top, Middle & Low Level Managers  Middle-Level Management: this level of managers report to top management and serve as the head of major departments and their specialized units and serve as a liaison between top managers and the rest of the organization from a very unique standpoint.  Middle managers essentially have the important role of designing, selecting, and carrying out the best plan possible as a means of propelling a company towards its overall goals.  Job titles of middle managers include directors, assistant directors, regional directors, division mangers, deans, branch managers, site managers, and so on.4 02/03/2013 Ashraf Alsinglawi
  5. 5. Management in Organizations: Top, Middle & Low Level Managers  Low-Level Management: Low-level managers work most closely with the greater workforce and hold a much more interpersonal role than any of the other levels of management.  These managers work to ensure that individual employees are meeting their performance goals in a way that aligns with the organizational goals, such as completing a set number of projects by a specific deadline or selling a set number of products within a certain period of time.  Titles such as accounting manager, academic affairs manager, human resources manager, head of financial operations, sales leader, and so on.5 02/03/2013 Ashraf Alsinglawi
  6. 6. Summary  Management is the use of people and resources to accomplish organizational objectives. Managers can come in many forms and serve a variety of functions. The roles and responsibilities of what a manager does can differ from organization to organization, but they are typically categorized into three levels: top-level management, middle-level management, and lower-level management.  Top-level management are executives such as a CEO, CFO, President and Vice President. These top managers are responsible for setting the overall direction of a company and making sure that major organizational objectives are achieved.  Middle-level managers are the head of major departments and their specialized units; they hold titles such as director, assistant director, regional director, division manger, dean, branch manager, and site manager. They spend most of their time developing and implementing strategic action plans needed to achieve the organizational goals set by top management.  Low-level managers work most closely with the greater workforce to ensure that individual employees are meeting their performance goals in a way that aligns with the organizational goals.6 02/03/2013 Ashraf Alsinglawi
  7. 7. Managerial Skills: How Good Managers Promote Productivity  Managerial Skill Sets: are what the manager uses to assist the organization in accomplishing its goals. Specifically, a manager will make use of his or her own abilities, knowledge base, experiences, and perspectives to increase the productivity of those with whom they manage.  The toolbox for what a manager needs in order to perform their job effectively, typically, fall into one of three categories:  technical skills, human skills, and conceptual skills.7 02/03/2013 Ashraf Alsinglawi
  8. 8. Managerial Skills: How Good Managers Promote Productivity  Technical Skills: are those skills needed to accomplish a specific task. It is the how to skill set that allows a manager to complete his or her job.  These skills are the combination of formal education, training, and on-the-job experience.  Most employees expect their managers to have a technical skill set above their own so that, when needed, an employee can come to their manager to find out how to do something specific to their individual job.8 02/03/2013 Ashraf Alsinglawi
  9. 9. Managerial Skills: How Good Managers Promote Productivity  Human Skills: are what a manager will use to work with his or her employees.  Managers with good human skills understand their role inside the manager/employee relationship and how important things, like trust, cohesion, fairness, empathy, and good will, are to the overall success of the organization.  Human skills help the manager to communicate, lead, and motivate an employee to work towards a higher level of productivity.9 02/03/2013 Ashraf Alsinglawi
  10. 10. Managerial Skills: How Good Managers Promote Productivity  Conceptual Skills: The level of analytical ability to envision both the parts and its sum.  Essentially, a managers conceptual skills allow him or her to solve problems in a strategic and calculated fashion.  A manager with good conceptual skills can look at a problem, break it down into manageable pieces, consider a variety of possible solutions, all before putting it back together again in a more effective and efficient manner.10 02/03/2013 Ashraf Alsinglawi
  11. 11. Summary  Managerial skills are necessary for a manager to perform their job successfully. There are three different types of managerial skills, which include technical skills, human skills, and conceptual skills.  Technical skills are the specific skill set used to perform a particular job, such as writing a computer program, developing a budget, or analyzing sales trends. These skills are most important for low-level managers because of how closely they work with employees performing the actual job functions. Human skills include the ability for managers to work with, motivate, encourage, empathize, and communicate with their employees. These skills are important for all levels of management. Conceptual skills are the managers ability to think analytically about the organization and how to most effectively accomplish its goals. These skills become increasingly more important the higher the management level.11 02/03/2013 Ashraf Alsinglawi
  12. 12. Henry Mintzberg’s Managerial Roles  At any given moment a manager might have to be a coach, a strategic planner, a liaison, a cheerleader, a conflict manager, a realist, a problem-solver, an organizer, an optimist, a trainer and a decision-maker.  A manager must understand all of his or her roles and how to perform them effectively. This means that a manager must have a global understanding of all business functions, organizational goals, his or her level of accountability and the appropriate way to serve both internal and external clients of the organization.  Henry Mintzberg was able to classify these roles into three categories, including interpersonal, informational and decisional roles.12 02/03/2013 Ashraf Alsinglawi
  13. 13. Henry Mintzberg’s Managerial Roles  Interpersonal Roles: These roles involve the behaviors associated with human interaction that allow a manager to interact with his or her employees for the purpose of achieving organizational goals.  Figurehead; certain social, ceremonial and legal responsibilities that his employees expect him to fulfill. (a source of inspiration and authority to his employees.)  Leader; requires him to direct and manage the performance of his employees. He will spend time communicating performance goals, training and mentoring employees, supporting employee efforts, supplying resources, evaluating employee performance and motivating employees toward a higher level of productivity.  Liaison; communicates with internal and external members of the organization. This networking activity is a critical step in reaching organizational goals, especially those concerned with customers.13 02/03/2013 Ashraf Alsinglawi
  14. 14. Henry Mintzberg’s Managerial Roles  Informational Roles: Include those roles in which a manager must generate and share knowledge to successfully achieve organizational goals.  Monitor; involves the task of researching, locating and choosing useful information. This also includes monitoring the performance of employees and their level of productivity.  Disseminator; takes the information he gathered as a monitor and forward it on to the appropriate individuals.  Spokesperson; communicates information about the organization to outside parties.14 02/03/2013 Ashraf Alsinglawi
  15. 15. Henry Mintzberg’s Managerial Roles  Decisional Roles: All of these roles involve the process of using information to make decisions.  Entrepreneur; focus on process improvement. He looks for ways to improve productivity and efficiency within his organization and directs the change process from development to implementation.  Disturbance-handler; serves as a conflict manager. He spends time taking corrective action during times of dispute to remove any barriers toward organizational success.  Resource-allocator; Taking the time to plan, dispense and monitor resources to ensure that his employees continue to be productive.  Negotiator; acts as a representative for the team, department or organization during times of negotiation, whereby he looks out for the best interests of the party he represents.15 02/03/2013 Ashraf Alsinglawi
  16. 16. Henry Mintzberg’s Managerial Roles  Mintzbergs Managerial Roles Today:  Managers of all levels perform the roles described by Mintzberg on a daily basis at organizations worldwide.  Many managers assess their own behaviors against those described by Mintzberg to become more self-aware of how they can improve their managerial practices.16 02/03/2013 Ashraf Alsinglawi
  17. 17. Summary  There are many roles a manager has within an organization. Henry Mintzberg described ten specific managerial roles most commonly seen within organizations. Mintzberg classified the roles into three categories: interpersonal roles, or those roles associated with human interaction; informational roles, or those roles associated with sharing information and decisional roles, or those roles involved in decision-making. Interpersonal roles include the figurehead, leader and liaison. Informational roles include the monitor, disseminator and spokesperson. Decisional roles include the entrepreneur,disturbance- handler, resource-allocator and negotiator.17 02/03/2013 Ashraf Alsinglawi
  18. 18. Four Functions of Management: Planning, Organizing, Leading & Controlling  Planning: In this step the manager will create a detailed action plan aimed at some organizational goal.  Planning is an ongoing step and can be highly specialized based on organizational goals, division goals, departmental goals, and team goals. It is up to the manager to recognize which goals need to be planned within his or her individual area.18 02/03/2013 Ashraf Alsinglawi
  19. 19. Four Functions of Management: Planning, Organizing, Leading & Controlling  Organizing: to determine how manager will distribute resources and organize his employees according to the plan.  He will need to identify different roles and ensure that he assigns the right amount of employees to carry out his plan. He will also need to delegate authority, assign work, and provide direction so that his team can work towards higher achievements without having barriers in their way.19 02/03/2013 Ashraf Alsinglawi
  20. 20. Four Functions of Management: Planning, Organizing, Leading & Controlling  Leading: manager spends time connecting with his employees on an interpersonal level.  It involves communicating, motivating, inspiring, and encouraging employees towards a higher level of productivity.  Not all managers are leaders. An employee will follow the directions of a manager because they have to, but an employee will voluntarily follow the directions of a leader because they believe in who he or she is as a person, what he or she stands for, and for the manner in which they are inspired by the leader.20 02/03/2013 Ashraf Alsinglawi
  21. 21. Four Functions of Management: Planning, Organizing, Leading & Controlling  Controlling: the manager evaluates the results against the goals.  If a goal is not being met, the manager must also take any necessary corrective actions to continue to work towards that goal.  Because the control process also includes setting performance standards for employees and continuously evaluating their job performances, Manager will speak with each of his team individually to review their performances.21 02/03/2013 Ashraf Alsinglawi
  22. 22. Four Functions of Management: Planning, Organizing, Leading & Controlling  The Fifth Function: Staffing is the task of evaluating, recruiting, selecting, training, and placing appropriate individuals into defined job roles.  A manager must spend time evaluating his or her workforce needs, discovering where employees need to be added, trained, or removed, and then making those changes so that the organization can continue business as usual.22 02/03/2013 Ashraf Alsinglawi
  23. 23. Summary  There are four functions of management that span across all industries. They include: planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. You should think about the four functions as a process, where each step builds on the others. Managers must first plan, then organize according to that plan, lead others to work towards the plan, and finally evaluate the effectiveness of the plan.  Planning is the first step where by a manager creates a detailed action plan aimed at some organizational goal. Organizing is the second step, which involves the manager determining how to distribute resources and arrange employees according to the plan. Leading is the third step that is accomplished by communicating, motivating, inspiring, and encouraging employees towards a higher level of productivity. Controlling is the final function of management in which the manager, once a plan has been carried out, evaluates the results against the goals. If a goal is not being met, the manager must also take any necessary corrective action needed to continue to work towards that goal. Some have added a fifth function for managers known as staffing. Staffing is the task of evaluating, recruiting, selecting, training, and placing appropriate individuals into defined job roles.23 02/03/2013 Ashraf Alsinglawi
  24. 24. Hearing is a gift, Listening is a skill alsinglawi@gmail.com 009627950400324 02/03/2013 Ashraf Alsinglawi

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