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Art Appreciation-Chapter3
 

Art Appreciation-Chapter3

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  • Oil on cardboard. 35-1⁄2" × 30" (90.2 × 76.2 cm). Alfred Stieglitz Collection, 1949 (49.59.1). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY, U.S.A. Image copyright © The Metropolitan Museum of Art/Art Resource, NY.
  • Private collection, courtesy of DC Moore Gallery, New York. ©2010 The Jacob and Gwendolyn Lawrence Foundation, Seattle/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
  • National Gallery, London.
  • National Gallery, London.
  • The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. The Panza Collection. Art © Estate of Robert Rauschenberg/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY.
  • Maryland Historical Society, Baltimore.
  • Photograph: Antonio M. Rosario/Getty Images Inc. – Image Bank.
  • © Damien Hirst. Courtesy of Gagosian Gallery. Photograph: Purcence Cuming Associates, Inc. © 2010 Hirst Holdings Limited and Damien Hirst. All rights reserved, ARS, New York/DACS, London.
  • Erich Lessing/Art Resource, NY.
  • © The Cleveland Museum of Art, 2001, Leonard C. Hanna, Jr., Fund, 1981.18.
  • The Barber Institute of Fine Arts, University of Birmingham. Bridgeman Art Library.
  • The Barber Institute of Fine Arts, University of Birmingham. Bridgeman Art Library.
  • Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, England, UK.
  • Courtesy of The Hispanic Society of America, New York.
  • National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa. Photo: © NGC.
  • Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC: Purchase, F1956.20.
  • The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Given Anonymously. Photograph © 2002 The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © Clemente V. Orozco. Reproduction authorized by the Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes.
  • North facade of The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, Missouri including one of four "Shuttlecocks," 1994, by Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen. Purchase; acquired through the generosity of the Sosland Family. © Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen. F94-1/1 Photograph by Jamison Miller.
  • Canali Photobank.
  • LVR-Landesmuseum Bonn.

Art Appreciation-Chapter3 Art Appreciation-Chapter3 Presentation Transcript

  • How An Artwork Is Built Chapter 3
  • From Toolbox to Creation
    • How does an artist use the visual tools in their toolbox to create an artwork?
    • They organize these tools into compositions, also called design
    • We’ll be looking at the basic design principles:
      • Unity and variety
      • Balance
      • Emphasis and subordination
      • Contrast
      • Repetition and rhythm
      • Scale and proportion
  • Bad Design
    • Even those without formal art training can see when bad design is at work
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  • Good Design It’s Easy to Spot
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  • Charles Demuth (1883–1935). The Figure 5 in Gold . 1928. 35-1/2" × 30" (90.2 × 76.2 cm). Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
  • Unity and Variety
    • Unity-the appearance of oneness
      • The feeling that the design is complete and all elements are working together
    • Variety-diversity
    • Most artists try to find a balance
  • Yves Klein
  • Jacob Lawrence. Going Home . Line study. 1946. 21-1/2" × 29-1/2". Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
  • Pieter de Hooch. Interior of a Dutch House . 1658. 29" × 35". Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
  • Pieter de Hooch. Interior of a Dutch House . Line Study. 1658. 29" × 35". Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
  • Robert Rauschenberg. Gift for Apollo . 1959. 43-3/4" × 29-1/2" × 41" (111.1 × 74.9 × 104.1 cm). Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
  • Balance
    • Balance-equilibrium
    • Symmetrical Balance-left and right are near or exactly match each other
  • James Hoban. A Design for the President's House . Elevation. 1792. Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
  • James Hoban. A Design for the President's House . White House. Front View. 1997. Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
  • Damien Hirst. Posterity—The Holy Place . 2006. 89-5/8" × 48". Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
  • Asymmetrical Balance
    • Asymmetrical balance-the left and right sides are not the same
      • Instead, balance is achieved through the size and meaning of the elements
  • Lavinia Fontana. Noli Me Tangere . 1581. 47-3/8" × 36-5/8". Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
  • Visual Weight
    • A large form is heavier than a small one
    • A form close to the edge of the frame is heavier
    • A complex form is heavier than a simple one
    • Warm colors are heavier and advance toward the viewer
    • Intense colors are heavier
    • The weight of a color increases as the background approaches its complementary hue
  • Nicolas Poussin (French, 1594–1665). The Holy Family on the Steps . 1648. 72.4 × 111.7 cm. Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
  • Edgar Degas (1834–1917). Jockeys Before the Race . c. 1878–1879. 42-1/2" × 29". Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
  • Edgar Degas (1834–1917). Jockeys Before the Race . Line Study. c. 1878–1879. 42-1/2" × 29". Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
  • Emphasis and Subordination
    • Emphasis-used to draw the attention of the viewer
    • Subordination-used to create areas of lesser interest
    • By using these two principles the artist shows the viewer where to look
  • Directional Forces
    • Like emphasis and subordination, directional forces tell the viewer where to look
    • Directional forces have the added advantage of showing the viewer where to look next.
  • Francisco Goya. Bullfight: The Agility and Daring of Juanito Apinani . Plate 20. 9-1/2" × 14".Francisco Goya. Bullfight: The Agility and Daring of Juanito Apinani . Line Study. Plate 20. 9-1/2" × 14". Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
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  • Annie Leibovitz
  • Contrast
    • Contrast-opposing elements
      • Dark vs. light
      • Large vs. small
      • Thick vs. thin
  • Luster-Painted Bowl . Hispano-Moresque, Manises. Spain. c. 1400. Height 5-1/2", diameter 17-4/5". Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
  • Repetition and Rhythm
    • Repition-repeating elements
    • Rhythm-regular repeating elements
  • Liubov Popova. The Pianist . 1915. 106.5 × 88.7 cm. Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
  • Ogata Korin (1658–1716.) Cranes . Japanese, Edo period (1615–1868). c. 1700. 166 H × 371 cm (65-3/8" × 146-1/6"). Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
  • José Clemente Orozco. Zapatistas . 1931. 45" × 55" (114.3 × 139.7 cm). Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
  • Scale and Proportion
    • Scale-the size of one thing in relation to another
    • Proportion-size relationship of the parts that make up a whole
  • Scale Relationships. Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
  • Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen. Shuttlecocks . One of four.1994. 215-3/4" × 209" × 191-3/4". Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
  • Michelangelo Buonarroti. Pietà. 1501. Height 6'8-1/2". Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.
  • Roettgen Pietà . 1300–1325. Height 34-1/2". Copyright ©2011, ©2009 Pearson Prentice Hall Inc.