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Boat

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  • 1. Boat Diver Specialty Course Instructor Outline Product No. 70229 (Rev. 05/05) Version 1.06
  • 2. Legend Note to instructors: Points for the instructor to consider that give additional qualifying information about con- ducting the course. Not intended to be read to students. Note to students: Required information. Read to students as printed. Important information. Read to students. By the end of this session, you will be able to: Objectives always precede individual Academic • Objective Topics and open water dives. • Objective • Objective PADI® Boat Diver Specialty Course Instructor Outline © International PADI, Inc. 1990-2005 All rights reserved, including the right of reproduction in whole or in part in any form. Published by International PADI Inc. 30151 Tomas St. Rancho Santa Margarita, CA 92688 Printed in U.S.A. Product Number 70229 (Rev. 5/05) Version 1.06 Technical Development: PADI Training and Education Department Instructional Design: Bob Wohlers Technical Writing: Bob Wohlers Consultation and Review: Mal Fousek Jeff Myers Drew Richardson Karl Shreeves Julie Taylor Sanders C.K. Stewart Specialty Course Instructor Outline ii
  • 3. Please read this first. Qualifying To Teach PADI Specialty Diver Courses To apply for a Specialty Instructor rating, an individual must be certified as a PADI Underwater Instructor or higher. There are two ways to qualify to teach PADI Specialty Diver courses: 1) Attend a Specialty Instructor Training Course conducted by PADI Course Directors, or 2) apply directly to PADI. Specialty Instructor Training Course attendance is highly recommended and encouraged. These courses provide hands-on training, technique demonstra- tions, course marketing information, current PADI Standards information and, when applicable, instructor-level open water training. Application made directly to PADI requires either: 1) use of a PADI standard- ized Specialty Course Instructor Outline (this document), or 2) the submis- sion of a self-generated specialty course outline for review. To speed outline approval, reduce liability exposure and ensure educational validity of your specialty courses, it is highly recommended that PADI standardized Specialty Course Instructor Outlines be used for courses they have been developed for. The Specialty Course Instructor Application is to be used whether attending a Specialty Instructor Training Course or applying directly to PADI. Important Note: Prior to promoting or teaching a PADI Specialty Diver course, written confirmation of instructor certification in that specialty must first be received from PADI. For more information on certification as a PADI Specialty Instructor, please refer to the “General Standards and Procedures” section of the PADI Instruc- tor Manual. If you still have questions after reading this section, call your PADI Office. Boat Diver iii
  • 4. COURSE STANDARDS AND OVERVIEW This course is designed to be an introduction to boat diving and to help the student diver develop the skills, knowledge and techniques necessary for boat diving. Prerequisites To qualify for the Boat Diver course, an individual must: 1. Be certified as a PADI Open Water Diver, Junior Open Water Diver or have a qualifying certification from another training organization. 2. Be 10 years of age or older. The Boat Dive from the PADI Adventures in Diving program may be counted toward the certification requirements for this specialty at the discretion of the instructor conducting the specialty course. Instructor Supervision Boat Diver courses may be conducted by a Teaching status PADI Underwater Instructor (or PADI Instructor with a higher rating) who has been certified as a PADI Boat Diving Instructor. The maximum student diver-to-instructor ratio for open water training dives is eight students per instructor (8:1). For dives that include 10-11 year olds, direct supervision is required at a maximum ratio of 4:1. No more than two of the four divers may be age 10 or 11. Considerations for Open Water Training The Boat Diver course is to include two open water training dives, which may be conducted in one day. Both open water training dives must be conducted from a boat. It is recommended, but not required, that divers enrolled in the course be exposed to the techniques and procedures for diving from different types of boats (inflatable boats, hard-hulled day boats, cabin cruisers, live- aboards, sailboats, etc.). Training dives may be conducted at night for divers who have completed the Night Adventure Dive or the first dive of the PADI Night Diver specialty course, or have qualifying night diving experi- ence. After the training dives, student divers are required to log their dives in their personal log books. Specialty Course Instructor Outline iv
  • 5. COURSE OVERVIEW This course covers the knowledge and techniques of boat diving. The mini- mum number of recommended hours is 12, with time being equally divided between knowledge development and actual water-training sessions. To con- duct a Boat Diver course, the following is to be included: 1. The planning, organization, procedures, techniques, problems and hazards of boat diving. 2. Proper boat diving etiquette -- storage of personal equipment, personal conduct and considerations for care of the boat. 3. Basic, common boat terminology. 4. Specific boat diving laws and/or ordinances. 5. Local boat diving laws and/or ordinances. 6. Overview of emergency/safety equipment needed on-board private diving vessels. When available and convenient, student divers interested in seamanship and small boat handling should be directed to specialized courses offered in this subject area (like those offered by national Coast Guard units, power squad- rons, private schools, colleges/universities, etc.). However, basic seamanship and small boat handling skills may be included in the course at the discretion of the instructor. CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES The certifying instructor obtains a Boat Diver certification by submitting a completed, signed PIC to the appropriate PADI Office. The instructor who conducts the student’s final open water training session is to be the certifying instructor. The instructor certifying the student must ensure that all certification requirements have been met. KEY STANDARDS Prerequisite Certification: PADI Open Water Diver, Junior Open Water Diver or qualifying certification Minimum Age: 10 Recommended Course Hours: 12 Minimum Open Water Training: 2 dives Student-to-Instructor Ratio: 8:1* Minimum Instructor Rating: Boat Diver Specialty Instructor *For dives that include 10-11 year olds, direct supervision is required at a maximum ratio of 4:1. No more than two of the four divers may be age 10 or 11. Boat Diver v
  • 6. Introductory Information Boat Diver Specialty Course Instructor Outline Heading IV, in the outline “Academic Topics,” provides information that should be presented to students prior to boarding the diving vessel used during the course. At the discretion of the instructor, the topics in this section may be modularized (divided into several academic presentation sessions). Heading V, in the outline “General Open water Considerations,” provides specific information about conducting the open water dives in the course. Although open water teaching and organizational techniques are left to the instructor, read this information carefully prior to taking students in open water. Heading VII, in the outline “Basic Seamanship and Small Boat Handling,” is an optional module that may be presented to students enrolled in the course. The module is an overview of the topic and completion of the module’s objec- tives does not indicate a complete knowledge of operating or handling any size/type dive boat. The boat dive from the PADI Adventures in Diving program may be counted toward Dive One of this specialty, at the discretion of the instructor. Similarly, Dive One of this specialty may be counted toward the Elective Boat Dive in the PADI Adventures in Diving program. Specialty Course Instructor Outline vi
  • 7. I. Course Overview The purpose of the PADI Boat Diver Specialty course is to familiarize divers with the skills, knowledge, planning, organization, procedures, techniques, problems, hazards and enjoyment of diving from a boat. The Boat Diver Specialty course is intended to serve as a safe, super- vised introduction to boat diving. Training should emphasize fun and safety. The goals of PADI Boat Diver training are: A. To develop the student’s knowledge of dive boats — proper boat diving etiquette, personal conduct, basic dive boat terminology, local boat diving laws and/or ordinances. B. To develop the student’s ability to perform important boat diving skills — boat diving entries/exits, use of emergency/safety equip- ment and, in some situations, basic boating skills. C. To enable the student to plan, organize and conduct safe dives from a boat. This course is designed to be flexible so it may be conducted on boats of all types and sizes — 1) inflatables; 2) hard-hull day boats; 3) cabin cruisers; and 4) live-aboard dive boats. II. Boat Diver Course Requirements A. Prerequisite certification: PADI Open Water Diver, Junior Open Water Diver or have a qualifying certification from another training organization. The instructor is to ensure that the individual can perform the skills required of a PADI Open Water Diver. B. Minimum age requirement: 10 years. C. Maximum student-to-instructor ratio: 8:1, to certified assistant 4:1. For dives that include 10-11 year olds, direct supervision is required at a maxi- mum ratio of 4:1. No more than two of the four divers may be age 10 or 11. D. The Elective Boat Dive from the PADI Adventures in Diving pro- gram may be counted toward the certification requirements for this specialty at the discretion of the instructor conducting the specialty course. E. Confined water training may be added at the discretion of the instructor conducting the specialty course. As a preassessment before the course begins, a confined-water session may include a scuba-skills review. The PADI Skills Evaluation or Scuba Review Program is an excellent means of accomplishing this requirement. Boat Diver 1
  • 8. F. Dive data: 1. Two scuba dives. 2. The maximum depth for training open water divers during this course is 18 metres/60 feet. For 12-14 year olds, Adventure Dive maximum depth is 18 metres/60 feet or 21 metres/70 feet if they have taken the Adventure Deep Dive. For 10-11 year olds, the maximum depth is 12 metres/40 feet. III. Student and Instructor Equipment Requirements A. Student equipment 1. All personal standard diving equipment including: a. Mask, snorkel and fins b. Exposure suit and exposure suit accessories as appropriate for local diving environment. c. Weight system d. Tank and regulator system with submersible pressure gauge e. Alternate air source suitable for sharing air with other divers f. BCD with low-pressure inflator g. Complete instrumentation, including a means to monitor depth, time and direction Depth and time monitoring may be accomplished through use of electronic dive computers, although students should be encouraged to carry additional depth and time monitoring instrumentation as backup in case of computer failure. h. Recreational Dive Planner (Table or Wheel) i. Diving tool or knife capable of cutting line j. Slate with pencil k. Whistle or other surface signaling device l. Log book m. Dive bag 2. Specialty equipment/supplies — recommended a. Spare parts kit Specialty Course Instructor Outline 2
  • 9. B. Instructor equipment 1. All personal standard and specialty equipment required/rec- ommended of students. 2. Recommended safety equipment (unless supplied by char- tered boat operation): a. First aid supplies/equipment. Recommended: first aid kit, Pocket Mask and oxygen. b. Small boat/surfboard for rapid surface transport (when diving from larger vessels). 3. Recommended specialty instructor equipment (unless sup- plied by chartered boat operation): a. Divers down flag (unless supplied by boat) b. VHF radio c. Floats, lines and anchors as needed 4. PADI materials that may be used to teach this course. a. General materials and teaching aids: • Log book (Adventure Log recommended) • PADI Instructor Manual • Student Record File b. PADI reference materials: • PADI Adventures in Diving Manual • The Encyclopedia of Recreational Diving c. Recognition materials: • PIC envelopes • Specialty Diver wall certificates • Boat Diver specialty chevrons IV. Academic Topics The following is an actual presentation outline. Directions to, or com- ments for, the instructor are enclosed in [brackets]. A. Introductions, course overview and welcome to the course 1. Staff introductions a. [Introduce yourself and assistants] b. [Have students introduce themselves and explain why they’re interested in boat diving — break the ice and encourage a relaxed atmosphere.] 2. Course goals a. The goals of this course are: • To develop your practical knowledge of boat diving. Boat Diver 3
  • 10. • To increase your diving skills. • To enable you to plan, organize and make dives from boats. • Provide you with additional supervised experience. • To encourage you to participate in other PADI Continu- ing Education Courses. 3. Course overview a. Classroom presentations. [Academic information may also be given on boats or on shore. If classroom presentations are used to teach academic information, give the times, dates and locations.] There will be _______ (number) classroom presentations during the course. b. Open water training dives. There will be two open water training dives during this course. • On each dive, you will practice simple boat diving tech- niques. • Each dive is designed to maximize your fun and enjoy- ment while you are professionally supervised by your PADI Instructor (and certified assistants). 4. Certification a. Upon successful completion of the course, the PADI Boat Diver Specialty certification card is awarded. b. Certification recognizes that you: • Have been trained to plan, organize, conduct and log open water dives from a boat, in conditions generally comparable to, or better than, those you were trained in. • May apply for the rating of Master Scuba Diver if you are a PADI Advanced Open Water Diver (or have a qualifying certification from another organization) and a PADI Rescue Diver (or have a qualifying certification from another organization) with certification in four other PADI Specialty ratings. 5. Class requirements a. Cost of course [Be sure to explain all course costs] b. Equipment needs c. Materials needed for the course d. Attendance requirements 6. Administration a. Complete paperwork — Enrollment, Standard Safe Diving Practices Statement of Understanding, PADI Medical State- ment, Liability Release and Assumption of Risk. [The PADI Student Record File contains all of these forms. Using it makes completing course paperwork easy and convenient.] Specialty Course Instructor Outline 4
  • 11. B. Why dive from boats? Learning Objectives. By the end of this session, you will be able to: • List five reasons for learning how to boat dive. 1. Opportunities to dive in areas you could not otherwise reach 2. Allows you to seek out the calmest and clearest waters 3. Typically easier than shore diving a. Easy entries b. Reduced need for long surface and underwater swims. c. Easy exits 4. Less wear and tear on equipment (compared to most types of shore diving). 5. Social interaction a. Making new friends b. Learning from other divers C. Common boat terminology Learning Objectives. By the end of this session, you will be able to: • Locate a boat’s bow, stern, starboard side and port side. • Locate a boat’s windward and leeward sides. • Locate the following (specific and appropriate to the type of dive boat being used during the course): equipment storage area(s), head(s), shower(s), bunks (staterooms), wheelhouse (bridge), transom, rail, galley and diving entry/exit area. 1. Nautical terms to help you orient yourself on board a boat. a. Bow — front end, forward part of a boat • Forward — towards the bow of the boat b. Stern — back end, rear part of a boat • Astern — towards the rear of the boat • Aft — rearward; literally — after the decks (as in go aft). c. Starboard side — right side of a boat d. Port side — left side of a boat • Remembering Port from Starboard. Always think of a boat that just left port (as in leaving a harbor). e. Windward side (or side to weather) — that side of a boat upon which the wind is blowing f. Leeward side — that side of a boat away from the wind direction Boat Diver 5
  • 12. g. Amidships — double meaning; an object or area midway between the boat’s sides or something midway between the bow and the stern. h. Aloft — overhead in the rigging i. Below — below the deck j. Abovedeck — means on deck 2. Identifying an area on a boat by its nautical term a. Head — a boat’s toilet/restroom facility. [If the boat used during the course has a head, you may wish to review its proper use.] b. Galley — a boat’s kitchen c. Bridge — a raised transverse platform on a boat from which the boat is navigated. d. Wheelhouse (or pilothouse) — a deckhouse for the boat’s helmsman (pilot), containing the steering wheel, compass and navigating equipment. e. Transom — the planking forming the stern of a square- ended boat. On small vessels (such as an inflatable), the transom is the stern area on which an outboard motor is attached. f. Rail — guard/barrier at outer edge of a ship’s deck. • Gunwale — top rail of the boat. The tops of the pon- toons on an inflatable. 3. Other possible locations on board a boat a. Tank racks b. Spear gun bins c. Bunks/staterooms d. Diving entry/exit area D. Categories of dive boats Learning Objectives. By the end of this session, you will be able to: • State three features typically required of a good dive boat. • Identify a dive boat by placing it in one of the four general categories — inflatables, hard-hull day boats, cabin cruisers, and live-aboards. 1. Three features typically required of a good dive boat a. Ample deck space — very important for suiting up and storage of equipment. Small boats with ample deck space may be better than larger, more luxurious vessels without deck space. Specialty Course Instructor Outline 6
  • 13. b. Stability — dive boats must be stable platforms c. Power — needed to haul people and lots of equipment to a destination 2. Categories of dive boats The following categories of dive boats are loose subdivisions. Some types of dive boats may not fit “neatly” into any one category. Categories are assigned for the purpose of defining the different procedures and techniques used when diving from one of these types of vessels. a. Inflatables • From approximately 3 metres/10 feet to over 5 metres/16 feet long. • Typically, two air-filled side tubes which meet at the bow. May have flexible or rigid hull, solid or inflatable keel, soft or hard floorboard. Has a solid transom on which an outboard motor is typically placed. • Side tubes typically subdivided into independent com- partments — minimizes buoyancy loss in the event of a puncture or tear. b. Hard-hull day boats • From approximately 5 metres/16 feet to over 6 metres/20 feet. • Boats in this category could include: resort pontoon flat-tops, runabouts, utility boats, small sailboats, and skiffs. • Those hard-hulled day boats designed specifically for diving or fishing are best — lots of deck space. Touring/skiing hard-hulled day boats typically have minimal deck space. c. Cabin cruisers • From approximately 5 metres/20 feet to over 9 metres/28 feet (in the US, 9 metres/28 feet is the larg- est size that may be trailered). • The term cruiser typically indicates a type of boat with at least minimum accommodations and facilities for overnight trips. • Boats in this category could include: all types of cabin cruisers, medium-sized sailboats, and yachts. Some types of small dive charter boats fall into this category (six to ten divers). Boat Diver 7
  • 14. • The best cabin cruisers for diving are those with lots of deck space. d. Live-aboards • From approximately 9 metres/30 feet to over several hundreds of metres/feet. • In this category can be found: converted fishing ves- sels, large charter-type dive boats (sail or power; up to 50+ divers), luxurious yachts, and even cruise ships (may accommodate hundreds of divers). • Individuals diving from the larger live-aboards may find themselves actually diving from inflatables or small, hard-hull day boats. Therefore, knowing how to dive from both types of boats may be helpful. E. Emergency equipment for boat diving Learning Objectives. By the end of this session, you will be able to: • List the basic emergency equipment typically found on the type of dive boat(s) used during the course. • Locate the basic emergency equipment on the boat(s) used during the course. You need only cover the emergency/safety equipment typically found on the type of dive boat(s) used during your course. Consequently, you need not cover all of the information presented in this section. 1. Life preservers (personal flotation devices), buoyant cushions, life rings and ring buoys. a. Local regulations — number and type required: ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ b. Where found on board c. Review lifejacket usage. [Optional exercise. 2. Fire extinguishers a. Local regulations — number and type required: ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ b. Where found on board c. Review fire extinguisher usage. [Optional exercise.] Specialty Course Instructor Outline 8
  • 15. 3. Sound signaling devices a. Whistles and other surface signaling devices b. Bells 4. Visual distress signals a. Local regulations — number and type required: ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ b. Where found on board c. Review device usage [Optional exercise] 5. Bilge pump or bailer a. Where found on board b. Review usage 6. First aid kits a. Contents of a personal first aid kit — those brought on board by divers. [Reference PADI Rescue Diver Manual for complete information on first aid kits.] • Type of container — sealed, moisture proof plastic box is best (no metal parts or cardboard). • Basic first aid supplies — bandages, dressings, tapes, antiseptic ointments, and sunburn lotions/sprays. • Basic first aid instruments — scissors, tweezers, Pocket Mask, and thermometer. • Personal medications and supplies b. On-board first aid kit (those belonging to the boat) [Review contents on on-board first aid kit.] Encourage all enrolled boat divers to complete a standard first aid course. Emergency First Response is highly recommended for boaters since it is a combination course in CPR and emergency care. 7. Oxygen equipment for boat diving. [Reference PADI Rescue Diver Manual for complete information on oxygen equipment — types, usage, etc.] a. Highly recommended for every dive boat b. Recommended type: demand-valve. Delivers 100 percent oxygen to patient. c. Local regulations, use of oxygen: ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ Boat Diver 9
  • 16. d. Where found on board e. Review basic usage of oxygen device. [Optional exercise.] 8. Use of marine radios for emergency purposes a. Local usage — emergency frequency(ies) specific to type of radio(s) being used: ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ b. Where found on board c. Review radio usage [Optional exercise] F. Seasickness Learning Objectives. By the end of this session, you will be able to: • State nine ways to help avoid getting seasick while boat diving. • Explain what to do if the motion of a boat causes seasickness. 1. How to combat seasickness: a. Take a seasickness medication. If you plan to use seasick- ness medication: • Carefully read all warnings associated with the medi- cation and follow printed directions. • Generally, take medication prior to boarding. b. Avoid greasy foods prior to boarding c. Stay in the fresh air on deck. d. Stand in the center of the boat, concentrating on a station- ary object on the horizon. e. Stay busy while underway, but avoid intricate tasks (pre- paring underwater photo equipment, etc.). f. Be prepared to enter the water soon after arrival at the dive site. However, if feeling very ill — do not dive. g. If the trip is overnight, select a bunk as near the middle of the boat as possible. h. Avoid breathing engine fumes from the boat. i. Avoid using the heads during rough weather. 2. If you do get sick a. Don’t use the boat’s head b. Use the leeward (downwind) boat rail c. Be careful being on the deck alone (especially at night while the boat is underway in rough seas). Get someone to go with you. Specialty Course Instructor Outline 10
  • 17. d. After getting sick, try to drink some water to avoid getting dehydrated. G. Pre-boarding procedures Learning Objectives. By the end of this session, you will be able to: • Prepare dive equipment prior to boarding for ease of use while boat diving. • Assemble an appropriate spare parts and tool kit for the type of boat diving being done. • Prepare yourself both mentally and physically prior to boarding a boat for diving. • Use the PADI Boat Diving Information Sheet to help organize boat diving excursions. 1. Preparing your diving equipment a. Inspect your equipment carefully. b. Use an equipment check-off list. Keeps you from forget- ting needed equipment. [Refer students to the PADI Open Water Equipment Checklist found in the appendix of most PADI diver manuals.] c. Clearly mark all equipment. On a crowded dive boat, equipment can be easily misplaced — besides, a lot of equipment looks similar. d. Fill tank(s) in advance. e. Carefully pack all dive equipment (except tank, weight belt and some specialty items) in a dive bag. Use separate bag(s) for personal belongings, food, etc. Don’t forget log book, certification card and legal documents (fishing license, visas, passports, etc.). 2. Assembling a spare parts and tool kit for boat diving. a. Type of container — fishing tacklebox works great. b. Parts: • O-rings • Mask/fin straps • Exposure suit repair items • Other:____________________________ __________________________________ c. Tools: [This mainly depends on the type of boat being used for the course or the type of boat the student will use upon certification. Customize this section appropriately.] • __________________________________ • __________________________________ Boat Diver 11
  • 18. • __________________________________ • __________________________________ • __________________________________ • __________________________________ 3. Preparing your body and mind a. Refrain from alcoholic beverages the night before, but do drink plenty of fluids (water, juices, etc.). b. Get plenty of sleep. c. If necessary, take seasickness medication the night before — follow printed directions. d. Don’t forget to eat a balanced meal. e. If needed, write down the following information: • Name of boat • Directions • Destination(s) • Charter fees (if any) • Extra charges (food, air, etc.) 4. Use of the PADI Boat Diving Information Sheet. [See Appendix of most PADI diver manuals. If appropriate, review sheet with students — explain utility.] H. Boarding procedures Learning Objectives. By the end of this session, you will be able to: • Describe the boarding procedure for the type of dive boat(s) being used during the course. The following information deals primarily with the boarding procedures for charter-type dive boats. Regardless of the type of dive boat used during the course, it is highly recommended that the following information be presented due to its almost universal utility. 1. Plan to board the boat or check in at least a half an hour prior to departure. 2. Once on board, ask or listen to directions as to where and how to stow diving equipment. 3. Ask or listen to directions as to where to stow personal items — those you intend to keep dry. a. Anything left on the open deck will probably get wet. Specialty Course Instructor Outline 12
  • 19. b. On small boats, you may want to leave items that need to stay dry at home, in a car, on shore, etc. 4. If necessary, sign in and place your name on your tank. 5. If a predeparture briefing is conducted, attend and listen care- fully. 6. Specific boarding procedures for the type of boat(s) used during the course: __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ I. Predive procedures Learning Objectives. By the end of this session, you will be able to: • Identify the four parts of a typical area orientation briefing. • Explain how to suit up prior to the dive, specific to the type of dive boat(s) being used during the course and the environmental conditions encountered. • Perform no decompression calculations using the RDP. You need only cover those predive procedures specific and appropriate to the type of dive boat(s) used during your course. 1. Listening to predive briefings. a. When predive briefings are given, always listen carefully. Predive briefings help ensure safe, problem-free boat dives. b. Focus your attention on the divemaster or crew member — stop all other activity. c. If after the briefing, you haven’t heard specific information or if you have a question, ask for input. 2. The four parts of a typical area orientation briefing. [Taken from the PADI Area Orientation Guidelines — Divemaster Slate No. 1. The information on this slate is a template for the type of briefing typically delivered prior to boat dives. By knowing the contents of a proper area orientation, the students can intelligently ask questions if they ever hear an incomplete boat dive briefing.] Boat Diver 13
  • 20. a. Facilities orientation • Restroom/showers, food concession • Where to suit up • Off-limits areas b. General characteristics • Bottom type and topography • Depth range • Speed and direction of current (if any) • Areas to avoid • Interesting and helpful facts about the site • Game regulations and hazardous marine life • Entry/exit information (technique and location) • Suggested dive plan c. Buddy team considerations • Buddy-team selection • Advise inexperienced divers to pair with experienced divers. • Review buddy team procedures. d. Communication, emergency procedures and general safety rules. • Review hand signals • All divers to signal “O.K.” upon surfacing • When to exit • What to do in the event of an emergency • The role of supervisory personnel • Review accounting, recall and out-of-air procedures • Dive site rating (novice, experienced, advanced) 3. Suiting up while boat diving a. Inflatables and small hard-hull day boats • If deck space on the inflatable is at a premium, you may want to assemble your tank, BCD and regulator prior to leaving the dock/shore. • Depending on inflatable size, you might also consider putting your exposure suit on prior to leaving dock/ shore (some inflatables have wet rides). • Upon arrival at dive site, you might consider putting the tanks, BCDs and regulators overboard — attached to a line. This opens deck space for final suiting. [Explain how this will be done during the course.] • As always, assist your buddy when needed. Specialty Course Instructor Outline 14
  • 21. • Conduct safety drill — BWRAF • Rinse mask • Other:______________________________ • Other:______________________________ • Other:______________________________ b. Cabin cruisers and live-aboards • Consolidate diving equipment in one area. • Assemble tank, BCD and regulator. • Don exposure suit (if needed) and place dry clothes below (bunk, galley, any dry area). • Have buddy assist with tank donning — don’t don tank over the head. May cause injury. • Conduct safety drill — BWRAF • Fins are donned directly adjacent to the entry area — walking on boat decks with fins is a good way to trip and fall. • Rinse mask and partially inflate BCD • Other:_________________________________ • Other:_________________________________ • Other:_________________________________ 4. Prior to every boat dive, perform all appropriate RDP calculations based on the specific dive site depth infor- mation. 5. When diving from noncharter, private boats: a. Leave personnel on board to tend the boat. Make sure they are capable of operating the boat in case the anchor breaks free or divers need assistance. b. Fly the appropriate divers down flag for the local area. The appropriate flag for this local area is: ______________________________________________ Boat Diver 15
  • 22. J. Dive procedures You need only cover those dive procedures specific to the type of dive boat(s) used during your course. Learning Objectives. By the end of this session, you will be able to: • Explain how to make a proper entry, specific to the type of dive boat(s) being used during the course and the environmental condi- tions encountered • State the specific descent procedure to be used on the dives in the course. • Identify the direction divers should typically head when diving from a boat at anchor. • Identify the general area in which individuals should dive when a boat is at anchor near a shoreline. • State the use of trip lines, gear lines, tag lines, and current lines. • Explain how to make a proper exit, specific to the type of dive boat(s) being used during the course and the environmental conditions encountered. 1. Boat diving entries a. General • If necessary, check out with divemaster/boat crew. • Make sure entry area is clear. • Partially inflate your BCD prior to entry — if tank and BCD are donned on the boat. • Use your regulator during the entry. If tank and BCD are donned in the water, use your snorkel. • Hold mask firmly during entry. • Have accessories (cameras, etc.) handed to you in the water. • If appropriate, move away from boat once in the water (so others may enter and because anchored boats swing in the water). • Other:______________________________ • Other:______________________________ b. Types of entries from inflatables and small hard-hull day boats: • Backward roll • Sitting entry — slide-in off gunwale Specialty Course Instructor Outline 16
  • 23. • Other:______________________________ • Other:______________________________ c. Types of entries from cabin cruisers and live-aboards: • Feet first — giant stride • Sitting entry — slide in off back swim step, side ladder platform, etc. • Other:______________________________ • Other:______________________________ d. The type of entry(ies) we will make during the dives in this course are: • _______________________________________ • _______________________________________ 2. Boat diving descents a. General • Prior to descent, orient yourself to the boat and/or shoreline — using natural navigation or compass techniques. Also, note air pressure, time and location of buddy. • When possible, use a line during your descent — for comfort and orientation. • If drift diving, follow directions given by divemaster or inwater dive supervisor. • If you descend down a line, use it as a guide only — do not use anchored line to pull yourself down. This may lift anchor off the bottom on some boats. • Watch depth, time and air pressure during all descents. b. Anchor line descent • Be cautious of vertical boat movement due to surface swells. Severe jerking motions may cause discomfort and even injury. • Be cautious of the boat needing to re-anchor — release and swim away from the anchor line if it suddenly begins to come up. • Remember that the anchor line is typically curved and does not hang straight down. c. Trip line descent • Trip line is connected to anchor with a buoy at the surface — separate from the anchor line. • Typically hangs much more vertical than anchor line. d. Free descent — descent without a line Boat Diver 17
  • 24. • Be cautious of disorientation if you find yourself in mid water — when you cannot see the surface or bottom. • Be sensitive to your buddy’s location (or location of the group while drift diving). • Watch your rate of descent. e. The type of descent(s) we will make during the dives in this course are: •______________________________________ •______________________________________ 3. Diving from an anchored boat a. For comfort, navigate during the dive to end your dive at or near the boat. b. Dive against the current so it can be used to assist you in returning to the boat at the end of the dive. c. If so directed, dive between the shoreline and the boat. This procedure will typically keep you away from off- shore boat traffic. d. Avoid long excursions from the boat. Dive boats generally anchor over the best area. 4. Diving from an unanchored boat while drift diving. [If your PADI Boat Diver Specialty course is conducted from an unan- chored boat while drift diving, explain the drift diving pro- cedures used in your area at this time. If necessary, reference the PADI Drift Diver Specialty Course Instructor Outline for procedural recommendations.] 5. Use of special lines during some types of boat diving. a. Gear lines • These lines are generally used on smaller dive boats. They hang off of the sides or the transom. • Used to attach equipment to — tanks with BCDs and regulators, cameras, etc. • On inflatables, may be the lines permanently attached to the sides of the boat. b. Tag lines • These lines may be used on all sized boats, while at anchor in a current. • Inwater, buoyed line stretching between the stern of the boat to the anchor line. • Used to assist divers while swimming against current from stern of boat to anchor line. c. Current (or stern) lines. Specialty Course Instructor Outline 18
  • 25. • Buoyed line extending from stern of boat down cur- rent. • Used by divers who accidentally ascend behind the boat, down current. [Remind divers that this should not happen.] • The diver grabs the line — using it to help him remain stationary while crew pulls it toward the boat, or to pull himself toward the boat, hand-over-hand while swimming. 6. Boat diving ascents a. Remember S.A.F.E. concepts — Safely Ascend From Every dive. • Ascend no faster than 18 metres/60 feet per minute. • Make at least a three-minute safety stop at 5 metres/15 feet. b. Use a reference line (anchor or trip line) when possible. c. Note time prior to leaving bottom. d. Remember to extend hand and look up and around, while slowly rotating during ascent. Watch out for bottom of boat. e. Ascend and surface near the boat flying a dive flag — this will help you avoid being hit by other boats. f. Once on surface, immediately signal “O.K.” to the boat and inflate BCD. 7. Boat diving exits a. General • Avoid crowding the exit area. Be patient; wait your turn. • Avoid being behind and under a diver pulling himself onto the boat or climbing up a boat ladder. He may slip or his tank may accidentally drop out of the back- pack. • Remove fins only after contact with the boat is made. • If exiting onto a boat swim step or stern platform, time your exit with the swells. Use a swell to assist you up and on the platform. • Hand accessory equipment (cameras, etc.) to boat crew if available. b. The type of exit(s) we will make during the dives in this course are: • __________________________________ • __________________________________ Boat Diver 19
  • 26. K. Postdive procedures Learning Objectives. By the end of this session, you will be able to: • Explain how to pack and stow your diving equipment, specific to the type of dive boat(s) being used during the course. • Explain why it is important to listen to postdive roll calls by divemas- ters or crew members. 1. Packing and stowing your equipment a. General • Don’t drop weight belt or tanks on boat deck — most are easily damaged and difficult/costly to repair. Be considerate. • Work out of your equipment bag — Don’t leave equip- ment spread all over the boat deck. Space is usually at a premium. • Secure tank or have it refilled. b. Specific information regarding the boat dive made during the course: • __________________________________ • __________________________________ 2. Divemaster or crew check-in procedures, roll calls and debrief- ings. a. General • If a divemaster is present, check in immediately after dive. This will let him know you are on board. • If a roll call is taken, be visually present. Should you not be on board, you don’t want to be left behind because someone answered for you. • If given, listen to the dive debriefing. b. Specific information regarding the boat dive made during the course: • __________________________________ • __________________________________ L. Summary — During this course we’ve discussed: 1. Why dive from boats? 2. Common boat terminology 3. Categories of dive boats 4. Safety and emergency boating equipment 5. Seasickness Specialty Course Instructor Outline 20
  • 27. 6. Preboarding procedures 7. Boarding procedures 8. Predive procedures 9. Dive procedures 10. Postdive procedures V. General Open Water Considerations A. Involve students in dive-planning activities. Have students pre- pare training buoys and special lines (current lines, trip lines, tag lines, etc.) if used. B. Due to the nature of boat diving, be sensitive to each student’s potential problem with seasickness. C. Predive briefings should cover proper boat diving etiquette, common boat terminology, specific boat diving entries and exits, local boat diving laws specific to diving and an overview of the vessel’s safety and emergency equipment. D. Vessels used to conduct this dive may range from small inflatables to large, live-aboard charter boats. When possible, attempt to match the vessel used for the course with the type of vessel the stu- dent is most likely to dive from once the course is completed. E. When possible, and if appropriate, conduct each dive from a differ- ent type of boat. This will provide students with a more universal understanding of boat diving. F. When possible, and if applicable, have students conduct their safety stops under the boat on a weighted line, safety stop bar, a trip line, or on the anchor line. G. Students completing the optional “Seamanship and Small Boat Handling” module could practice the recommended skills via two methods: 1. Being allowed to handle the boat both prior to and after the dive. 2. During a specific boat-handling session, separate from the actual open water dives. Boat Diver 21
  • 28. VI. Open Water Sessions For clarity, each open water dive is outlined completely. Skills and proce- dures specific to an individual dive appear in boldface type. A. Open Water Training Dive One Performance Requirements. By the end of this open water training session, the student will be able to: • Identify the following areas of the specific boat being used for the dive: bow, stern, starboard, port, entry area, exit area and area to stow diving equipment. • Locate important emergency/safety equipment aboard the boat (such as: first aid kit, oxygen, dive flag, radio and fire extinguisher). • Perform a proper entry, specific to the type of boat being used for the dive. • Perform a safety stop at 5 metres/15 feet for at least three minutes. • Perform a proper exit, specific to the type of boat being used for the dive. 1. Briefing a. Location of specific areas on the boat: bow, stern, starboard, port, entry area, exit area and area to stow diving equipment. b. Location of important emergency/safety equipment aboard the boat. c. Evaluation of conditions. If the boat is anchored and a current is present, remember to begin dive by swimming into the cur- rent. Also, if the boat is at anchor and near a shoreline, dive between the boat and the shore. d. Facilities on dive boat (if any): head, galley, showers, etc. e. Bottom composition and topography around dive site. f. Depth range on bottom. g. Ending tank pressure — when to terminate the dive. h. Interesting and helpful facts about the dive site. i. Sequence of training dive — review Dive One tasks. • Boat diving entry (where and what type). • Descent (where and how). • Dive for fun and pleasure. • Ascent (where and how) — safety stop. • Boat diving exit (where and what type). • Stow equipment. j. Special communication underwater and topside (review of boat recall system, if so equipped). k. What to do if student loses class/buddy under-water. l. What to do if student loses reference line. Specialty Course Instructor Outline 22
  • 29. m. What to do if an emergency arises. n. Buddy assignments 2. Predive procedures a. Prepare personal diving equipment. b. Perform no decompression calculations. [Students should use Deluxe Data Carrier or Recreational Dive Planner Data Carrier.] c. Don personal diving equipment. d. Perform proper buddy equipment check — BWRAF. e. Practice buddy breathing and alternate air source breath- ing techniques (before diving with an unfamiliar buddy). f. Demonstrate proper boat diving entry technique. g. Maintain buddy contact on the surface. h. Swim to reference line or dive site. 3. Descent. a. Set and start your timing device (record time if necessary). b. Vent air from BCD. c. Equalize air spaces. d. Maintain subsurface buddy contact. e. Neutralize buoyancy during descent. f. Demonstrate anti-silting techniques near bottom. 4. Dive for fun and pleasure 5. Ascent a. Record bottom time on slate. b. Neutral buoyant ascent at a rate no faster than 18 metres/60 feet per minute. Make safety stop at 5 metres/15 feet for three minutes. 6. Postdive procedures a. Signal support personnel once on the surface (if appropri- ate). b. Achieve comfortable positive buoyancy using your BCD. d. Rest on the surface momentarily. e. Swim toward exit area on the boat. f. Demonstrate proper boat diving exit technique. g. Check in with divemaster (if appropriate). h. Assist your buddy with equipment removal. i. Set your timing device for surface interval (if necessary). j. Stow personal equipment on the boat as instructed. k. Listen for roll call (if appropriate). l. Calculate pressure group letter (if needed for a second dive in six hours). Boat Diver 23
  • 30. 7. Debriefing a. Positive feedback regarding performance. b. Questions specific to boat diving 8. Log dive (Instructor signs log) B. Open Water Training Dive Two Performance Requirements. By the end of this open water training session, the student will be able to: • Demonstrate the ability to construct a dive plan that takes into account the type of boat being used and the diving environment. • Demonstrate the ability to apply the knowledge learned from the course to dive from the type of boat being used. 1. Briefing a. Review location of important emergency/safety equip- ment aboard the boat (if diving from a boat different from Dive One). b. Evaluation of conditions. If the boat is anchored and a current is present, remember to begin dive by swimming into the current. Also, if the boat is at anchor and near a shoreline, dive between the boat and the shore. c. Review facilities on dive boat (if any): head, galley, showers, etc. (if diving from a boat different from Dive One). d. Bottom composition and topography around dive site. e. Depth range on bottom. f. Ending tank pressure — when to terminate the dive. g. Interesting and helpful facts about the dive site. h. Sequence of training dive — review Dive 1 tasks. • Develop dive plan. • Boat diving entry (students decide where and what type). • Descent (students decide where and how). • Dive for fun and pleasure. • Ascent (students decide where and how) — safety stop. • Boat diving exit (students decide where and what type). • Stow equipment. i. Special communication underwater and topside (review of boat recall system, if so equipped). j. What to do if student loses class/buddy underwater. k. What to do if student loses reference line. Specialty Course Instructor Outline 24
  • 31. l. What to do if an emergency arises. m. Buddy assignments 2. Predive procedures a. Prepare personal diving equipment b. Perform no decompression calculations. [Students should use Deluxe Data Carrier or Recreational Dive Planner Data Carrier.] c. Don personal diving equipment. d. Perform proper buddy equipment check — BWRAF. e. Practice buddy breathing and alternate-air-source breath- ing techniques (before diving with an unfamiliar buddy). f. Demonstrate proper boat diving entry technique. g. Maintain buddy contact on the surface. h. Swim to reference line or dive site. 3. Descent a. Set and start your timing device (record time if necessary). b. Vent air from BCD. c. Equalize air spaces. d. Maintain subsurface buddy contact. e. Neutralize buoyancy during descent. f. Demonstrate anti-silting techniques near bottom. 4. Dive for fun and pleasure 5. Ascent a. Record bottom time on slate. b. Neutral buoyant ascent at a rate no faster than 18 metres/60 feet per minute. Make safety stop at 5 metres/15 feet for three minutes. 6. Postdive procedures a. Signal support personnel once on the surface (if appropri- ate). b. Achieve comfortable positive buoyancy using your BCD. c. Rest on the surface momentarily. d. Swim toward exit area on the boat. e. Demonstrate proper boat diving exit technique. f. Check in with divemaster (if appropriate). g. Assist your buddy with equipment removal. h. Set your timing device for surface interval (if necessary). i. Stow personal equipment on the boat as instructed. j. Listen for roll call (if appropriate). k. Calculate pressure group letter (if needed for a second dive in six hours). Boat Diver 25
  • 32. 7. Debriefing a. Positive feedback regarding performance. b. Questions specific to boat diving. 8. Log dive (Instructor signs log) VII. Basic Seamanship and Small Boat Handling (optional module intended to be personal- ized for local boating situations) When available and convenient, students interested in seamanship and small boat handling should be directed to specialized courses offered in this subject area (like those offered by national Coast Guard units, power squadrons, private schools, colleges/universities, etc.). However, PADI Boat Diving Instructors may teach some or all of the Seamanship and Small Boat Handling module as needed to augment a student’s knowledge of boat diving. Comple- tion of this module does not indicate complete knowledge of operating or handling any size/type dive boat. The following outline was designed as a starting point, from which you may customize your own outline. For more information, and to assist you in completing your personalized outline (specific to local laws, techniques, etc.), use reference books and manuals on the subject. Much of the outline is skill-oriented and is best learned through actual boating activity — not in the classroom. Make the module as practical as possible. A. Local boating laws and regulations Learning Objectives. By the end of this session, you will be able to: • Comply with local boating laws and regulations specific to: a) boat ownership, b) registration, c) numbering, and 4) documentation. • Comply with local boating laws and regulations specific to required boating equipment. _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ Specialty Course Instructor Outline 26
  • 33. _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ B. Basic rules of the road Learning Objectives. By the end of this session, you will be able to: • Define rules of the road for small boat handling. • Comply with local rules of the road. • Comply with international rules of the road. _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ C. Basic seamanship Learning Objectives. By the end of this session, you will be able to: • Identify the construction, materials and characteristics of various kinds of rope. • Tie the following knots and describe their usage while boating: figure- eight, two half-hitches, granny, reef or square knot, bowline, clove hitch, and sheet bend. • Splice two pieces of rope together for permanent joining. • Coil and stow rope for future use. • Demonstrate basic boat handling and helmsmanship abilities. • Launch and trailer a small dive boat. • Operate the marine radio on board a dive boat according to local regulations and procedures. Boat Diver 27
  • 34. 1. Marlinespike seamanship — Ropes, knots, splices, rope use and care 2. Boat handling and helmsmanship a. Starting and stopping the engine b. How to trim the load — weight distribution on board c. Basic steering d. Leaving a dock and docking e. Picking up a mooring f. Picking up divers g. Coming along side h. Turning in a confined area i. Power turns j. Handling a boat at high speeds k. Handling a boat at slow speeds l. Towing another boat m. Handling a boat in rough weather n. Emergency actions • Man overboard • Capsized boat • Loss of engine power 3. Launching and trailering a. Launching from a ramp b. Launching from a beach c. Beaching a small boat d. Basic trailering techniques 4. Operating a marine radio — regulations and procedures _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ Specialty Course Instructor Outline 28
  • 35. D. Basic anchoring techniques Learning Objectives. By the end of this session, you will be able to: • Select an anchor type for the diving being done, bottom characteris- tics, amount of current and wind, and the type of boat being used. • Set up an anchor configuration for a dive boat using all appropriate groundtackle — rope, chain, fittings and anchor. • Select an anchorage for diving. • Stow an anchor on board a small dive boat for maximum accessibility while taking up a minimum of deck space. • Secure an anchor rope to a small dive boat. • Deploy and set an anchor. • Retrieve an anchor. 1. Selecting the correct anchor 2. Setting up an anchoring system for a small boat 3. Selecting a proper anchorage for diving 4. How to stow an anchor on board a boat 5. Securing an anchor rope to a boat 6. Deploying and setting an anchor 7. Retrieving an anchor E. Basic boating navigation Learning Objectives. By the end of this session, you will be able to: • Use a boat’s compass for basic navigation. • Identify common, local navigational aids. • Read a local navigational chart to locate (or relocate) a dive site. • Use available and appropriate electronic navigational aids to locate (or relocate) a dive site. 1. Using the compass on board the dive boat. [If appropriate and if the boat being used has a compass, review its usage with the students.] 2. Local navigational aids. [Review such aids as buoys, daybea- cons, lights, fog signals, lightships and radiobeacons.] 3. Reading local navigational charts. [If appropriate, review with students how to use navigational charts for boat diving.] 4. Using electronic navigational aids. [If appropriate and avail- able, orient students to the use of electronic navigational aids — radio direction finders, fathometres, loran, omega and satel- lite navigation.] Boat Diver 29
  • 36. F. Basic piloting Learning Objectives. By the end of this session, you will be able to: • Define the term piloting. • State the seven dimensions of piloting. • Use available and appropriate piloting instruments. • Use the basic principles of dead reckoning while piloting a boat. 1. Piloting: The use of landmarks, aids to navigation and sound- ings to conduct a vessel safely through channels, harbors and along coasts where dangers to navigation require constant attention to the boat’s position and course. 2. Seven dimensions of piloting: a. Direction b. Distance c. Time d. Speed e. Position f. Depths g. Heights (bridges, etc.) 3. Piloting instruments a. Charts b. Magnetic compass c. Chart plotting devices d. Clock e. Speedometers f. Binoculars 4. Dead Reckoning (DR) a. Definition: The advancement of the boat’s position on the chart from its last accurately determined location, using the courses steered and the speeds through the water. b. Information needed: • Course: direction in which a boat is to be steered or is being steered. Direction of travel. • Heading: the direction in which a boat is pointed at any given moment. • Speed: rate of travel through the water. • Distance: plot of a future-intended track. c. Basic principles • DR track always started from a known position. • Only true courses steered are used for determining a DR track. Specialty Course Instructor Outline 30
  • 37. • Only the speed through the water is used for deter- mining distance traveled and a DR position along the track. d. Plotting techniques on charts e. Distance, time and speed calculations G. Tides and currents Learning Objectives. By the end of this session, you will be able to: • Define the term tide and explain the importance of tides to boating. • State the two basic forces that interact to produce tides. • Identify the two celestial bodies affecting tidal movement and state which one has more influence. • Define the following terms: high tide, low tide, tidal range, spring and neap tides. • State the characteristics of the following tide types: semidiurnal, diur- nal and mixed. • Determine the state of tide or tidal current flow in local coastal waters. • Compare and contrast the following types of currents: tidal currents, river currents, major ocean currents, and wind-driven currents. 1. Definition of tides: alternate rising and falling of water within a certain time period. Importance to boaters: depth while crossing shoals, anchoring (letting out enough scope), adjust- ing lines while tied to pier or wharf. 2. Forces that produce tides a. Gravitational pull of sun and moon b. Moon has greater effect since closer to earth 3. Tidal fluctuations a. High tide: highest level reached by an ascending tide. b. Low tide: lowest level reached by a descending tide. c. Tidal range: difference between high and low waters. d. Spring tides: maximum tidal ranges within a lunar month. e. Neap tides: minimum tidal ranges within a lunar month. 4. Types of tides a. Diurnal: Single high and single low tide each day. b. Semidiurnal: Two high and two low tides each day, where the heights of the highs and lows are almost equal. c. Mixed: Approximately two high and two low tides each day, where the heights of the highs and lows are unequal. Boat Diver 31
  • 38. 5. Determining local tidal conditions. ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ 6. Currents — the horizontal movement of water a. Tidal currents — caused by rise and fall of tides b. River currents c. Major ocean currents d. Wind-driven currents e. Local current concerns ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ H. Basic guides to boating safety. 1. Carry proper equipment — know how to use it 2. Maintain boat and equipment in top condition 3. Know and obey the rules of the road 4. Operate with care, courtesy and common sense 5. Always keep your boat under complete control 6. Watch posted speeds; slow down in anchorages 7. Do not ever overload your boat 8. See that lifesaving equipment is accessible 9. Check local weather reports before departure 10. Inspect hull, engine and all gear frequently 11. Keep bilges clean, electrical contacts tight 12. Guard rigidly against any fuel system leakage Specialty Course Instructor Outline 32
  • 39. 13. Have fire extinguishers instantly available 14. Take maximum precautions when taking on fuel 15. Be sure to allow adequate scope when anchoring 16. Request (where available) a boat inspection by a qualified marine safety organization (Coast Guard, etc.) 17. Enroll in boating classes Boat Diver 33
  • 40. Name _______________________________________________________________________ Date ____________ Boat Dive Knowledge Review Answer Key To the student: Answer the following questions and bring this completed Knowledge Review with you to your next training session. Windward 1. On the illustration, label the following: bow, stern, port, starboard, windward and leeward. Starboard Side Bow (Forward) Stern (Aft) Leeward Port Side 2. List eight pieces of emergency equipment commonly found on dive boats. 3. Describe how to help prevent seasickness, and what to do if you become seasick. Prevention: Medication, sleep, avoid alcohol, eat, get fresh air, avoid intricate tasks, look at horizon. If seasickness occurs: Leeward rail to vomit, drink water, stay in middle of boat outside in fresh air. 4. Describe the general boarding procedure for a “typical” charter boat. Plan to board 1/2 hour prior to departure. Ask crew where to stow equipment. Sign-in and listen to predive briefings. 5. On most dive boats be sure to work from your dive bag and not take up. Excessive space 6. Explain the general guidelines for making proper entries from various types of boats. When ready to enter water, make sure buddy is also ready. Check in with divemaster (if there is one). Partially inflate BCD, put regulator in mouth (unless donning unit in water). Make sure entry area is clear, hold mask firmly. Have accessories handed down. Specialty Course Instructor Outline 34
  • 41. 7. Explain the location and purpose for: trip line, gear line, tag line, current line. Trip line: Rises up from anchor – used for ascent/descent line. Gear line: Usually near entry/exit area – used to suspend accessories. Tag line: From anchor to entry area on surface – used to pull yourself from entry area to anchorline. Current line: Trailed behind boat – used to maintain position in a current and pull yourself to boat. 8. Describe the procedures for making a free descent from a boat. Take care to avoid disorientation. Watch descent rate – maintain buddy contact. 9. What are the general guidelines for making a proper exit into a charter boat? Wait turn to exit, avoid positioning yourself under a diver on a ladder. Time swells to assist with exit – letting them carry you onto platform. Don’t remove fins until contact with boat is made. Hand up accessory equipment. 10. Explain why you should listen to post-dive roll calls by divemasters or crew members. This procedure makes sure everyone is aboard and accounted for before leaving the area. Student Statement: I have had explained to me and I understand the questions I missed. Name __________________________________________________________________________ Date ___________ Adventure Dive: Boat Skills Overview • Knowledge Review • Predive Safety Check (BWRAF) • Briefing • Boat Diving Entry • Suiting Up • Dive for Fun and Pleasure Boat Diver 35
  • 42. Boat Diver PADI Adventure Dive Training Record Adventure Dive: BOAT DIVE Skills Overview • Knowledge Review • Ascent – Safety Stop • Briefing • Boat Diving Exit • Suiting Up • Stow Equipment • Predive Safety Check (BWRAF) • Debrief • Boat Diving Entry • Log Dive – Complete Training • Dive for Fun and Pleasure Record Instructor Statement "I verify that this student has satisfactorily completed the Knowledge Review and Performance Requirements (as described in PADI's Adventures in Diving Program Instructor Guide) for this PADI Adventure Dive. I am a renewed, Teaching status PADI Instructor for the current year." Instructor Name First Middle Initial Last Instructor Signature PADI No. Dive Completion Date Day/Month/Year Instructor Contact Information (Please Print) Instructor Mailing Address City State/Province Country Zip/Postal Code Phone/FAX/email Student Diver Statement "I verify that I have completed all of the Performance Requirements for this Adventure Dive. I realize that there is more to learn about boat diving and that completion of a PADI Boat Diver course is highly recommended. I also agree to abide by PADI Standard Safe Diving Practices." Diver Signature Date Day/Month/Year 42 Specialty Course Instructor Outline 36
  • 43. PADI Specialty Training Record Boat Diver I verify that this student has satisfactorily completed all academic and/or any confined water train- ing sessions as outlined in the PADI Specialty Course Instructor Outline for Boat Diver. I am a renewed, Teaching status PADI Instructor in this specialty. Instructor Name _____________________________________________________________________________________________ PADI#_____________ Instructor Signature _______________________________________________________________________________ Completion Date ______________ Open Water Dives Dive One I verify that this student has satisfactorily completed Dive One as outlined in the PADI standardized outline for Boat Diver including: • Boat diving entry • Descend • Dive for fun and pleasure • Ascent, perform safety stop for 3 minutes at 5 metres/15 feet • Boat diving exit • Stow equipment I am a renewed, Teaching status PADI Instructor in this specialty. Instructor Name _________________________________________________________________________________________________ PADI #______________ Instructor Signature ____________________________________________________________________________________ Completion Date _______________ Dive Two I verify that this student has satisfactorily completed Dive Two as outlined in the PADI standardized outline for Boat Diver including: • Develop dive plan • Boat diving entry • Descend • Dive for fun and pleasure • Ascent, perform safety stop for 3 minutes at 5 metres/15 feet • Boat diving exit • Stow equipment I am a renewed, Teaching status PADI Instructor in this specialty. Instructor Name _________________________________________________________________________________________________ PADI #______________ Instructor Signature ____________________________________________________________________________________ Completion Date _______________ I verify that I have completed all performance requirements for this Boat Diver Specialty. I am adequately prepared to dive in areas and under conditions similar to those in which I was trained. I agree to abide by PADI Standard Safe Diving Practices. Student Name _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Student Signature ___________________________________________________________________________________________Date ______________ Boat Diver 37
  • 44. Specialty Course Instructor Outline 38

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