Ch6

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Ch6

  1. 1. Process <ul><li>Process is hard to break down in photography because it happens so fast </li></ul><ul><li>It could be called luck, but photographers call it intuition and experience </li></ul><ul><li>we are searching for a way to order our photos from what is available with reactive photography </li></ul><ul><li>We will be looking at reactive photography </li></ul>
  2. 2. Snapshot Aesthetic <ul><li>Informal composition </li></ul><ul><li>Considered “happy accidents” or nontraditional technique and framing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Flare </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Odd camera angles </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Camera shake </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sharp shadows </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Out of focus </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Eyes closed </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Apparently unposed </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Poor framing </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Willful disregard for the principles of composition that is justified by calling itself conceptual </li></ul><ul><li>This created a rift between photography and fine art photography </li></ul>
  3. 3. Snapshot Aesthetic <ul><li>Trend in fine art photography from about 1963 </li></ul><ul><li>Features banal everyday subject matter and often there is no link between photographs </li></ul><ul><li>Well known photographers include: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nan Goldin, Wolfgang Tillmans, Martin Parr, William Eggleston, Terry Richardson, Lee Freidlanderx </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>&quot;Photography is not about the thing photographed. It is about how that thing looks photographed.&quot; </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Garry Winogrand </li></ul></ul>
  5. 6. Lee Friedlander
  6. 8. Nan Goldin
  7. 10. Examples in Commercial Photography
  8. 11. American Apparel
  9. 12. Dr. Martens
  10. 13. The Search For Order <ul><li>Creating order in photography is harder b/c everything in front of the lens is recorded </li></ul><ul><li>Through organization, our conceptions and emotions become concrete and communicable </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cartier-Bresson </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What about photography that challenges the norms we have studied up to now? </li></ul>
  11. 14. search for order
  12. 15. order
  13. 16. Hunting <ul><li>“ As a photographer, you are hunting for a photograph that meets your needs yet is drawn from a fluid, evolving set of events.” (photojournalism) </li></ul><ul><li>“ I prowled the streets all day, feeling very strung up and ready to pounce, determined to trap life-to preserve life in the act of living. Above all, I craved to seize, in the confines one single photograph, the whole essence of some situation that was in the process of unrolling itself before my eyes.” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Henri Cartier-Bresson </li></ul></ul>
  14. 20. Reaction <ul><li>Areas of preparation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Camera handling </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Observation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Composition Techniques </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>State of mind </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Intuition </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hone your skills, then empty your mind before you shoot </li></ul></ul>
  15. 21. reaction
  16. 22. Anticipation <ul><li>1. Behavior and action anticipation </li></ul><ul><li>- Anticipating how things move across the field and light changes </li></ul><ul><li>Graphic anticipation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>- Seeing how shapes, lines…will come together in the frame </li></ul></ul>
  17. 23. anticipation
  18. 24. exploration
  19. 25. exploration
  20. 26. exploration
  21. 27. exploration
  22. 28. juxtaposition
  23. 29. juxtaposition

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