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Seeing photographs

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Published in: Art & Photos, Technology
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Transcript

  • 1. Seeing Photographs
  • 2. What’s Wrong with these Photos?
  • 3.  
  • 4.  
  • 5.  
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  • 12.  
  • 13.  
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  • 15.  
  • 16. How do you learn to take better pictures?
    • Learn the technology
    • Visualize the end product
    • Make choices as you photograph
  • 17. Framing
    • The frame isolates part of a larger scene
    • How much of the scene do you want to include?
    • Framing can strengthen a picture or make it awkward
  • 18. What’s Working on these Photos?
  • 19. Delarosa
  • 20. Joel Sartore
  • 21. Joel Sartore
  • 22. David Juguet
  • 23. Martin Waldbauer
  • 24. Ian Plant
  • 25. Close up or not?
    • Choose how much of the scene to include.
    • Beginners often shoot too wide
      • Try shooting the whole scene, then move closer to the details
      • This can help with unwanted background
  • 26. Jeremie Mazenq
  • 27.  
  • 28. Ibrahim Kerem Ozturk
  • 29. Backgrounds
    • Pay attention to what surrounds your focal point
    • Backgrounds can be interesting or distracting
    • Should it be in focus or blurry?
  • 30.  
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  • 33. Where to Place a Subject
    • Moving the subject to the left or right of the frame can add interest.
    • Since we read left to right, people will read a subject on the left first
  • 34. Vadim Trunov
  • 35. Borinamisica
  • 36. Motion You have two major choices with motion: 1. Stop the motion 2. Blur the motion
  • 37.  
  • 38.  
  • 39. Perspective/Point of View/Camera Angle
    • Perspective can create illusion of 3-dimensions on a 2D photograph
    • Point of view can add interest
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  • 47. The Rule of Thirds
    • Started by painters in the 19 th century
    • Divide the frame into threes vertically and horizontally
    • The most important things go in the four intersections
    • The strongest intersection is the top left.
  • 48. The Rule of Thirds
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